• The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain

      Parkin, Harry; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2021-08-03)
      A dictionary of family names found in Britain in the present day. A concise version of the Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland (2016).
    • English regional dialect lexis in the names and occupations of the Gloucestershire Cotswolds: a reassessment of the relationship between names and dialects

      Parkin, Harry; University of the West of England (De Gruyter, 2015-11-03)
      A number of surname-based studies have presented a relationship between medieval regional dialect lexis and the distribution of associated modern-day surnames. However, by carrying out localised research, it appears that the two might not be so closely linked as previously thought, with discrepancies in the distribution of regionally specific names and equivalent occupational descriptions. As a result, there seems to be a need to reconsider the connection between regional lexicons and corresponding name stocks, which may have been less closely related, at a period of non-hereditary by-naming, than current knowledge suggests.
    • Family Names

      Parkin, Harry; Hanks, Patrick (Oxford University Press, 2016-01-21)
      A summary of family naming systems around the world, and the current state of research in the field of surname study.
    • The fourteenth-century poll tax returns and the study of English surname distribution

      Parkin, Harry; University of the West of England (Taylor & Francis, 2015-01-22)
      The modern-day distributions of English surnames have been considered in genealogical, historical, and philological research as possible indicators of their origins. However, many centuries have passed since hereditary surnames were first used, and so their distribution today does not necessarily reflect their original spread, misrepresenting their origins. Previously, medieval data with national coverage have not been available for a study of surname distribution but, with the recent publication of the fourteenth century poll tax returns, this has changed. By presenting discrepancies in medieval and 19th-century distributions, it is shown that more recent surname data may not be a suitable guide to surname origins, and can be usefully supplemented by medieval data in order to arrive at more accurate conclusions.
    • Hereditary surname establishment in the Gloucestershire Cotswolds: a diachronic analysis

      Parkin, Harry; University of Chester (Paul Watkins, 2019)
      A study of the local development of hereditary surnames in the Gloucestershire Cotswolds in the 14th century, looking at how it may differ from the apparent national patterns of hereditary surname adoption, and the implications for further surname research
    • The onomastic data of the fourteenth-century poll tax returns: a case for further dialectological study of late medieval English

      Parkin, Harry; University of the West of England (De Gruyter Open, 2015-01-29)
      An important source of localisable Middle English dialectological data has recently become widely accessible, thanks to the published transcription of the 1377, 1379 and 1381 poll tax re-turns by Carolyn C. Fenwick (1998, 2001, 2005). As the only collection of onomastic data from the late fourteenth century with national coverage, the name forms in the records can be analysed to further our understanding of Middle English dialect distribution and change. As with many historical records, the poll tax returns are not without damage and so do not cover the country in its entirety, but provided their investigation is carried out with suitable methodological caution, they are of considerable dialectological value. Using the poll tax data, the distributions of two dialect features particular to the West Midlands (specifically rounding of /a/ to /o/ before nasals and /u/ in unstressed positions) are presented and compared with the patterns given for the same features in Kristensson’s (1987) dialect survey of data from 1290-1350. By identifying apparent discrepancies in dialect distribution from these datasets, which represent periods of no more than 100 years apart, it seems that the spread of certain Middle English dialect features may have changed considerably over a short space of time. Other possible reasons for these distribution differences are also suggested, highlighting the difficulties in comparing dialect data from differ-ent sets of records. Through this paper a case for further dialectological study, using the poll tax returns, is made, to add to the literature on Middle English dialect distribution and to improve our knowledge of ME dialect phonologies at the end of the fourteenth century.
    • Patterns of borrowing, obsolescence and polysemy in the technical vocabulary of Middle English

      Sylvester, Louise; Parkin, Harry; Ingham, Richard; University of Westminster; University of Chester; Birmingham City University
      This paper reports on a new project, Technical Language and Semantic Shift in Middle English which aims to address questions about why semantic shift, lexical and/or semantic obsolescence and replacement happen and to try to uncover patterns of narrowing, broadening, obsolescence and synonym co-existence at different levels of the lexical hierarchy. The data is based on the Middle English vocabulary for seven occupational domains collected for the Bilingual Thesaurus of Everyday Life in Medieval England, with the addition of two further domains representing the interests of the elite and professional classes. This paper offers three case studies illustrating how we used the type of information in the BTh, the MED and the OED to construct the semantic hierarchy on which our analyses are based; an example of how data are interpreted in relation to change within a particular semantic field; and an exploration of how obsolescence by distinguishing between obsolete lexemes and obsolete senses. We then present some results of our analyses of obsolescence, polysemy and borrowing in our data.
    • Software tools for big data resources in family names dictionaries

      Rambousek, Adam; Parkin, Harry; Horak, Ales; Masaryk University; University of the West of England (Maney Publishing, 2018-04-09)
      This paper describes the design and development of specific software tools used during the creation of Family Names in Britain and Ireland (FaNBI) research project, started by the University of the West of England in 2010 and finished successfully in 2016. First, the overview of the project and methodology is provided. Next section contains the description of dictionary management tools and software tools to combine input data resources.
    • The value of recent records, historical context, and genealogy in surname research

      Parkin, Harry (Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland, 2018)
      This paper looks at the importance of genealogical study and the consideration of recent records in the analysis of surname etymology.
    • Your City's Place Names: Leeds

      Parkin, Harry (English Place-Name Society, 2017-08-07)
      This book covers the principal districts (officially or unofficially recognized), some well-known buildings, features, and street-names, and the largest open spaces in the City of Leeds. For the purposes of this dictionary, the “City of Leeds” is defined by the Leeds metropolitan district area, though a few names outside but very close to this zone are also included. The metropolitan area of Leeds is one of the largest government districts in England, and so this dictionary covers a relatively large area, including places such as Wetherby, which is approximately 10 miles north-east of Leeds city centre.