• Beyond Text: The co-creation of dramatised character and iStory

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Kuusipalo-Maatta, P.; Oikarinen, T.; Benmergui, R.; University of Lapeenranta, University of Lapeenranta, University of Lapeenranta, University of Tampere (Emerald, 2017-12-04)
      In exploring the impact of reflective and work applied approaches we are curious how vivid new insights and collective ‘Eureka’ momentums occur. These momentums can be forces for work communities to gain competitive advantages. However, we know little of how learning is actively involved in the processing of creating new insights and how such a turning to learning –mode (Pässilä and Owens, 2016) can be facilitated. In the light of cultural studies and art education, we explore how the method of dramatising characters in a specific innovation culture can be facilitated. In this viewpoint we are suggesting one approach for this type of turning to learning which we call Beyond Text, outlining its theoretical underpinnings, its co-creative development & its application In this Beyond Text context we are introducing the method of dramatising characters (DC) and the method of iStory both of which are our own design based on the theory of the four existing categories of research-based theatre (RBT). The findings of this viewpoint article are that both iStory as well as DC methods are useful and practical learning facilitation processes and platforms that can be adopted for use in organizations for promoting reflexivity. Especially they can act as a bridge between various forms of knowing and consummate the other knowledge types (experiential, practical and propositional) in a way that advances practice-based innovation. The originality and value of iStory and DC is that they can be utilized as dialogical evaluation methods when traditional evaluation strategies and pre-determined indicators are unusable.
    • Beyond the Big Six

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2010-06-01)
      An exploration of the arguments surrounding the inclusion of minority religions in the teaching of RE
    • Beyond the Big Six Religions: Expanding the Boundaries in the Teaching of Religion and Worldviews

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2019-11-04)
      Beyond the Big Six is a timely addition to the body of work surrounding the teaching of Religious Education in schools. The book will build on research surrounding the desirability and possibility of expanding the breadth of religious and non-religious worldviews within the classroom. Although it will be recognized that there are challenges in the existing circumstances to the inclusion of ‘smaller’ religions this book will articulate the importance of such an inclusion in today’s society. It will also explore how such religions might be used within the RE classroom; one distinctive quality of this book is the focus it will have on classroom applicability. While it will draw on research, there will be chapters to help teachers adopt an approach to the teaching of the major world religions, and particular Key Stages
    • The Biopolitics of Art Education

      Penketh, Claire; Adams, Jeff; Edge Hill University; University of Chester
      Editorial introduction to special issue of the Journal Of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, by guest editors Penketh and Adams, for this issue on the topic of 'The Biopolitics of Art Education'. This issue of JLCDS offers a timely opportunity for an extended discussion of current practices at the intersection of art education and disability studies, a discussion that has the potential to further practice and theory in both domains.
    • Book Review: 'Art Disobedience and Ethics: The Adventure of Pedagogy'

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (National Society for Education in Art and Design, 2018-09-01)
      Book review of Dennis Atkinson's 'Art, disobedience and ethics: The adventure of pedagogy',
    • Bringing languages to life: a longitudinal study of the development of creative practice in student teachers of modern languages

      Hulse, Bethan; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-12-29)
      This article reports the findings of a longitudinal study exploring the process of learning to teach modern languages in the changing landscape of teacher education. It employs a postmodern critical ethnographic methodology to examine the experiences of a group of student teachers over the course of a one-year postgraduate teacher education programme in England. The focus is on how experiences in university and in school encourage or discourage the development of creativity. The schools inspectorate, Ofsted, is critical of lifeless teaching which fails to inspire young people to learn languages. However, the pressures of ‘performative’ requirements act as a discouragement to creativity. The data indicates that whilst student teachers express a desire to be more creative, they find it difficult to implement their ideas in school. A post-structuralist analysis of Marx’s theory of alienation is employed to argue that the early formation of professional identity is a process of acquiescence to oppressive external structures over which individuals have no control. The study concludes that it is possible to create spaces where the temporary suspension of alienation can allow individuals to put life back into language learning.
    • Celia

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      A sestina poem - one of 6 - published in Life Lines
    • Challenging Convention(s): Methodological Explorations in Contemporary Qualitative Inquiry

      Garratt, Dean; University of Chester (SAGE, 2015-03-01)
      Based on a recent inaugural lecture, this article presents a critical appreciation and analysis of the application of different research methodologies to selected social and educational research contexts. The analysis is set against the backdrop of an ontological question concerning the possibility of truth. Specifically, it seeks to explore the untenability of any notion of absolute truth in contemporary qualitative inquiry, and examine the corollary implications for determining the nature, role and status of research. It is argued that the ability to challenge convention offers both the possibility and productive capacity to unsettle dominant research methodologies, while also critiquing normative social and professional research practices. Utilising three contrasting methodological frameworks: Gadamerian hermeneutics; Foucauldian theory; and Lacanian psychoanalytic theory; the narrative follows a journey of personal development and shows how seemingly different and diverse theoretical perspectives can reveal critical new insights on contemporary social research issues and practices, cultures and communities.
    • Challenging the rules of engagement: Co-creation of knowledge in the public art museum

      Adams, Jeff; Riding, Deborah (University of Chester, 2017-07)
      This research examined perceptions of knowledge about art in the gallery and explored the potential of co-creation as a possible model with which to genuinely learn with our audience. Data for the study was generated at a gallery I have been based at throughout the period of undertaking the research. Participants were recruited from this gallery from groups implicated in knowledge co-creation: educators, curators, gallery assistants and audience members. Participants took part in a group workshop at the gallery facilitated by an artist educator, designed to provide opportunities to develop new knowledge together. Following the workshop, participants were interviewed and their experiences analysed. Other data generated through the workshop, as well as analysis of organisational documentation, and reflection on my own practice as a gallery educator, have been drawn together through a bricolage approach. Through analysis of data, I have constructed a situated taxonomy of knowledge types in the gallery and a conceptual model of co-creation. Key paradigms of knowledge have been identified, and the issues associated with the authoritative nature of institutional knowledge presented as a significant barrier to co-creation. Findings indicate that a fundamental shift in the epistemological stance of the gallery is required. A new not-knowing paradigm has been constructed to accommodate models of co-creation shown to be successful in generating a collaborative learning experience, which I have termed ‘learning-with’.The material being presented for examination is my own work and has not been submitted for an award of this or another HEI except in minor particulars which are explicitly noted in the body of the thesis. Where research pertaining to the thesis was undertaken collaboratively, the nature and extent of my individual contribution has been made explicit.
    • Child abuse, child protection, and defensive ‘touch’ in PE teaching and sports coaching

      Piper, Heather; Garratt, Dean; Taylor, Bill; Manchester Metropolitan University ; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitan University (Taylor & Francis, 2012-10-30)
      This article discusses recently completed research on ‘no touch’ sports coaching, by placing it in a broader social context which problematises the way child abuse and child protection (or safeguarding) are conceived and discussed in terms of policy and practice. It also provides a brief indicative summary of the research findings and offers a discussion of moral panic, risk society and worst case thinking, before drawing on Foucault's work on governmentality to offer an explanation of how the current situation arose.
    • Children and technology

      Blythe, Katrina; Bennett, Richard; Hamill, Andrew (Nash Pollock Publishing, 1996-06-01)
      This book offers suggestions and examples on how teachers can use technology for teaching at key stages 1 and 2.
    • Children's history of Chester

      Pickford, Anthony; University of Chester (Hometown World, 2010-06-01)
      This book investiages the people and events that have defined Chester.
    • Citizenship education and philosophical enquiry: Putting thinking back into practice

      Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; University of Chester ; Manchester Metropolitian University (SAGE, 2012-02-21)
      This article proposes a purposeful re-introduction of philosophical enquiry to the process and pedagogy of citizenship education.
    • Cognitive load theory and teacher expertise: Specific challenges for primary teachers

      Pope, Deborah; University of Chester
      The article deconstructs cognitive load theory and is associated knowledge demands of primary teachers. Knowledge structures of expert teachers are compared with those of novices. CLT is used as a lens through which to consider the demands of learning to teach in the primary phase. Recommendations are suggested for professional development activities that promote the building of schemata to promote a higher degree of automaticity around key pedagogical thinking and action.
    • Collaboration in Arts Education

      Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-10-27)
      The merits of collaborative learning through the arts are immediately obvious: many of the arts physically lend themselves to shared contributions and joint productions –theatre, dance, murals, singing, textiles, graphics, design and printing, to name only the first to spring to mind. Underpinning each of these are social and communal learning: how to be together, and share in an enterprise. This is turn feeds into the idea of a democratic society where the learner is not only acquiring knowledge and skills, but also an understanding of what it is to be a citizen; it is hard to overestimate how important being well socialised at an early age is to the coherence of a functioning civic society. Given the seemingly obvious advantages of such an education, and the equitable society that it is designed to support, it is troubling that collaborative education, and with it arts education, is increasingly neglected in favour of individual and competitive learning.
    • Collectively Creative: a means to perceive differently

      Owens, Allan; Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Hong Kong Federation, 2016-12-02)
      This feature article is a response to the question " Can anyone be creative?"In dialogue with the Editor of the Hong Kong Youth Journal Elaine Morgan the argument is made that it is possible given the right environment. The significance of the creative arts in the establishment of social justice in education is highlighted.
    • The complex tapestry of relationships which surround adoptive families: A case study.

      Hamilton, Paula; Forgacs-Pritchard, Kevin; University of Chester
      This small-scale study examines the experiences encountered by a group ofparentsintheirendeavourstosupporttheirchildrentosettleandthrive, both infamily lifeand school.The study identifies how a ‘complextapestry of relationships’ exists both within and beyond adoptive families, which influences children’s developmental and educational outcomes. Conflicting relationships emerged between: foster carers and adoptive parents, paired siblings, and adoptive parents and teachers. Enhanced understanding of the complexities and tensions which may exist will help school practitioners to identify approaches and strategies that can be used with children and families to promote adopted children’s self- identity, well-being and their capacity to function and learn inside classrooms.
    • Connections: Integrating ICT into geography

      Garner, Wendy P.; Pickford, Anthony; University College Chester (Geographical Association, 2005-10-01)
      This book offers activities in which geographical skills, knowledge and understanding are enhanced by the use of ICT. The activities are designed to develop children's ICT skills at Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2.
    • Crafting Collaborations of Art and School: Contextual Studies in Sweden

      Adams, Jeff; Owens, Allan; Cedervall, Sofia (University of Chester, 2020-03-15)
      This study explores relations, experiences and processes between art and school collaborations at policy, organisational and individual levels. This is done through a historical account of policy documents as well as a contemporary qualitative study. The study focuses on two professional theatres in Sweden with extensive experience working with schools. In that context, professions of actors, teachers and drama pedagogues participating in collaborative projects, their roles, craftsmanship and a community of practice (CoP) as well as their encounters as professionals have been investigated. The study results show that theatres collaborate with schools because of their ruling policy and aim of reaching all children. Schools collaborate due to policy requirements, own interest and improvement. Drama pedagogues are much involved in the whole creative process, and the profession seems to be heading for a higher status at theatres. The individuals collaborate because it supports the creative process and the aim of their craftsmanship and/or personal mission. For drama pedagogues and artists, collaboration becomes a tool in itself, but for teachers the arts become a tool. The teachers have a personal interest in and experience with the arts. Encounters with professional artists can encourage teachers to use or continue to use artistic skills in teaching. The actors are rooted in the craft of their art and values driven in their wish to have encounters with children and youth. The drama pedagogue’s roles as mediator and confidant are important for the success of a collaborative project but also risky due to information accommodated. All encounters in this study were strongly framed by a drama pedagogic CoP. Within the frame, rooms of artistry based on the actors’ CoP occur. These rooms indicate the creation of a regime of competence, a shared CoP where the professionals are able to encounter each other as equals and share a creative and social process of meaning making. The fictional part of the study indicates that the drama pedagogue can become a border guard as much as a bridge in collaboration, standing in the way of teachers and actors directly sharing and transmitting valuable knowledge. A dialogue on aims, practice and competence become crucial for the professionals in order to achieve cooperation and thus learning.
    • Creativity

      Poole, Simon E.; University of Chester
      An editorial for the Education journal Cornucopia on the theme of Creativity