• Revisiting reciprocal learning and teaching with a focus on Key Stage 3 swimming

      Tones, Steven; Jones, Luke; University of Chester (Association for Physical Education, 2009)
      This article discusses a learning and teaching project between the University of Chester and two of its partnership schools. The project was about revisiting and reviewing the use of reciprocal approaches to learning and teaching swimming in the context of Key Stage 3 swimming.
    • ‘Safeguarding’ sports coaching: Foucault, genealogy and critique

      Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitan University ; Manchester Metropolitan University (Taylor & Francis, 2012-10-31)
      Focusing on swimming, this article offers a genealogical account of safeguarding in sport. Drawing specifically on Foucault's work, it examines the ‘politics of touch’ in relation to the social and historical formation of child protection policy in sports coaching.
    • Schematic pedagogy: supporting one child’s learning at home and in a group.

      Atherton, Frances; Nutbrown, Cathy; University of Chester; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2016-02-24)
      In this paper, we identify ways in which the learning of very young children can be supported by practitioners developing a schematic pedagogy which focuses on structures of children’s thinking. First, we provide a critical overview of relevant literature on schemas and schematic approaches to pedagogy. We then outline an original study undertaken to identify and support the learning of seven young children. Taking one child, whom we call Annie, we illustrate how her attention to the fine detail of elements of her home and group environments as she played offered strong clues to her pedagogues about her persistent interests (schemas). We show how careful observation by practitioners can be used to understand and support future learning encounters through a schematic pedagogy, and we consider implications of such an approach for practice in toddlers’ early learning.
    • Science

      Pope, Deborah; University of Chester (Learning Matters, Sage, 2019-10-12)
      The chapter explores and deconstructs the nature of subject knowledge for teaching primary science from integrated theoretical and practice-based perspectives.
    • Science and the global dimension

      Weavers, Jane; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2008-09-01)
      This book chapter dicusses how the global dimension of science can be incorporated into key stage one and key stage two theough the use of activities.
    • Scouse Pop

      Skillen, Paul (Equinox (Sheffield), 2018-10-29)
      Scouse Pop is a journey into the personalities and music of the successful pioneering Liverpool pop bands of the late seventies and eighties. It examines their motivations, their uniqueness and the routes to success which made them into enduring musical innovators. It looks at the reasons why art-pop bands such as OMD, China Crisis, Echo and the Bunnymen, Black and Frankie Goes to Hollywood managed to combine art and commerce with such spectacular success. The bands experienced their own 'revolutions in the head, ' internal revolutions than eventually made many of them household names. The development of these suburban romantics from Liverpool represented a period of intensive creativity and musical romanticism that still resonates today. The spirit of (internal) revolution at the heart of these bands retains a strong fascination for those interested in artistic creation and popular culture. Given the bleak and uninspiring context within which the bands surfaced, how did these musicians achieve great success? Scouse Pop explores this question in detail, and examines the factors that facilitated the transformation of Liverpool teenage dreams into commercial and cultural impact. The music industry, radio and DJs, producers and engineers, the record-buying public and the bands themselves comprise the heart of this account.
    • Scouse Pop TV Series 1 and 2 Bay TV

      Skillen, Paul (Bay TV, 2016-01-01)
      A series of TV interviews and live performances regarding creativity and difference in the music from Liverpool in the 1980s and 1990s.
    • Sharing something

      Owens, Allan (Chester College, 1995)
      This article discusses events leading up to and a performance of "After the ball is over" at Howard House, HM Prison Styal in Cheshire during July 1994.
    • Sparrows on the Roof

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester (Soil Records, 2016-08-16)
      Sparrow on the Roof was written for multiple reasons. And has been performed at conferences including keynotes in the UK, and also workshops, and cultural sharing events further afield such as in Bethlehem, Palestine. The latter place being very much the inspiration.
    • Sports coaches as ‘dangerous individuals’ - practice as governmentality

      Taylor, Bill; Piper, Heather; Garratt, Dean; Manchester Metropolitan University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2014-03-31)
      Recent concern surrounding sports coaches’ interaction with young people has reflected a fundamental change in the way coaches and others regard the role of sports. In this paper, we consider the identification and definition of the contemporary sports coach (whether acting in a professional or volunteer capacity) as, in Foucault’s term, a ‘dangerous individual’. We suggest that the mainstream discourse of child protection and safeguarding, variously interpreted and applied, has contributed to a culture of fear in sports coaching practice. Drawing on data from a recently completed Economic and Social Research Council-funded research project, we argue that contradictions in policy and practice, which serve to privilege a particular discourse, have cast the coach as both predator and protector of young sports performers. This has undermined the role of the coach, led to intergenerational fear, created doubt about coaches’ intentions and promoted their adoption of defensive and protective practices. Utilising the concept of governmentality, we argue that, as a consequence, fundamental trust-based relationships, necessary in healthy athlete−coach engagement, have been displaced by a discourse embodied in sterile delivery and procedure governed by regulation and suspicion.
    • Sports coaching in risk society: No touch! no trust!

      Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill; Garratt, Dean; Manchester Metropolitian University ; Manchester Metropolitian University ; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2011-08-22)
      This article discusses a UK based ESRC-funded research project which developed and deployed a case-study approach to issues of touch between children and professionals in schools and childcare, focusing on touch in sports coaching and its distinctive contextual and institutional characteristics.
    • Storyhouse Young Leaders: Evaluation Report

      Poole, Simon E.; Arya-Manesh, Emma; Owens, Allan; Adams, Jeff; University of Chester; Storyhouse; Oglesby Charitable Trust & Bank of America Merrill Lynch.
      An Evaluation Report of the Storyhouse Young Leaders Programme. Commissioned by Oglesby Charitable Trust & Bank of America Merrill Lynch written by RECAP.
    • Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Compassion

      Adams, Jeff; Atherton, Frances; Barton, Janet (University of Chester, 2016-04-30)
      Compassion has been associated with the nursing profession since the days of Florence Nightingale. It is a general expectation that nurses should be compassionate when they are caring for people. In the United Kingdom (UK) concerns have been raised recently that nurses are failing to be compassionate as they carry out their nursing duties. There is little evidence within the literature of how student nurses perceive compassion as they engage in the pre-registration-nursing programme. In this study, I use narrative to produce case studies as a vehicle for the students to voice their perceptions of compassion. My ethnographic analysis of their stories is framed by my own experience as a professional registered nurse and nurse educator situated within their learning environment, and applies theories of compassion and learning. In my study, themes emerge that demonstrate commonalities, differences and tensions relating to the students’ individual beliefs and behaviours, and to the impact of their professional development as they transcend from university learning spaces into clinical practice.
    • Subject knowledge for primary teaching: the influence of the personal dimension on beginning primary teachers’ conceptualisations and interpretations

      Pope, Deborah; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2018-02-13)
      This paper argues that professional discourse relating to subject knowledge for primary teaching is less than coherent in the context of initial teacher training (ITT). This study explored the ways in which the term subject knowledge was conceptualised and interpreted by beginning primary teachers. The research was conducted across two ITT partnerships with final-year undergraduate trainees. Data were collected via questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and participatory visual methods. The findings indicated that conceptualisations of subject knowledge were highly individualised and dependent on personal factors, rather than reflecting a shared understanding of a critically distinct concept.
    • Supporting the development of social policy in a Russian university through international online dialogue

      Hulme, Robert I.; Luchinskaya, Elena; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitan University (Peter Lang, 2007)
      This book chapter explores the use of computer-mediated communication and the use of reflective writing as part of an international professional learning project to establish a "Centre for Social Policy" at Udmurt State University in Russia between 2002 and 2005.
    • Sustainability in Arts Education

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016-10-13)
      Sustainability in the wider global context has increasingly required new political alignments, and this should not come as a surprise, given the corrosive social and environmental effects of rampant neoliberalism. Consequently those artists and arts educators with interests in sustainable practices find themselves on a political battlefield. Our 2015 conference, ‘Sustainability in Arts Education’, set out to discuss these matters and many more, and this issue of the Journal is devoted to invited papers from that event. The conference took place during November in Glasgow at the famous School of Art.
    • Sustainable leadership and its implications for the further education sector,

      Lambert, Steve; University of Hull
      The purpose of this article is to review the models of sustainable leadership which are currently available in the compulsory sector to establish whether the models are appropriate for post-compulsory education, and in particular for general further education colleges. Due to the complexities of the environment in which further education colleges operate, models of sustainable leadership have not been applied to this sector. In order to achieve this, leadership challenges for further education will be explored and the sector’s responses to these will be considered. Many of these challenges are based on government pressure for efficiency and effectiveness savings, and so will be contextualised in a new managerial framework. The article then goes on to examine current models of sustainable leadership, looking at whether they are applicable for general further education colleges. Should they not be appropriate, then a suggested model will be put forward which draws on the transferable components for existing models with additions which are appropriate to the post-compulsory sector.
    • Teaching and a Teacher’s Faith and Beliefs

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Springer, 2013-03)
      How does a teacher's beliefs affect their practise in the classroom?
    • Teaching primary English

      Brien, Jackie; University of Chester (SAGE, 2012-02-22)
      This book discusses what teachers of literacy know and do; speaking and listening; reading for understanding; teaching phonics for reading and writing; learning and teaching writing; accuracy and presentation; inclusive learning and teaching of English, the use of ICT in teaching English; assessment; and English and literacy beyond the classroom.
    • The Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley

      The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Holt, James D. (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2016)
      A devotional work used as a compilation of the teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley