• Bringing languages to life: a longitudinal study of the development of creative practice in student teachers of modern languages

      Hulse, Bethan; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-12-29)
      This article reports the findings of a longitudinal study exploring the process of learning to teach modern languages in the changing landscape of teacher education. It employs a postmodern critical ethnographic methodology to examine the experiences of a group of student teachers over the course of a one-year postgraduate teacher education programme in England. The focus is on how experiences in university and in school encourage or discourage the development of creativity. The schools inspectorate, Ofsted, is critical of lifeless teaching which fails to inspire young people to learn languages. However, the pressures of ‘performative’ requirements act as a discouragement to creativity. The data indicates that whilst student teachers express a desire to be more creative, they find it difficult to implement their ideas in school. A post-structuralist analysis of Marx’s theory of alienation is employed to argue that the early formation of professional identity is a process of acquiescence to oppressive external structures over which individuals have no control. The study concludes that it is possible to create spaces where the temporary suspension of alienation can allow individuals to put life back into language learning.
    • Challenging Convention(s): Methodological Explorations in Contemporary Qualitative Inquiry

      Garratt, Dean; University of Chester (SAGE, 2015-03-01)
      Based on a recent inaugural lecture, this article presents a critical appreciation and analysis of the application of different research methodologies to selected social and educational research contexts. The analysis is set against the backdrop of an ontological question concerning the possibility of truth. Specifically, it seeks to explore the untenability of any notion of absolute truth in contemporary qualitative inquiry, and examine the corollary implications for determining the nature, role and status of research. It is argued that the ability to challenge convention offers both the possibility and productive capacity to unsettle dominant research methodologies, while also critiquing normative social and professional research practices. Utilising three contrasting methodological frameworks: Gadamerian hermeneutics; Foucauldian theory; and Lacanian psychoanalytic theory; the narrative follows a journey of personal development and shows how seemingly different and diverse theoretical perspectives can reveal critical new insights on contemporary social research issues and practices, cultures and communities.
    • Citizenship education and philosophical enquiry: Putting thinking back into practice

      Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitian University (SAGE, 2012-02-21)
      This article proposes a purposeful re-introduction of philosophical enquiry to the process and pedagogy of citizenship education.
    • Diversity and inclusion in early childhood: An introduction

      Devarakonda, Chandrika; University of Chester (SAGE, 2014-03-18)
      This book offers an overview of current research, policy and practice in diversity and inclusion in the early years.
    • Psychoanalytic-autoethnography: troubling natural bodybuilding

      Garratt, Dean; University of Chester (SAGE, 2014-08-20)
      This paper presents a psychoanalytic-autoethnography of embodied masculinity. It examines the sport of competitive natural bodybuilding as a means to pursue relevant ontological questions as part of a wider philosophical project. The embodied narrative addresses three overlapping themes: an examination of the discourses defining a crisis of masculinity relating to an evolving body project; an analysis of the subject’s ambivalence towards the spoken ideal of ‘physical culture’ while imagining other forms of desire and risk taking practices; an analytic autoethnographic account of a competitive body experiencing temporal feelings of ‘loss’, reflecting on fragmentary experiences connected to socially conditioned roles. Enframed by psychoanalytic theory, the analysis draws inspiration from the work of Lacan and supporting cast of Butler, Kristeva and Agamben.
    • Queer and Uncanny: An Ethnographic Critique of Female Natural Bodybuilding

      Garratt, Dean; University of Chester (SAGE, 2015-03-26)
      This article presents an ethnographic critique of the corporeal experiences of women as self-proclaimed natural bodybuilders. Drawing on detailed ethnographic work and interviews with 10 female naturals, a bricolage of multiply gendered identities and affiliations is produced. The analysis questions how in working to a “natural ethic,” while desiring a “deviant aesthetic,” the female bodybuilder is paradoxically repressed by a “natural gendered order.” The narrative draws reflexively on psychoanalytic theory and transgendered perspectives, to examine the cultural concept: natural as a “queer” and “uncanny” paradox in which gender and identity are made and simultaneously dislocated.
    • Teaching primary English

      Brien, Jackie; University of Chester (SAGE, 2012-02-22)
      This book discusses what teachers of literacy know and do; speaking and listening; reading for understanding; teaching phonics for reading and writing; learning and teaching writing; accuracy and presentation; inclusive learning and teaching of English, the use of ICT in teaching English; assessment; and English and literacy beyond the classroom.
    • The role of policy transfer in assessing the impact of American ideas on British social policy

      Hulme, Robert I.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2006-08-01)
      This journal article assesses the contribution of existing work on policy transfer to the understanding of policy change on the international stage.
    • Understanding Schemas and Young Children from birth to three

      Atherton, Frances; Nutbrown, Cathy; University of Chester; University of Sheffield (SAGE, 2013-04-30)
      This book explores young children's learning and development through the identification and understanding of their schemas, repeatable patterns of behavior and thought (Athey 2007).
    • Understanding schemas and young children: From birth to three

      Atherton, Frances; Nutbrown, Cathy; University of Chester (SAGE, 2013-04-30)
      This book focuses specifically on schemas and children under three. The authors trace the development of schemas from motor level through to symbolic representation, and show hot to use schema theory to understand young children's learning and behaviour.