• A review of: Selling Folk Music: An Illustrated History, by Ronald D. Cohen and David Bonner.

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester; Storyhouse (Canterbury Christ Church University, 2018-06-01)
      A review of the book, Selling Folk Music: An Illustrated History. Ronald D. Cohen and David Bonner. (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2018. ISBN 978-1-62846-215-9
    • An exploration of the tension between tradition and innovation.

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester and Storyhouse (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018-08-01)
      This chapter will present an exploration of the tension between tradition and innovation. Terms and meanings will first be defined and delineated. Tradition will be delineated by way of a consideration of folk culture in extremis, and innovation by way of a personological understanding of creativity, again in extremis. The exploration will take place within a framework expounded by folklorist Bausinger in ‘Folk culture in a world of technology’ (Bausinger, 1961). By revisiting his concepts, and utilising his notions of spatial expansion, temporal expansion and social expansion as lenses, I will reconsider folk culture, and the relationships it has with multi-dimensional topological theories of creativity in a world of digital technology. Several tensions extant in the concept of culture have been posited by previous writers, such as Elliot (1948), Dundes (Dundes, 2002), and Dewey (Dewey, 1938). These tensions are often seen as dichotomies, divisions or contrasts, which are represented as being opposed or entirely different, as a binary construct. Such constructs might serve the creative practitioner better if reframed instead as spectrums of tension. These two extremes, existing in a state of equilibrium, might benefit the creative practitioner, creative act and culture and society more broadly. Exploring these tensions, will make help contribute to the themes and discourses of creativity and culture. Reconsidering each expansion will in turn present new perspectives and ways forward, through the examination of the supposed tensions, and the values and ideas that each expansion deals with. The chapter concludes with thoughts on what the ramifications of these tensions might be; and on the implications for future creative and traditional practice: I am mindful here of the purpose of Bausinger’s original concepts concerned with uncovering new folkloric perspectives and potential standpoints. The chapter therefore has three aims, first to propose an alternative way of being, and knowing the world, that suggests by connecting with, or knowing the past and our cultural traditions, practitioners, professionals or workers can engage in a more personally and socially meaningful creative practice in the digital world. A secondary aim is to reflect upon how this standpoint promotes identity formation and broader social cohesion. And, finally how it might in itself represent a folk realpolitik.
    • Applied fantasy and wellbeing

      Wall, Tony; MacKenzie, Anna; Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester and Storyhouse (Springer, 2019-10-01)
      Applied Fantasy is a new, innovative approach to wellbeing that demonstrates the significant potential within fantasy literature and media to provide effective and sustainable coping strategies for positive mental health. Emerging at the intersection of fantasy literature and media, mental health and wellbeing, and fan studies, the benefits from Applied Fantasy are two-fold. First, the concept of an individual being part of a wider fandom is a positive step towards a) combating isolation and b) subverting the stigma surrounding mental health; and second, the contents of the fantasy works themselves provide solid examples and guidance on how to manage mental health concerns while not overtly discussing coping strategies for mental health.
    • Celia

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      A sestina poem - one of 6 - published in Life Lines
    • Creativity

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      An editorial for the Education journal Cornucopia on the theme of Creativity
    • Ekphrastic Poetry Writing

      Poole, Simon E.; Storyhouse and University of Chester
      An chapter in the Erasmus Plus EU: Beyond Text Partnership eBook entitled: Ekphrastic Poetry Writing. In the book edited by Benmergui, R., Owens, A. & Passila, A.
    • Folk Culture in the Digital Age: The Emergent Dynamics of Human Interaction

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-01-13)
      A review of Folk Culture in the Digital Age: The Emergent Dynamics of Human Interaction for the journal Folklore.
    • How Music Accessibility can be used in Art Based Research experiences

      Solé, Lluis; Poole, Simon E.; Storyhouse and University of Chester
      Arts-based Research (ABR) ‘can be defined as the systematic use of the artistic process, the actual making of artistic expressions in all of the different forms of the arts, as a primary way of understanding and examining experience by both researchers and the people that they involve in their studies’ (Knowles & Cole, 2008, p. 29). However, music is an art form that in Western culture, the practice of which is usually restricted to a few individuals with specific skills. Commonly, musical activities are left out of ABR works because of the inherent difficulties of the musical process. In this article, we review and provide multiple ways of how, through accessibility processes, music can be made by a wide range of participants regardless of their musical knowledge. The argument is made that the ways of accessibility presented open up the possibilities of using a wide-ranging use of participatory musical activities in research inquiries, assessment and evaluation. This chapter thus focuses on the ways in which music making can be made accessible and so increase the possibilities of its use partially or entirely as a provocation for inquiry, in collecting and analysing data, as a means of dissemination in research, assessment and evaluation processes.
    • Informal Music-Making and Well-Being

      Solé i Salas, Lluís; Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester and Storyhouse (Springer, 2019-09-26)
      In order to define the nature of informal music, specifically music making and its multidimensional connections with one’s wellbeing. A brief history of how music making is understood is first offered in order to delineate associated research, and music learning models. It is hoped that this will provide some detailed definition of the contemporary context of music making, so that the approach of ‘Universal Design’, amongst others, in the making of music might be understood as a paradigm shift that might have benefits for wellbeing. Informal music making is in short defined as categorically separate from formal music making, but their overlapping and dynamic relationship is nonetheless recognised and also further expanded upon. Informal music making is also aligned to understandings of the intuitivist and rationalist composer.
    • Innovation

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      An editorial for the Education journal Cornucopia on the theme of Creativity
    • Kindly Apparitions: Reflections upon Reflections

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-10-01)
      Individuals Connecting to a Collective Spirit, illustrates individually focused writing practices to create new meanings, understandings, or relationships with something, including themselves.
    • Mind the gap: Identifying barriers to students engaging in creative practices in Higher Education

      Solé i Salas, Lluís; Sole-Coromina, Laia; Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester and Storyhouse
      Creativity is nowadays seen as a desirable goal in higher education. In artistic disciplines, creative processes are frequently employed to assess or evaluate different students' skills. The purpose of this study is to identify potential pitfalls for students involved in artistic practices in which being creative is essential. Three focus groups involving Education Faculty members from different artistic disciplines allowed for the identification of several constraints when creativity was invoked. This initial study used a quantitative approach and took place in the ‘Universitat de Vic’ (Catalonia, Spain). Findings suggest a correlation with existing literature and simultaneously point at some nuances that require consideration: emerging aspects embedded in creative processes that may help decrease some limiting effects that being creative can generate. The main limitations of this research derive from the very nature of the methodological approach. Focus group has been the single used source. Other means of collecting data, such as the analysis of programs, could be used in the future. This case study, while culturally specific, offers a useful insight into the potential of further work in non-artistic disciplines but crucially across disciplines. It has tremendous value for the development of intercultural understanding in the HE sector, specifically in terms of assessment.
    • National arts and wellbeing policies and implications for wellbeing in organisational life

      Poole, Simon E.; Scott, C.; Storyhouse and University of Chester
      There is general agreement nowadays of the value of the arts to our health and wellbeing, for instance, personal experience of music to lift depression, words to express our lived emotions, the aesthetic quality of a work of visual art that can take us to deeper understanding. The arts include a “broad and diverse landscape of interrelated creative practices and professions, including performance arts (including music, dance, drama, and theatre), literary arts (including literature, story, and poetry), and the visual arts (including painting, design, film) (see UNESCO 2006)” (Wall T, 2019; p. 1). For many, their relevance to mental and physical health is a given, to sustain, to prevent deterioration, or to improve the healing process. An appreciation of their value to health and wellbeing is often due to specific personal experience. Indeed, as Victoria Hume, Director of Arts Council England’s Culture Health and Wellbeing Alliance stated in an interview, (July 2020), “People get it when they’ve done it”, observing that it is a “slow, iterative process of building champions” who are conveying the necessary messages that shift attitudes. The event of the pandemic and lockdown in 2020 has caused many to consider again their priorities and how they can better sustain their own situations, as Dr Clive Parkinson, international arts and health advocate, Director of Arts for Health at Manchester Metropolitan University UK, and Visiting Fellow at the University of New South Wales Australia, observed (July 2020) “The importance of culture and the arts in all their forms, to impact of health, wellbeing and social change, has never felt so relevant”.
    • Opening Words

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      An edited collection of Short Stories for children, with an editorial.
    • Playing with Ekphrasis

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester (2017-05-30)
      Inspired by Walter Benjamins response to a painting by Klee, 'Playing with Ekphrasis' is an anthology that deals with the tensions between community and identity. Using photographs of nature I've taken throughout my life, each exhibited photograph has an accompanying QR code so the viewer can also hear the poem. There is also a publication that embodies all of this process.
    • Psychogeography and Well-Being

      Scott, Clare; Marichalar-Freixa, Eva; Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester; Storyhouse (Springer, 2018-11-20)
      A psychogeographical understanding offers a contemporary view that can be concerned with finding personal connections with place; an expression of political dissent; an expression of spirituality; or a documentation and consideration of a journey. It could also be an amalgamation of any of these to greater or lesser degrees. This understanding considers the historical significance of the flâneur, the dérive, psychogeography, from the urban to the rural, and how it has and will have, significant impact on self-efficacy, self-esteem, community, identity, landscape, and above all sustainability today and tomorrow.
    • Rancière and the demise of the book

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester; Storyhouse Chester (NAACE: The Education Technology Association, 2018-02-02)
      This paper is concerned with the future of the physical book, and everything we know and perhaps hold dear about it as an object. As something treasured, stored, loved and remembered. It draws as inspiration and data upon a question posed by Preston (2014): ‘Is the demise of the book imminent?’, and the debate held by members of Mirandanet over a couple of days in response to the question. It is a paper that deals with the books hypothetically anachronistic existence within the digital world of technology. Through the identification and exploration of the benefits and drawbacks of Rancière’s theoretical approaches, their relevance to social issues will be highlighted through a folkloristic perspective. Given this relevance, Rancière’s ideas are applied to the field of educational theory and practice, and an interpretation of ‘the demise of the book’ is offered.
    • Re/searching for ‘Impact’

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester; Storyhouse, Chester. (Emerald Publishing, 2017-12-04)
      As an exploration of how ‘impact’ might be reconsidered, it is suggested that current contemporary understandings of 'impact' fail practice and research by obscuring the space for reflexive criticality that is crucial for an individual or organisation to flourish. That it thus leads to an already predefined enculturated understanding of ‘impact’. Offering some interrogation and folkloristic analogy of the meaning of ‘impact’, three brief expositions of differing arts-based práxes concerned mainly with reflection and connection, are then discussed through the lens of Ricœur’s (Ricœur, Reagan, & Stewart, 1978) conflation of the hermeneutical process with phenomenology. It is suggested that the implications of restoring, refreshing, or representing ‘impact’ give license to a personal/professional revitalisation, and that reformulating an understanding of ‘impact’ through re/search might offer a potential pedagogic tool, and alternative organising feature. Through the introduction of inter-disciplinary thinking and práxes, the article offers novel autoethnographic arts-based methods for personal, professional and organisational development and growth.
    • A review of: ‘Workers’ Tales: Socialist Fairy Tales, Fables, and Allegories from Great Britain.

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      A review of the book: Workers’ Tales: Socialist Fairy Tales, Fables, and Allegories from Great Britain
    • Sparrows on the Roof

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester (Soil Records, 2016-08-16)
      Sparrow on the Roof was written for multiple reasons. And has been performed at conferences including keynotes in the UK, and also workshops, and cultural sharing events further afield such as in Bethlehem, Palestine. The latter place being very much the inspiration.