• Art and Design as Agent for Change

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2018-11-25)
      Editorial for a special conference issue of the journal. The iJADE conference in November 2017 took place in the National College of Art and Design (NCAD) in Dublin. The conference theme chosen was ‘Art and design as agent for change’, since social justice has become a growing focus for many educators and practitioners in the visual arts, and the idea of art and design education having agency in the process of social chance has gained traction. All of the papers in this issue are written by delegates from the conference who, by popular demand, were invited to write up their presentations for publication in the journal.
    • Art and empowerment

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2019-02-13)
      Editorial discussing local art communities in Bethlehem and Liverpool empowering artists and students by supporting them and exhibiting their work.
    • Collaboration in Arts Education

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-10-27)
      The merits of collaborative learning through the arts are immediately obvious: many of the arts physically lend themselves to shared contributions and joint productions –theatre, dance, murals, singing, textiles, graphics, design and printing, to name only the first to spring to mind. Underpinning each of these are social and communal learning: how to be together, and share in an enterprise. This is turn feeds into the idea of a democratic society where the learner is not only acquiring knowledge and skills, but also an understanding of what it is to be a citizen; it is hard to overestimate how important being well socialised at an early age is to the coherence of a functioning civic society. Given the seemingly obvious advantages of such an education, and the equitable society that it is designed to support, it is troubling that collaborative education, and with it arts education, is increasingly neglected in favour of individual and competitive learning.
    • Desperate Journeys

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2019-05-02)
      At a time of endemic xenophobia some artists have attempted to resistance by depicting its damaging consequences, revealing the inequalities that fuel its disfigurement of human relations and discourse, and which have now resulted in mass human displacement. Paul Dash’s recent paintings of refugees attempting dangerous and degrading sea crossings are the main subject of this paper, and these works are discussed in the context of his negative educational experiences as a child, and his salvation through painting in the sanctuary of his school’s art room. This school experience and the trajectory of his artistic career are contextualised by the current marginalisation of the arts in the curriculum and the increasing scarcity of critical and creative approaches to education.
    • Editorial: Young children and art education

      Adams, Jeff; Atherton, Frances; University of Chester (Wiley, 2018-02-09)
      This special issue of iJADE is devoted to the art education of young children, and provides a timely platform for the dissemination of new research in this important area. For many young children their artistic experiences can prove to be some of the most profound and insightful of their early education. Although these creative moments are frequently integrated with a multitude of other educational experiences, nonetheless the artistic ones have a singularity, making them unique within the educational experience as a whole. It is the predominance of a visual epistemology that provides this specificity, and it hardly needs stating that knowing by means of the visual is of profound importance in our contemporary societies. The demonstration and the parole of this ‘knowing’ by young children should not be seen as peripheral, or as an adjunct to education. Fundamental to a well-informed art education are the critical expression of meaning and purpose, no matter how tentative these might appear. These practices entail a critical engagement with the languages of visual imagery, to which children readily adapt.
    • Finding Time to Make Mistakes

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2014-02-17)
      The place of the creative arts in the school curriculum is sometimes fiercely contested, but across the world they have enduring importance and there is a wide consensus over their value for general education. However, there has been a tendency of late to rely on an economic justification for their place in the curriculum. A key problem with this strategy is that many of the economic arguments may prove false, as was pointed out by Grayson Perry in one of his BBC Reith lectures, where he pointed out those studying arts subjects are often at the bottom of the economic table for future earnings potential. Grayson does go on to say, however, that this is should be a ‘cause for celebration’, since the enduring popularity of arts courses implies that people still want to go to study art despite the lack of an economic incentive, testament to the values of art education. This draws our attention to the nature of creative experimentation, of finding time to make mistakes, which is of great importance to pedagogy in the arts, reminding us of those other purposes of education that once seemed so fundamental, prior to onset of economic and market dogmas.
    • The Critically Designed Garden.

      Adams, Jeff; Hyde, Wendy; University of Chester (Wiley, 2018-08-08)
      This article is concerned with design applied to gardens, using examples from the Chelsea Flower Show in London. There is a discussion of those show gardens that represented Syrian refugees’ gardens in Iraq and the Windrush generation immigration to the UK. The garden designs combine the aesthetics of organic materials and spatial architecture with an implicit critique of topical contemporary social issues. The article concludes by commenting on the risks posed by the reduced and impoverished UK arts education policies for producing the next generation of applied design practitioners.
    • The Question of Cost is Irrelevant

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2016-02-24)
      Herbert Read’s belief in the fundamental importance of education to human culture and society, and with it the subordination of economics to state education, might sound extraordinary to us now. This is especially true for those of us in England defending the place of the arts in the education curriculum in an era of political thought defined by the ascendency of neoliberalism. What were once common philosophical ideals rooted in the confidence of an expanding democratic citizenship, might today be interpreted as profligacy, and the arts in education have become marginalised and subordinated under this malign influence in England. Mantras such as ‘value for money’ have become the condition of all practical and intellectual endeavour, and the creative imperatives of children, as well as those of us who practise as educators and artists, are suffering the consequences, the most damaging of which is our inadvertent complicity in the concept of the arts-as-service.
    • Touched by Turner

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester; Professor of Education at the University of Chester, and is Principal Editor of the International Journal of Art & Design Education . At Chester he is leader of the Doctorate in Education (EdD) programme, and co-director of the research centre for creativity in education, RECAP. (Wiley, 2015-02-15)
      This is a personal reflection on an encounter with the works of the nineteenth-century painter J. M. W. Turner in London’s Tate Britain exhibition ‘Late Turner: Painting Set Free’. The article discusses the deeply subjective nature of engaging with artworks, and touches upon theories that might account for the ineffable but moving experiences that sometimes occur in such situations, often unexpectedly, and analyses the associations that might prompt them – in this case the details of dogs in some of Turner’s works. There is a discussion of the theoretical frameworks that may provide an insight into these deeply subjective, personal and yet significant encounters, and how they can provide a means to a richer understanding of an artwork. The article considers the conditions that might be conducive to these contemplative, affective experiences, and how they might occur in educational settings with appropriate forms of pedagogy. The article concludes by contrasting slow, idiosyncratic and subjective learning through artworks, with the dominant, data-based and reductive trends that currently prevail in mainstream education.
    • Young children and art education

      Adams, Jeff; Atherton, Frances; University of Chester (Wiley, 2018-02-09)
      Editorial for a special issue of the Journal on young children and art education.