• ...And the contraflow system glittered

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Antiphon, 2015)
    • Contents May Settle

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (The Interpreter's House, 2016-10-01)
      Poem
    • A Cyborg Observes Oxford Circus

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Ink Sweat and Tears Press, 2015-07-31)
      Poem
    • A Fool lies here who tried to hustle the East: Neo-Colonialism and Self-Fashioning in Hunter S. Thompson’s The Curse of Lono

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2011-03-10)
      This essay departs from the critical consensus on The Curse of Lono (1983) to argue that it forms an important part of Hunter S. Thompson’s oeuvre and shows significant developments from his celebrated 1970s work. The novel functions politically as a critique of late twentieth-century US neo-colonialism and thus anticipates the current globalization debate, at the same time as wrestling with the connected problem of its author’s acknowledged status as a celebrity or branded American product. The Curse of Lono’s complex structure of interwoven extracts from Thompson’s research sources, as well as Ralph Steadman’s drawings, reduces the importance of the central subjective voice that Thompson had employed since his 1970s books, enabling the novel to comment ironically on the notorious Gonzo persona in which, thanks to the very success of his earlier work, Thompson had become trapped, and on which he still depended commercially (I refer here to Michel Foucault’s concept of the author-function). The Curse of Lono mocks its Gonzo protagonist as both a tourist and a buffoon: it comments on the subjectivism of Gonzo ironically, pushing celebrity to its ludicrous limit by making the protagonist divine. At the same time, the novel demonstrates how authorship can emerge from the historical forces that fashion culture, such as globalization In order to unpack the satirical content of The Curse of Lono in the detail it deserves, this essay adopts a position broadly aligned with the Marxist stance on globalization that sees it as a term masking Western imperialism and the needs of finance capital: I refer here to the work of David Held, Anthony McGrew, Peter Cox, James Annesley and others.
    • Fowles's The French lieutenant's woman

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Continuum, 2007-11-15)
      This book discusses the literary and historical context of the novel; the treatment of gender, sexuality, and social class; reviews of the novel, and the 1981 film adaptation.
    • From image to frame: The filming of The French Lieutenant's woman

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Chester Academic Press, 2009-08-22)
      This book chapter discusses the novel, screenplay, and film of the The French Lieutenant's woman in order to examine the roles of the reader, viewer, actors, director, and screenwriter.
    • Gonzo republic: Hunter S Thompson's America

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Continuum, 2011-11-24)
      This book examines Hunter S Thompson's complex relationship with America, covering the whole range of Thompson's work, from his early reporting from South American client states of the USA in the 1960s to his twenty-first century internet columns on sport, politics, and 9/11.
    • History, Globalization and The Human Subject in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019-07-25)
      Jacob de Zoet and Aibagawa Orito, the protagonists of The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, think and act like people of their time and place. Mitchell's novel thus falls into step with Georg Lukács's classic Marxist account of historical fiction as a genre that 'endeavours to portray the struggles and antagonisms of history by means of characters who, in their psychology and destiny, always represent social trends and historical forces'. The gestures, hints and fantasies that characterize Jacob's and Orito's unconsummated affair suggest in microcosm the state of world historical relationships in the novel, where the expansionist West and isolationist Japan imagine one another, creating spectres of race and nation. The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet alludes to its own time by advancing Mitchell's project, begun in Ghostwritten, of engagement with the contemporary globalized world where civilizations clash in a state of mutual ignorance. Caroline Edwards has shown how Ghostwritten and Cloud Atlas offer 'a non-contemporaneous narrative present' of the sort described by Jacques Derrida in Specters of Marx. Taking its cue from Edwards's point that this disjointed present exists in Mitchell's fiction to defamiliarize and critically examine 'the globalized capitalist world of his readership', this essay will study the contemporary cultural conflicts played out in the historical setting of Mitchell's Japan.
    • The Hornet

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (The Interpreter's House, 2017-10-01)
      Poem
    • How the Mini Moog Conquered Red China

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Magma, 2017-03-01)
      Poem
    • Island of the assassins: Cannabis, spectacle, and terror in Alex Garland's The beach

      Stephenson, William; University College Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2005-06)
      This article discusses the use of the cannabis, spectacle, and terror in Alex Garland's novel, The Beach. The author argues that Garland's novel is a most contemporary text, exposing disturbing contradictions in the West's current ideology and behavior.
    • John Fowles

      Stephenson, William; Chester College of Higher Education (Northcote House, 2003)
      This book discusses the life of John Fowles, all his works of fiction, and his most important non-fiction works.
    • Literature 1945-1990

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Continuum, 2010-02-28)
      This book chapter discusses key authors and texts from the late twentieth century, focusing on Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett and The magic toyshop by Angela Carter.
    • Literature 1990-the present

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Continuum, 2010-02-28)
      This book chapter discusses key authors and texts from 1990, focusing on Regeneration by Pat Barker and the poetry of Carol Ann Duffy.
    • Long stay one

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Nantwich Words and Music Festival, 2014-10-11)
    • Rain Dancers in the Data Cloud

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Templar Poetry, 2012-11-01)
      Poetry collection. Iota Shots Award Winner, 2012.
    • Scoring ecstasy: MDMA, consumerism and spirituality in the early fiction of Irvine Welsh

      Stephenson, William; Chester College of Higher Education (Taylor & Francis, 2003-04)
      This article discusses how Irvine Welsh, explores ecstasy's ability to enhance communication and offer people a version of religious ritual which means that the drug has the potential, at least, to modify subjectivity and intersubjective relationships in his work. The article focuses mainly on Welsh's novel Marabou Stork Nightmares, the novella 'The Undefeated' (from the collection Ecstasy) and the title story of the collection The Acid House.
    • Sing star

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Poetry Quarterly, 2014-07-10)
    • Sleepers

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (2014-10-01)
    • Source Code

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Ravenglass Poetry Press, 2013-03-27)