• Raising of the participation age in the UK: The dichotomy between full participation and institutional accountability.

      Lambert, Steve; Maylor, Uvanney; Coughlin, Annika; University of Chester ; University of Bedfordshire ; University College London (Inderscience, 2015-06-17)
      At a time of mass youth unemployment in the UK, the introduction of the Raising of the Participation Age (RPA) policy advocates the benefits of a prolonged period of education for all young people. As part of the policy, accountability was placed on schools for its implementation, with government imposed destination measures being used as an indicator of the policy's success. This paper argues that RPA will have little impact on young people who are Not in Education, Employment and/or Training (NEET) and that the accountability for the policy's implementation is at best problematic and at worse fundamentally flawed.
    • Rancière and the demise of the book

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester; Storyhouse Chester (NAACE: The Education Technology Association, 2018-02-02)
      This paper is concerned with the future of the physical book, and everything we know and perhaps hold dear about it as an object. As something treasured, stored, loved and remembered. It draws as inspiration and data upon a question posed by Preston (2014): ‘Is the demise of the book imminent?’, and the debate held by members of Mirandanet over a couple of days in response to the question. It is a paper that deals with the books hypothetically anachronistic existence within the digital world of technology. Through the identification and exploration of the benefits and drawbacks of Rancière’s theoretical approaches, their relevance to social issues will be highlighted through a folkloristic perspective. Given this relevance, Rancière’s ideas are applied to the field of educational theory and practice, and an interpretation of ‘the demise of the book’ is offered.
    • Re/searching for ‘Impact’

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester; Storyhouse, Chester. (Emerald Publishing, 2017-12-04)
      As an exploration of how ‘impact’ might be reconsidered, it is suggested that current contemporary understandings of 'impact' fail practice and research by obscuring the space for reflexive criticality that is crucial for an individual or organisation to flourish. That it thus leads to an already predefined enculturated understanding of ‘impact’. Offering some interrogation and folkloristic analogy of the meaning of ‘impact’, three brief expositions of differing arts-based práxes concerned mainly with reflection and connection, are then discussed through the lens of Ricœur’s (Ricœur, Reagan, & Stewart, 1978) conflation of the hermeneutical process with phenomenology. It is suggested that the implications of restoring, refreshing, or representing ‘impact’ give license to a personal/professional revitalisation, and that reformulating an understanding of ‘impact’ through re/search might offer a potential pedagogic tool, and alternative organising feature. Through the introduction of inter-disciplinary thinking and práxes, the article offers novel autoethnographic arts-based methods for personal, professional and organisational development and growth.
    • Reaching from Behind: Sillamae

      Owens, Allan; University of Chester, Cumbria Local Education Authority (ETV National Estonian Television, 2014-11-18)
      ETV (Estonian Television National Channel) Interviewer and Arts Commentator Andrus Vaariku asks ‘Can Theatre Change the World?’ An Estonian National TV documentary focusing on three artists in three contexts: Contemporary Performance Practitioner Ene-Liis Semper, Applied Drama Practitioners Allan Owens & Katrin Nielsen ‘Hidden town: Silamae and Hendrik Toompere illusioonl Ugala Theatre Director UGALA.
    • Reading to create: Literature in the primary school

      Pearson, Henry; Chester College of Higher Education (Chester College of Higher Education, 1985)
      This pamphlet discusses the quality of books available for reading in the primary school and how the best use can be made of them.
    • Referral to Occupational Health: A Foucauldian discourse analysis of statutory documents and student nurses’ perceptions

      Massey, Alan (University of Chester, 2015-11)
      This study was carried out using a Foucauldian discourse analysis and involved the examination of three statutory reports into the provision of occupational health in the workplace. The reports analysed were the Report of the Select Committee on the Bill for the Regulation of Factories (1832); the Safety and Health at Work Report (1972); and Working for a Healthier Tomorrow (2008). Additionally, analysis was carried out on oral events with nursing students, which sought to understand their perceptions of referral to occupational health. The objective of this study is to explore how referral is constructed through discourse, categorising how this practice is constrained or liberated by specific discourses and how nursing students are positioned by these discourses. My study highlights both structural and subjective barriers to the use of occupational health. At the structural level, it is observed that referral to occupational health commenced as a form of governmentality, introducing dividing practices which subjected the workforce to forms of classification and surveillance. For those classified as healthy a culture developed within workplaces in which health behaviours needed to comply with the standards set down by occupational health and by the risk management approach. Risk management processes and stigmatisation are used to ensure compliance with the state’s wishes for a healthy and productive workforce. This trend is seen across the reports analysed, and is increased within the Black Report to the surveillance of health both in and out of the workplace for those of a working age. Subjectively, occupational health was identified as a disciplining and subjugating structure by the nursing students. The students evidenced notions of Cartesian duality in their discussions of the outcomes of referral, as they readily accepted surveillance of the body whilst seeking to avoid surveillance of their mental health capabilities. Through observation of architectural signs and organisational images of discourse, students categorised occupational health as an instrument of the higher education institute and not as a form of holistic health support. The research highlights how occupational health acts as a barrier to the students’ fulfilling their societal roles as good students and good nurses. The research also highlights a desire on the part of the student nurses to utilise occupational health within a public health framework which addresses their health in a preventative rather than punitive manner.
    • Reflections on learning: Widening capability and the student experience

      Garratt, Dean; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2011-06-24)
      This article argues for a more nuanced perspective on learning that takes account of the real and situated contexts of student experience. It is presented against a backdrop of the agenda to widen participation in higher education (HE) in the UK, which has led to a rise in students from non-traditional backgrounds entering into HE. Responding to this, an argument is made in favour of widening ‘capability’ in learning, to produce a more socially just pedagogy. Drawing on examples of the student learning experience a series of reflections is produced from an undergraduate programme of education studies.
    • A reflexive arts investigation: An examination of the shifting gendered identities of mother and daughter through psychodynamic and feminist discourses.

      Sampson-Chappell, Lynn (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2019-02)
      This research is the culmination of nine years of collaborative and individual arts practice with my daughter, using a range of collaborative and individual art practices to document the stages of my daughter’s development and learning through play and experimentation with art materials. The thesis is a lived enquiry which gives my daughter authorship as co researcher, offering a unique insight into her understanding and learning through arts practice. The arts practice provides a voice to the child, which has been lost to the performativity metrics of the school institution. The research acknowledges the multiple identities of the researcher, mother, artist and educator. As an artist I live and embody the creative and critical inquiry, as the researcher I respond to the culture of the research community and as an educator / mother I respond to others involved in the artistic inquiry. The practice-based thesis consists of two interconnected elements: an exhibition of art practice created by me and my daughter working both symbiotically and independently accompanied by a written account of the process. The art work is a collection of early drawings and experimental mark-making, photographs, screen prints, casts and embossed papers which trace my daughter’s emotional development as she navigates her infancy, latency and emerging adolescence. At the same time the Exhibition documents the parallel processes in me as an artist/teacher and mother of my only child, through her infancy, childhood and adolescence. The practice-based thesis illustrates that healthy separation is a crucial feature of normal development, emerging identity and the journey from dependence, interdependence to independence. The shared and individual arts practice creates an external representation of what is usually an internal, invisible emotional struggle as mothers separate from their children and children strive for their right to become adults independent of their parents. This iii transitional movement is visible in the art practice. Psychodynamic ideas such as the mother as an object and a container are explored as boundaries are maintained by the mother despite being challenged by the daughter; at first these challenges are resisted and then, reluctantly relinquished by the mother. The mother’s own childhood is inevitably present in the art work and the analysis. This thesis adopts an autobiographical, ethnographic and reflexive approach, consequently the findings can only be subjective. It exposes a highly personal journey which is both painful and joyful. It offers insights into how an artist/teacher/mother can engage with a developing child through providing a containing relationship in which shared arts practice reveals and exposes in painstaking detail how separation is navigated as an ongoing, dynamic process. The art itself explores in very concrete ways how boundaries are sometimes held firmly and how they sometimes move, how emerging identity evolves, fades, changes and is finally brought into sharp relief. A parent who herself is not contained will find it difficult to contain her child through the ordinary turbulence of childhood.
    • Religious Education

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Learning Matters, 2019-10-12)
      An exploration of pedagogical subject knowledge and the teaching of RE in the primary school
    • Religious education and the global dimension

      Fry, Carol; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2008-09-01)
      This book chapter discusses how the global dimension of religion can be incorporated into activities at key stage 1 and key stage 2.
    • Religious education in the secondary school: An introduction to teaching, learning and the world religions

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-12-01)
      Religious Education in the Secondary School is a comprehensive, straightforward introduction to the effective teaching of Religious Education in the secondary classroom. Acknowledging the highly valuable yet often misunderstood contribution of RE, this text shows how the subject can be taught in a way that explores the impact of religion on the lives of people and society, engaging pupils and preparing them to become individuals who celebrate and respect diversity. It is illustrated throughout with ideas for teaching at different key stages and offers expert chapters introducing you to both the World Religions and the core aspects of effective teaching and learning. With an emphasis on developing an understanding of the importance - and different ways - of meeting the learning needs of all pupils, key chapters cover: -Understanding different pedagogies of RE -Spirituality and RE -Tips on effective planning and assessment -An approach to teaching across the Key Stages -Core subject knowledge in Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism Written by an experienced teacher, teacher educator and examiner, Religious Education in the Secondary School is a succinct compendium and has a real classroom applicability offering all trainee RE teachers, as well as those teaching Religious Education as specialists or non-specialists a wealth of support and inspiration.
    • A review of: ‘Workers’ Tales: Socialist Fairy Tales, Fables, and Allegories from Great Britain.

      Poole, Simon E.; Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      A review of the book: Workers’ Tales: Socialist Fairy Tales, Fables, and Allegories from Great Britain
    • Revisiting reciprocal learning and teaching with a focus on Key Stage 3 swimming

      Tones, Steven; Jones, Luke; University of Chester (Association for Physical Education, 2009)
      This article discusses a learning and teaching project between the University of Chester and two of its partnership schools. The project was about revisiting and reviewing the use of reciprocal approaches to learning and teaching swimming in the context of Key Stage 3 swimming.
    • ‘Safeguarding’ sports coaching: Foucault, genealogy and critique

      Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitan University ; Manchester Metropolitan University (Taylor & Francis, 2012-10-31)
      Focusing on swimming, this article offers a genealogical account of safeguarding in sport. Drawing specifically on Foucault's work, it examines the ‘politics of touch’ in relation to the social and historical formation of child protection policy in sports coaching.
    • Schematic pedagogy: supporting one child’s learning at home and in a group.

      Atherton, Frances; Nutbrown, Cathy; University of Chester; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2016-02-24)
      In this paper, we identify ways in which the learning of very young children can be supported by practitioners developing a schematic pedagogy which focuses on structures of children’s thinking. First, we provide a critical overview of relevant literature on schemas and schematic approaches to pedagogy. We then outline an original study undertaken to identify and support the learning of seven young children. Taking one child, whom we call Annie, we illustrate how her attention to the fine detail of elements of her home and group environments as she played offered strong clues to her pedagogues about her persistent interests (schemas). We show how careful observation by practitioners can be used to understand and support future learning encounters through a schematic pedagogy, and we consider implications of such an approach for practice in toddlers’ early learning.
    • Science

      Pope, Deborah; University of Chester (Learning Matters, Sage, 2019-10-12)
      The chapter explores and deconstructs the nature of subject knowledge for teaching primary science from integrated theoretical and practice-based perspectives.
    • Science and the global dimension

      Weavers, Jane; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2008-09-01)
      This book chapter dicusses how the global dimension of science can be incorporated into key stage one and key stage two theough the use of activities.
    • Scouse Pop

      Skillen, Paul (Equinox (Sheffield), 2018-10-29)
      Scouse Pop is a journey into the personalities and music of the successful pioneering Liverpool pop bands of the late seventies and eighties. It examines their motivations, their uniqueness and the routes to success which made them into enduring musical innovators. It looks at the reasons why art-pop bands such as OMD, China Crisis, Echo and the Bunnymen, Black and Frankie Goes to Hollywood managed to combine art and commerce with such spectacular success. The bands experienced their own 'revolutions in the head, ' internal revolutions than eventually made many of them household names. The development of these suburban romantics from Liverpool represented a period of intensive creativity and musical romanticism that still resonates today. The spirit of (internal) revolution at the heart of these bands retains a strong fascination for those interested in artistic creation and popular culture. Given the bleak and uninspiring context within which the bands surfaced, how did these musicians achieve great success? Scouse Pop explores this question in detail, and examines the factors that facilitated the transformation of Liverpool teenage dreams into commercial and cultural impact. The music industry, radio and DJs, producers and engineers, the record-buying public and the bands themselves comprise the heart of this account.
    • Scouse Pop TV Series 1 and 2 Bay TV

      Skillen, Paul
      A series of TV interviews and live performances regarding creativity and difference in the music from Liverpool in the 1980s and 1990s.