• Alma and Abinadi: The Worth of Souls

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Greg Kofford, 2016-08-02)
      Our scripture study and reading often assume that the prophetic figures within the texts are in complete agreement with each other. Because of this we can fail to recognize that those authors and personalities frequently have different-and sometimes competing-views on some of the most important doctrines of the Gospel, including the nature of God, the roles of scripture and prophecy, and the Atonement. In this unique volume, fictionalized dialogues between the various voices of scripture illustrate how these differences and disagreements are not flaws of the texts but are rather essential features of the canon. These creative dialogues include Abraham and Job debating the utility of suffering and our submission to God, Alma and Abinidi disagreeing on the place of justice in the Atonement, and the authors Mark and Luke discussing the role of women in Jesus's ministry. It is by examining and embracing the different perspectives within the canon that readers are able to discover just how rich and invigorating the scriptures can be. The dialogues within this volume show how just as "iron sharpeneth iron," so can we sharpen our own thoughts and beliefs as we engage not just the various voices in the scriptures but also the various voices within our community (Proverbs 27:17).
    • Anatomy of a lesson ... building learning power with a focus on improving athletic performance

      Tones, Steven; Jones, Luke; University of Chester (Association for Physical Education, 2011)
      This article discusses a project between the University of Chester and one of its partnership schools, based on the belief that when like minded individuals come together they create new partnerships and energise learning.
    • Appleby and its fair: A contrasting locality pack for key stage 2

      Pickford, Barbara; Pickford, Anthony; Cheshire, Halton & Warrington Traveller Education Service ; University of Chester (Cheshire County Council, 2006)
      This pack (of booklet, photographs, and CD) gives information on the town of Appleby and its connection with gypsies and travellers.
    • Applied fantasy and wellbeing

      Wall, Tony; MacKenzie, Anna; Poole, Simon Elis; University of Chester and Storyhouse (Springer, 2019)
      Applied Fantasy is a new, innovative approach to wellbeing that demonstrates the significant potential within fantasy literature and media to provide effective and sustainable coping strategies for positive mental health. Emerging at the intersection of fantasy literature and media, mental health and wellbeing, and fan studies, the benefits from Applied Fantasy are two-fold. First, the concept of an individual being part of a wider fandom is a positive step towards a) combating isolation and b) subverting the stigma surrounding mental health; and second, the contents of the fantasy works themselves provide solid examples and guidance on how to manage mental health concerns while not overtly discussing coping strategies for mental health.
    • Are current accountability frameworks appropriate for degree apprenticeships?

      Lambert, Steve; University of Chester (Emerald, 2016-11)
      Purpose In 2015 the Conservative-led government announced their plan to increase the number of people participating in apprenticeship to 3 million by 2020. As part of this plan there is to be an expansion of the number of degree level apprenticeships, with the government suggesting that these should be seen as a real alternative to university. Despite the government’s propaganda of an alternative to university, higher education institutions (HEI) have a pivotal role to play in both the development and delivery of degree level apprenticeships. However, the accountability for the success of degree level apprenticeships remains unclear. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to consider whether existing outcome-based notions of accountability are appropriate, given the tri-partite relationship involved in apprenticeship delivery. Design/methodology/approach The paper provides an analysis of current notions of outcome-based accountability contextualised through the degree apprenticeship programme. Findings The paper illustrates that outcome-based accountability frameworks do little to support the delivery of degree level apprenticeships suggesting that there needs to be a shift to a holistic approach where student success forms just one element of an accountability framework. A conclusion is subsequently made that current accountability frameworks may end in an unnecessary confusion regarding the roles and responsibilities of individual contributors associated with degree apprenticeships, resulting in a missed opportunity to maximise on the value arising from the tri-partite delivery relationship. Originality/value This paper provides an original perspective involving accountability associated with degree apprenticeship programmes in the UK.
    • Art practice as education research

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012)
      This book chapter explores the theoretical and practical dilemmas that postgraduate students face when carrying out research projects through their art practice within the field of education. The chapter goes on to address the application of theory to research, the relevance and effectiveness of using theory.
    • Art, music and the global dimension

      McDougall, Ian; Duffty, Sian; Diocese of Chester ; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2009)
      This book chapter discusses activities which introduce children to products and creative processes drawn from diverse cultures at foundation stage, key stage 1, and key stage 2.
    • Beyond Text: The co-creation of dramatised character and iStory

      Passila. A.; Owens, Allan; Kuusipalo-Maatta, P.; Oikarinen, T.; Benmergui, R.; University of Lapeenranta, University of Lapeenranta, University of Lapeenranta, University of Tampere (Emerald, 2017)
      In exploring the impact of reflective and work applied approaches we are curious how vivid new insights and collective ‘Eureka’ momentums occur. These momentums can be forces for work communities to gain competitive advantages. However, we know little of how learning is actively involved in the processing of creating new insights and how such a turning to learning –mode (Pässilä and Owens, 2016) can be facilitated. In the light of cultural studies and art education, we explore how the method of dramatising characters in a specific innovation culture can be facilitated. In this viewpoint we are suggesting one approach for this type of turning to learning which we call Beyond Text, outlining its theoretical underpinnings, its co-creative development & its application In this Beyond Text context we are introducing the method of dramatising characters (DC) and the method of iStory both of which are our own design based on the theory of the four existing categories of research-based theatre (RBT). The findings of this viewpoint article are that both iStory as well as DC methods are useful and practical learning facilitation processes and platforms that can be adopted for use in organizations for promoting reflexivity. Especially they can act as a bridge between various forms of knowing and consummate the other knowledge types (experiential, practical and propositional) in a way that advances practice-based innovation. The originality and value of iStory and DC is that they can be utilized as dialogical evaluation methods when traditional evaluation strategies and pre-determined indicators are unusable.
    • Beyond the Big Six

      Holt, James; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2010-06-01)
      An exploration of the arguments surrounding the inclusion of minority religions in the teaching of RE
    • Beyond the Big Six Religions: Expanding the Boundaries in the Teaching of Religion and Worldviews

      Holt, James; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2019)
      Beyond the Big Six is a timely addition to the body of work surrounding the teaching of Religious Education in schools. The book will build on research surrounding the desirability and possibility of expanding the breadth of religious and non-religious worldviews within the classroom. Although it will be recognized that there are challenges in the existing circumstances to the inclusion of ‘smaller’ religions this book will articulate the importance of such an inclusion in today’s society. It will also explore how such religions might be used within the RE classroom; one distinctive quality of this book is the focus it will have on classroom applicability. While it will draw on research, there will be chapters to help teachers adopt an approach to the teaching of the major world religions, and particular Key Stages
    • Book Review: 'Art Disobedience and Ethics: The Adventure of Pedagogy'

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (National Society for Education in Art and Design, 2018-09-01)
      Book review of Dennis Atkinson's 'Art, disobedience and ethics: The adventure of pedagogy',
    • Bringing languages to life: a longitudinal study of the development of creative practice in student teachers of modern languages

      Hulse, Bethan; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-12-29)
      This article reports the findings of a longitudinal study exploring the process of learning to teach modern languages in the changing landscape of teacher education. It employs a postmodern critical ethnographic methodology to examine the experiences of a group of student teachers over the course of a one-year postgraduate teacher education programme in England. The focus is on how experiences in university and in school encourage or discourage the development of creativity. The schools inspectorate, Ofsted, is critical of lifeless teaching which fails to inspire young people to learn languages. However, the pressures of ‘performative’ requirements act as a discouragement to creativity. The data indicates that whilst student teachers express a desire to be more creative, they find it difficult to implement their ideas in school. A post-structuralist analysis of Marx’s theory of alienation is employed to argue that the early formation of professional identity is a process of acquiescence to oppressive external structures over which individuals have no control. The study concludes that it is possible to create spaces where the temporary suspension of alienation can allow individuals to put life back into language learning.
    • The challenges of developing future leaders of Community Colleges and beyond

      Lambert, Steve; University of Chester (University of New Brunswick, 2015)
      Ensuring there are sufficiently skilled and experienced individuals to become leaders within various departments of community colleges (and beyond) is vital in order to secure the future of education in these institutions.
    • Challenging Convention(s): Methodological Explorations in Contemporary Qualitative Inquiry

      Garratt, Dean; University of Chester (SAGE, 2015-03)
      Based on a recent inaugural lecture, this article presents a critical appreciation and analysis of the application of different research methodologies to selected social and educational research contexts. The analysis is set against the backdrop of an ontological question concerning the possibility of truth. Specifically, it seeks to explore the untenability of any notion of absolute truth in contemporary qualitative inquiry, and examine the corollary implications for determining the nature, role and status of research. It is argued that the ability to challenge convention offers both the possibility and productive capacity to unsettle dominant research methodologies, while also critiquing normative social and professional research practices. Utilising three contrasting methodological frameworks: Gadamerian hermeneutics; Foucauldian theory; and Lacanian psychoanalytic theory; the narrative follows a journey of personal development and shows how seemingly different and diverse theoretical perspectives can reveal critical new insights on contemporary social research issues and practices, cultures and communities.
    • Child abuse, child protection, and defensive ‘touch’ in PE teaching and sports coaching

      Piper, Heather; Garratt, Dean; Taylor, Bill; Manchester Metropolitan University ; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitan University (Taylor & Francis, 2013)
      This article discusses recently completed research on ‘no touch’ sports coaching, by placing it in a broader social context which problematises the way child abuse and child protection (or safeguarding) are conceived and discussed in terms of policy and practice. It also provides a brief indicative summary of the research findings and offers a discussion of moral panic, risk society and worst case thinking, before drawing on Foucault's work on governmentality to offer an explanation of how the current situation arose.
    • Children and technology

      Blythe, Katrina; Bennett, Richard; Hamill, Andrew (Nash Pollock Publishing, 1996)
      This book offers suggestions and examples on how teachers can use technology for teaching at key stages 1 and 2.
    • Children's history of Chester

      Pickford, Anthony; University of Chester (Hometown World, 2010)
      This book investiages the people and events that have defined Chester.
    • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Mohr Siebeck, 2016-11-01)
      An introduction to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and their place in Religious Education
    • Citizenship education and philosophical enquiry: Putting thinking back into practice

      Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitian University (SAGE, 2012-03)
      This article proposes a purposeful re-introduction of philosophical enquiry to the process and pedagogy of citizenship education.
    • Collaboration in Arts Education

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-10-27)
      The merits of collaborative learning through the arts are immediately obvious: many of the arts physically lend themselves to shared contributions and joint productions –theatre, dance, murals, singing, textiles, graphics, design and printing, to name only the first to spring to mind. Underpinning each of these are social and communal learning: how to be together, and share in an enterprise. This is turn feeds into the idea of a democratic society where the learner is not only acquiring knowledge and skills, but also an understanding of what it is to be a citizen; it is hard to overestimate how important being well socialised at an early age is to the coherence of a functioning civic society. Given the seemingly obvious advantages of such an education, and the equitable society that it is designed to support, it is troubling that collaborative education, and with it arts education, is increasingly neglected in favour of individual and competitive learning.