• The global dimension and foundation stage

      Devarakonda, Chandrika; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2008-09-01)
      This book chapter discusses how a global dimension to the foundation stage curriculum can provide opportunities for exploring relationships and issues at personal, local, and global levels.
    • The global transfer of policy

      Hulme, Robert I.; Hulme, Moira; Univesity of Chester ; University of Glasgow (2008-06-20)
      This book chapter contrasts 'policy transfer' and 'travelling and embedded policy'. Policy transfer helps to explain the use of knowledge from elsewhere in decision-making processes. Travelling and embedded policy sheds light on the complex relationships between supranational, cross-national, regional and sectoral influences on policy making. Examples of education policy are used to illustrate the processes of global social policy making. In doing so, the chapter offers a particular focus on how global social policy agendas are mediated or negotiated by policy communities and networks in producing 'local' policy settlements.
    • The Holy Ghost in Latter-day Saint ritual experience

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (International Journal of Mormon Studies, 2012)
      Pneumatology is not a word that is used within Mormon writings, but Mormon theology does elucidate a work of the Holy Ghost that is evident in the world and in the Church that can be explored. In examining a Latter-day Saint pneumatology one is faced with a paucity of specific material; with the exception of a small number of books the Holy Ghost has not been the subject of a systematic analysis. While being critically linked with other areas, the role of the Spirit in individual and institutional practice is an area which needs exploring in much greater depth than has been done previously. The extent to which the Holy Ghost has been ignored is exemplified in the writings of Davies; he argues that in certain aspects Mormonism can be seen to be distinctly binitarian concluding: …that, in the starkest and most unqualified of terms, the Holy Ghost or Holy Spirit has been of primary historical significance within practical Mormon living but of secondary importance within its technical theology (2009: 38, see also Davies, 2010). This article will explore a small area of pneumatology and leave many areas that will need further exploration elsewhere, . It will seek to place the Holy Ghost as central in the theology of ritual ordinances. It will suggest that while Latter-day Saints believe that outward ordinances are not salvific in themselves they are channels of the Holy Ghost, which is the active medium of the grace of Christ to make sanctification and exaltation possible.
    • The international movement of ideas and practices in education and social policy

      Ford, Neville J.; Hulme, Robert I. (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2011-08)
      This thesis comprises eight publications produced between 2000 and 2009 in addition to a critical review of that work. The review considers the contribution made by the author to the perspectives on policy making offered by the framework of policy transfer and its subsequent applications within global social policy and related sub disciplines. It develops to explore the author's use of critical policy sociology and methodological work in social policy, education and political science in order to enhance existing perspectives on policy transfer. In contrast to rational linear models of decision making, alternative recursive deliberate approaches are suggested throughout this work. The review also considers aspects of the author's work on integrated working or trans-professionalism in the public services. Those aspects of his work on policy theory which illuminate professional learning are critically assessed.
    • The LGBT+ Pupil as the Abject: An Ethnographic Exploration of Subjectivity and Discourse in UK Secondary Schools

      Moran, Paul; Wright, Anne-Marie; Clark, Natalie E. (University of Chester, 2018-11-22)
      According to many scholars, schools are the last bastion of permitted homophobia (Beadle, 2009; Grew, 2008; as cited in Formby, 2013). Primarily using the theories of Foucault, Kristeva and Butler, the thesis uses critical theory as a means to both understand and critically analyse the construction of subjectivity within and throughout discourse in the hetero-/cis-normative institution, and how this related to the potential abjection of LGBT+ pupils. Whilst it is agreed in this thesis that LGBT+phobia is still widespread in both schools and wider society, it was found in this research that the impact of direct LGBT+phobic discrimination was less evident. Instead, the discursive spaces where LGBT+phobia had been silenced were filled with hetero-/cis-normative discourse. Concomitantly, the impact of LGBT+ invisibility, the silencing of positive discourse surrounding sexuality and the institutional rejection of performative LGBT+phobia without cultural or organisational change meant there remained a negative impact on LGBT+ young people, despite a reduction in visible LGBT+phobia (DePalma and Atkinson, 2006/2010). Through the use of short vignettes taken from a period of ethnographic research, I have used discursive reflexivity to offer an alternative discourse surrounding the LGBT+ pupil in the school. In a thesis preoccupied with language, the institutional denial of appropriate language, the lack of positive space for LGBT+ young people to construct their identity and the potential risk of abjection from the hetero-/cis-normative institution are all highlighted as points for discussion. Viewed through a critical theory lens, the exemplars used to illustrate these complex theories are chosen from 72 workshops undertaken in schools with Year Nine pupils over a the 2015 to 2016 academic year in the Merseyside region, and also from self-identified LGBT+ young people (also in Year Nine during the academic year 2015 to 2016), who were part of discussions in an LGBT+ Youth drop in based in Liverpool city centre. Intertwining academic analysis and philosophical reflection, the research finds that not only is the LGBT+ pupil abject in the school, but this abjection is threefold. It is enacted by the institution, the peer group and by the internalised LGBT+phobia of the abjected pupil. In the conclusion, it is reflected upon how the impact abjection from school continues to affect LGBT+ people into adulthood.
    • The Lore of the Landscape

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester (The Geographical Asociation, 2016)
      ‘Owd Ma, brought tha bowder down in ‘er pinny .’ In this article Simon Poole explores the complex relationship between people and landscape and provides food for thought as to the potential use of folk narratives about landscape as part of a creative geography curriculum I came across this remarkable piece of folklore recently from my home region of Cheshire, more specifically the region that is the magical sandstone ridge that divides the county in two like a sedimentary backbone. Folklore is one of those aspects of culture which is often forgotten, yet it permeates every individual and community: Like an accent or dialect, it is an impossibility not to have. And similarly to an accent or dialect it is always regionally located. Folklore lives organically within and as part of our cultures, changing and adapting as time passes, sometimes dying, sometimes being created or being reborn, nevertheless always carrying an individual or communities identity. It is a people’s cultural inheritance and as an oral tradition, folklore is passed on, and exists in many different forms, as: myths; legends; ballads; indeed as dialect; and as folktales. This is by no means an exhaustive list but it is the latter form which this article will be concerned with: The folktale.
    • The Neoliberal Educational “Imaginary” as experienced by a group of Primary School Headteachers

      Moran, Paul; Carr, Victoria L. C. (University of Chester, 2019-05-14)
      In this thesis I undertake a critical policy analysis in which I place education reform in the UK within the context of a changing social structure, transformed since the advent of neoliberalism in the 1970s, and examine the implications of reform on the role of primary school Headteachers. In particular, I situate my analysis within increased promotion of global economic competition and policy supported by neoliberal ideology in which the prevailing government seeks to retain legitimacy by claiming to institute reforms to improve education, whilst simultaneously reducing direct funding which is, in fact, destabilising it. Neoliberalism is a distinct political ideology that has flourished in the Western world over the last four decades and is based on theories of the free market; underpinned by economic efficiency, bureaucracy, rationality and measurable performativity. I look in detail at how the leadership of schools has changed, as a direct result of the implementation of new managerial instruments, and how resistance to these changes has been largely futile. Lacanian thinking would suggest that ideology which assumes education is a physical state that is inherently part of a democratic process, inextricably linked to politics, positively transformational and measurable, is in fact imaginary (Lacan, 2006). Our imaginary “order is embedded in the material word” and woven into the reality around us (Harari, 2012, p.127). It is within this ‘imaginary’ conceptualisation that my research is positioned. I present, and analyse, empirical data gathered from a number of primary school Headteachers from a range of contexts that outlines their lived experience as they attempt to navigate the, what could be described as, strongly surreal or ‘Kafkaesque’ (Löwy,1997) educational ‘imaginary’, as it is currently configured and, explore the efficacy of a forum that is used to support them as they therefore attempt the untenable. The significant issue of school context as an effect of how a school performs in testing regimes is substantial. It is clear that context greatly impacts on the extent to which Headteachers must shift their beliefs and practice to satisfy performative expectations. I conclude with an acknowledgement that to attempt to rationalise the educational ‘hyperreal’ without an appreciation of power and manipulation is impossible and, that the role of primary school Headteachers may only be plausible with the scaffold of forums such as the one examined within this research.
    • The personal benefits of musicking for people living with dementia: a thematic synthesis of the qualitative literature

      Dowlen, Robyn; orcid: 0000-0003-2982-7039; Keady, John; Milligan, Christine; Swarbrick, Caroline; Ponsillo, Nick; Geddes, Lucy; Riley, Bob (Informa UK Limited, 2017-09-08)
    • The Philosophy of Homelessness

      Moran, Paul; Atherton, Frances; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-08-06)
      A Philosophy of Homelessness is, in a number of respects, a ground-breaking work. It critically analyses the, for the most part, ordinary assumptions by which most of us in the developed world appear to live our daily, ordinary lives. These ordinary assumptions include rights of ownership, and the ability through ownership to fashion one’s own living environment, for example by being able to decorate, add to and modify one’s home, and therefore to express some agency about place, belonging and being; the capacity to engage in an economic system in such a way that allows a distance, an abstraction, a dissociation of the participant, including the participant’s body, from that which is being exchanged; as well as a more general ontology that identifies and establishes the personal, the private, the condition that this - whatever this might be - being mine, again, including one’s own body, and the intimate cradle of one’s self, and thus one’s soul. Our research about homelessness, we suggest, discloses these facets of our contemporary, mundane neoliberal experience as products of an economy of being that forges our beliefs and practices about who and what we are. This critical analysis, amounting to a philosophy, is engendered from the mundane experiences of a community of chronically homeless people; a community that we have known and been part of for over three years. For example: the taken for granted experiences of shopping and belonging are discussed through the prism of heroin dealers and addicts; the process of being a couple and wanting to have a family is understood via a homeless couple’s struggle to live together and have a baby; the attempt to achieve financial independence is discussed by way of enforcers who collect drug debts for organised criminals; and themes of intimacy and privacy are explored through the lives of homeless sex-workers. Whilst the daily events of the homeless people that populate this work are arresting enough in themselves, it is their implications, their ontological and political implications, that are most shocking and telling about the brutal and parlous state of contemporary first world society, and the growing number of marginalised and dispossessed that it begets. The appeal of this powerful work therefore extends beyond an ethnographic and sociological analysis of homelessness in urban Britain; it provides a concrete opening for those interested in a radical critique, at the quotidian level of realisation, of the current global crisis of neoliberal beliefs and forms of organization. There are no other books on the market that undertake this work in this intimate, gritty, disturbing and irreverent way. By way of structure it achieves this by foregrounding in each chapter the lives of specific homeless people, which illustrate and develop the themes of being homeless.
    • The Politics of Time on the Frontline: Street Level Bureaucracy, Professional Judgment, and Public Accountability

      Murphy, Mark; Skillen, Paul; University of Glasgow; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-05-05)
      This article reports on a study carried out on the impact of quality assurance mechanisms on street-level bureaucrats in Northern England (teachers, nurses and social workers). A key aim of the research was to explore the ways in which these mechanisms negotiate the much older regulatory function of time. The findings suggest that these mechanisms contribute to forms of time compression across professional activities, time compression in turn having consequences for professional judgement. The study explores the mechanisms via which this occurs, while also examining the implications of the research for debates about democracy, political regulation, and public sector management.
    • The Question of Cost is Irrelevant

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2016-02-24)
      Herbert Read’s belief in the fundamental importance of education to human culture and society, and with it the subordination of economics to state education, might sound extraordinary to us now. This is especially true for those of us in England defending the place of the arts in the education curriculum in an era of political thought defined by the ascendency of neoliberalism. What were once common philosophical ideals rooted in the confidence of an expanding democratic citizenship, might today be interpreted as profligacy, and the arts in education have become marginalised and subordinated under this malign influence in England. Mantras such as ‘value for money’ have become the condition of all practical and intellectual endeavour, and the creative imperatives of children, as well as those of us who practise as educators and artists, are suffering the consequences, the most damaging of which is our inadvertent complicity in the concept of the arts-as-service.
    • The role of policy transfer in assessing the impact of American ideas on British social policy

      Hulme, Robert I.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2006-08-01)
      This journal article assesses the contribution of existing work on policy transfer to the understanding of policy change on the international stage.
    • The UK National Arts Education Archive: Ideas and Imaginings

      Adams, Jeff; Bailey, Rowan; Walton, Neil; University of Chester; Huddersfield University; Goldsmiths College (Wiley-Blackwell, 2017-06-19)
      The National Arts Education Archive (NAEA) is housed and maintained by the Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP), managed by YSP coordinators and educators with a well-established volunteer programme. This year, 2017, as part of the celebrations of the YSP’s 40th anniversary, the Archive will hold its own exhibition entitled Treasures Revealed: a collection of items selected by people who have been involved in the Archive, whether as donors, volunteers, researchers, artists, trustees or steering group members. In parallel with the exhibition, this paper aims to give voice to a selection of individuals and groups associated with the Archive, discussing their interests and experiences of it, and their thoughts on its value and importance as a repository of arts education materials, ideals and practices. Our primary motivations were to consider these different voices in relation to the purpose, direction and relevance of the NAEA today. These exchanges raise fundamental questions and debates about what art education is and what it might become, and how these historical collections, and creative engagements with it, might help to shape our contemporary thinking.
    • The use of process boards to support planning for grass roots coaching

      Tones, Steven; Keeley, Graham; Jones, Luke; University of Chester (Football Association, 2011)
      This article aims to provide support for grassroots coaches in planning or structuring a progressive sequence of learning activities and the use of process boards as a planning and coaching tool.
    • The ‘re‐imagining’ of evidence under New Labour: Policy and practice in education in uncertain times

      Hulme, Robert I.; Hulme, Moira; University of Chester ; University of Glasgow (Taylor & Francis, 2009-12-29)
      This article considers the relationship between evidence, policy and practice in education in England during the period of New Labour's governance.
    • “‘There's only one God, ma'am’- one God or many gods in the world of the Avengers”

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Open Court, 2018-08-30)
      This chapter will explore the nature of God within Captain America’s world and how much this draws on the ‘previous life’ of Captain Steve Rogers. It will do so, however, utilizing the exploration of the experience of Moses and the identification of God at the burning bush as a way to understand a worldview that accepts the existence of multiple deities, but with one supreme deity: ‘I am’. The chapter will then contrast this understanding with a Humean approach to the understanding of religion and the nature of God.
    • Tiered reciprocal learning and teaching in the context of physical education teacher education (PETE)

      Jones, Luke; Tones, Steven; Keskitalo, Vesa; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; University of Jyvaskyla (University of Limerick, 2011-06)
      This paper explores approaches to reciprocal learning and teaching and the impact or contribution for both trainee teacher and pupil learning.
    • Too hot to handle? A sociol semiotic analysis of touching in 'Bend it Like Beckham'

      Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; University of Chester; Manchester Metropolitan University (Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2016-07-12)
      This article examines the cinematic portrayal of touching and its politics in sports coaching, exploring how social interactions between coach and athlete are symbolically represented. The analysis focuses primarily on a well-known British-produced film, Bend it like Beckham (2002), in which scenes exhibit different forms of touching. The construction of intimate coach-athlete relationships captured through a series of filmed encounters is analysed through a social semiotic frame. This requires judgements about the authority, ‘reality-status’, and possibility of meaning arising from such representational practices. Attention is drawn to different moments of intimacy and/or sexual tension between the lead coach and central female characters, both on and off the pitch. Through a series of detailed interpretations, we show how the complexities involved in assigning intentionality in cinematic contexts serves both to assert and displace meaning. This further problematizes moral aspects of relations between coaches and athletes in tactile encounters, and especially so within the context of risk-averse safeguarding policies in sports coaching, a context characterised by increased prescription, proscription and disciplinary intervention during the years since the film was released.
    • Touched by Turner

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester; Professor of Education at the University of Chester, and is Principal Editor of the International Journal of Art & Design Education . At Chester he is leader of the Doctorate in Education (EdD) programme, and co-director of the research centre for creativity in education, RECAP. (Wiley, 2015-02-15)
      This is a personal reflection on an encounter with the works of the nineteenth-century painter J. M. W. Turner in London’s Tate Britain exhibition ‘Late Turner: Painting Set Free’. The article discusses the deeply subjective nature of engaging with artworks, and touches upon theories that might account for the ineffable but moving experiences that sometimes occur in such situations, often unexpectedly, and analyses the associations that might prompt them – in this case the details of dogs in some of Turner’s works. There is a discussion of the theoretical frameworks that may provide an insight into these deeply subjective, personal and yet significant encounters, and how they can provide a means to a richer understanding of an artwork. The article considers the conditions that might be conducive to these contemplative, affective experiences, and how they might occur in educational settings with appropriate forms of pedagogy. The article concludes by contrasting slow, idiosyncratic and subjective learning through artworks, with the dominant, data-based and reductive trends that currently prevail in mainstream education.
    • Tradition

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      An editorial for the Education Journal Cornucopia on the theme of Tradition