• History and the global dimension

      Pickford, Anthony; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2008-09-01)
      This book chapter discusses how the global dimension can be incorporated in history activities at key stage 1 and key stage 2.
    • How Can It Be? Nietzsche, the Radical Water Practice of a Looked After Child, and the Established Order of the School

      Moran, Paul; University of Chester (Other Business Ltd, 2016-12-19)
      The death of God, announced by Nietzsche in Beyond Good and Evil (1886), and in his earlier works, has been hailed as a revolutionary turning point, at least in philosophical terms. More importantly, the same philosophical principle, announced in 1886, symbolically, culturally, politically and intellectually has come to represent an incision that fundamentally cuts out any metaphysical justification that ‘the order of things’, including, say, the economic and social order, is necessarily so, that is to say has been metaphysically given, as if ordained by God; and exposes in its place a complex, but at bottom, naked will to power; and also, therefore, that any such order of being is a fabrication of vested interests (Deleuze, 2006). The revolutionary significance of this finding, however, is not one of simply abstract and theoretical moment. Nietzsche’s critique of metaphysics tears apart, for example, as lived experiences, assumptions that divide the very corporeality of our individual and social being from the systems of knowledge and expectations, and of how and where we live from the construction and meaning of our individual and collective identities (Woodward, 2013). And yet there are circumstances, and perhaps this is mostly so when living outside an established order from which you derive your meaning, that render your status, your future, your security profoundly disturbing, with no point of remittance. In such circumstances – and these are the circumstances today most obviously of the refugee, the dispossessed, and the poor – the future is only tenable by being able to belong to whatever established order is necessary. Having the requisite skills, appearance, and basically mode of being to secure a job and somewhere to live are not very mysterious but necessary indications that being part of any such order has been effected. This paper explores these points in relation to an ethnographic study of looked after children over the course of around a year, focussing on one child in her reception year, at her local mainstream primary school. More generally, this serves as an illustration of how schools necessarily do the work of the symbolic order.
    • The impact of work based learning: A creative exploration of learners’ experience

      Scott, Deborah S. (University of Chester, 2019-03)
      The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the impact of work based learning through a creative exploration of learners’ experience. The impact expected in work based learning is at personal, professional and/ or organisational level, and might extend beyond the organisation, to social order. However, the nature and extent of impact is variable, and sometimes not evident at all. This variability and apparent lack of impact is of pedagogical and economic concern for all parties involved in the tripartite work based learning relationship: learners expect to perceive some benefit from undertaking such a course of study; higher education providers need to show relevance to the working world; organisations assume there will be operational or strategic outcome from their employees’ engagement in work based learning. Wider than this, the significance of learning of relevance to the United Kingdom’s productivity is articulated in the government’s Industrial Strategy (GOV.UK, 2017). The investigation takes a narrative research approach to explore the experiences of recent Masters graduates of a negotiated work based learning programme for distance learners. The data were analysed using the concepts of Thirdspace, equality, creativity, and critical reflection. The creation of play scripts is an innovative feature of this thesis, representing an interpretation of participants’ stories about their work based learning experience. This imagined embodiment of learners’ experience facilitated greater empathy and understanding, supporting a critical perspective on the nature of impact. Insights emerging from the research suggest that impact was experienced by all research participants, but varied in nature and extent due to factors such as employment position; self-confidence, self-perception and personal experience; the culture and economic position of the organisation. Some participants’ employment position supported their use of their work based learning to instigate organisational change. For others, a marginal employment position offered opportunity to use learning for professional development. However, marginalisation might also hinder impact beyond the personal when combined with other factors such as an organisation’s financial constraints, and might prevent enactment of emerging radical ideas about the social order. Even when impact was deep, it might not be overt. A further insight was that collaboration was significant in effecting impact. This investigation offers a new perspective on impact in the context of work based learning, which highlights the creative, subtle and emotional aspects. The findings prompt review of teaching, learning and assessment practice leading to identification of strategies to accommodate and support students’ performance and development.
    • Inclusion

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-09-04)
      Inclusion in the Secondary RE Classroom
    • Informal Music-Making and Well-Being

      Solé i Salas, Lluís; Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester and Storyhouse (Western States Folklore Society, 2019)
      In order to define the nature of informal music, specifically music making and its multidimensional connections with one’s wellbeing. A brief history of how music making is understood is first offered in order to delineate associated research, and music learning models. It is hoped that this will provide some detailed definition of the contemporary context of music making, so that the approach of ‘Universal Design’, amongst others, in the making of music might be understood as a paradigm shift that might have benefits for wellbeing. Informal music making is in short defined as categorically separate from formal music making, but their overlapping and dynamic relationship is nonetheless recognised and also further expanded upon. Informal music making is also aligned to understandings of the intuitivist and rationalist composer.
    • Inner Elf- Living Fairytale of Lapland

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Pulisaari, P.; Lukkarila, A.; Lapeenranta University, Hullo Poro Oy Ltd (Hullo Poro Oy Ltd, 2016-02-09)
      Inner Elf- Living Fairytale of Lapland was co-created through an arts-based research process led by Anne Passila and Allan Owens 17th-22nd October. The process surfaced the insights and local knowledge and understandings of the team selected by the company Hullo Poro Oy Ltd including Pirre Pulisaari, Anne Lukkarila and this was used to thread through progress the initial frames introduced by Passila and Owens of the elf in a yellow dress and the concept of Inner (s)elf. The fairytale provided the landscape and narrative or a new experience part company is creating in Lapland. Visitors from all over the world will be introduced through it the culture of life up above the Arctic Circle.
    • Inspection and External Audit Mechanisms

      Lambert, Steve; University of Chester
      Inspection and audit can broadly be defined as the external scrutiny by interested parties. This could be from government or public organizations such as funding agencies which are seeking assurances that public money is being used appropriately and services provided are to the requisite standard. Public services have always been the subject of external scrutiny and education is no exception from this. As traditional deliverers of services, local authority areas (equivalent to districts) gradually became commissioners of services due to continued pressure on public finances. Subsequently, inspection and audit have played a more central theme in ensuring organizations are fulfilling their responsibilities. This entry considers the need for inspection and audit in the delivery of education. In doing so the entry will first explore the development of the policy landscape that has resulted in a culture of inspection and audit, before considering the accountability frameworks which go with it.
    • Interfaith Dialogue: A Way Forward in Setting Ground Rules

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (2012)
      This article examines briefly the various polemic and polite exchanges between Evangelicals and Latter-day Saints. It suggests that these exchanges are asking the wrong questions, and beginning from an incorrect basis. Within Latter-day Saint circles the questions has tended to be how: “How do other faiths relate to use?”, where actually, understanding how they view other faiths will enable Latter-day Saints to frame their questions and responses better. The article concludes with a suggestion for ground rules to enable the burgeoning dialogue to move forward at a pace.
    • Introduction

      Pope, Deborah; University of Chester (Learning Matters, Sage, 2019-10-12)
      The introductory chapter provides the theoretical framework of subject knowledge for primary teaching that is then adopted through the remainder of this edited volume.
    • Is Ender a Mormon?

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Open Court, 2013-09-17)
      A discussion of the place of religion in the Ender's Saga by Orson Scott Card
    • Kindly Apparitions: Reflections upon Reflections

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-10-01)
      Individuals Connecting to a Collective Spirit, illustrates individually focused writing practices to create new meanings, understandings, or relationships with something, including themselves.
    • Learning across boundaries: Developing trans-professional understanding through practitioner enquiry

      Hulme, Robert I.; Cracknell, David; University of Chester (Routledge, 2013-04-02)
      This book chapter examines the value of practitioner inquiry in the development of common language and shared understanding for a group of mid-career professionals from a variety of public service backgrounds brought together in order to formulate and disseminate responses to the Every Child Matters (2003) agenda for integrating services for children.
    • Learning and Development Schemas: On Repeat

      Atherton, Frances; University of Chester (Nursery World, 2014-01-27)
      Remarkable capabilities are divulged in the most conspicuous ways as children play. This can lead the devoted and discerning observer into a deeper understanding of the intricate nature of young children’s thinking. In what they do, the language they use and the things they make as they play, children acquaint us with important aspects of their learning and development. Through careful observation, underlying patterns in thinking can emerge as children work on their schemas. With this in mind, the imperative for adults working with young children to sustain and nurture these forms of thought becomes ever more apparent.
    • Learning ICT in the arts

      Hamill, Andrew; University of Chester (David Fulton, 2006-06-31)
      This books discusses how the integration of ICT and arts teaching can benefit children's learning at the foundation stage, and key stages 1 and 2. Activities and resources are suggested.
    • Learning ICT in the humanities

      Pickford, Anthony; University of Chester (David Fulton, 2006-06-30)
      This book focuses on using ICT in the context of geography, history, and religious education.
    • Learning ICT with English

      Bennett, Richard (David Fulton, 2006-06-30)
      This book discusses how the integration of information and communication technology (ICT) and teaching English can benefit children's learning in the foundation stage and in key stages 1 and 2. Activities and resources are suggested.
    • Learning ICT with science

      Hamill, Andrew (David Fulton, 2006-04-30)
      This books discusses how the integration of ICT and science teaching can benefit children's learning at the foundation stage, and key stages 1 and 2. Activities and resources are suggested.
    • Learning to teach mathematics: navigating the landscape of teacher education

      Bamber, Sally (University of Chester, 2015-07)
      Metaphor provides a potentially powerful rhetorical device to help me to tell informed and persuasive stories about mathematics education. In this ethnographic study I consider key episodes that serve to exemplify the complex experience of Initial Teacher Education (ITE) students of secondary mathematics education. I use a narrative analysis to shine a spotlight on the experiences of six beginning teachers so that the metaphors in their stories expose the impact that separately situated sites of teacher education have upon their beliefs and behaviour as teachers. Tensions between school and university contributors to teacher education have been well documented over many decades, but recent policy changes in the nature of post-graduate ITE in England bring these issues to the fore. In this study, I consider the influences of school-based and university-based teacher educators upon the beliefs of student secondary mathematics teachers and interpret the students’ perceptions of these influences on their actions as novice teachers. My analysis is framed by a model of experience and education articulated by Dewey as well as a framework of representations of knowledge in a culture of education articulated by theorists concerned with the relevance of constructivism and situated cognition as theories of learning. In this study, disturbances and discontinuities relating to the location and culture of ITE, together with the development of ITE students’ professional knowledge are uncovered, warranting further research.
    • Leverage Leadership: A new paradigm for further education

      Lambert, Steve; University of Chester (Further Education Trust for Leadership, 2019-07-19)
      he purpose of this article is to review existing models of leverage leadership which are currentlyapplicable to schools to establish whether they are appropriate for further education colleges. Due to the complexities of the environment in which further education colleges operate and the scale of the organisations involved, models of leverage leadership have not currently been applied to this sector. The paper proposes that a new model Distributed Leverage Leadership is more suitable to further education colleges. Unlike existing models which are predicated on the head of the organisation adopting the principles of leverage leadership, Distributed Leverage Leadership suggests a shared responsibility between senior and middle leaders. The model is predicated on a notion of forensic analysis of data, regular observations of learning, building a culture of high expectations and accountability.
    • Leverage Leadership: Lessons from further education

      Lambert, Steve; University of Chester (Further Education Trust for Leadership, 2019-07-17)
      The purpose of this article is to review the models of leverage leadership which are currently available in the compulsory sector to establish whether the models are appropriate for post compulsory education, and in particular for general further education colleges. In addition the article explores how a further education institution has gone about implementing leverage leadership. The article does this through a series of semi-structured interviews with senior and middle leaders and teachers on the aspects that they have implemented. Due to the complexities of the environment in which further education colleges operate, models of leverage leadership have not yet been extensively applied to this sector. What was derived was the emphasis of leverage leadership has been placed on a shift in approach to seeking assurances around the quality of teaching, learning and assessment. Moreso, then the use of data, which the institution in this article recognises that they are still some way of achieving, within the spirit of the proposed model.