• Global 'snap shot' of physical education in the primary school

      Tones, Steven; Jones, Luke; University of Chester (Association for Physical Education, 2010)
      This article provides a global overview of physical education in primary schools.
    • Global 'snap shot' of physical education in the primary school (part 2)

      Tones, Steven; Jones, Luke; University of Chester (Association for Physical Education, 2011)
      This article discusses physical education in primary schools throughout the world.
    • Reading to create: Literature in the primary school

      Pearson, Henry; Chester College of Higher Education (Chester College of Higher Education, 1985)
      This pamphlet discusses the quality of books available for reading in the primary school and how the best use can be made of them.
    • Teaching primary English

      Brien, Jackie; University of Chester (SAGE, 2012-02-22)
      This book discusses what teachers of literacy know and do; speaking and listening; reading for understanding; teaching phonics for reading and writing; learning and teaching writing; accuracy and presentation; inclusive learning and teaching of English, the use of ICT in teaching English; assessment; and English and literacy beyond the classroom.
    • The Neoliberal Educational “Imaginary” as experienced by a group of Primary School Headteachers

      Moran, Paul; Carr, Victoria L. C. (University of Chester, 2019-05-14)
      In this thesis I undertake a critical policy analysis in which I place education reform in the UK within the context of a changing social structure, transformed since the advent of neoliberalism in the 1970s, and examine the implications of reform on the role of primary school Headteachers. In particular, I situate my analysis within increased promotion of global economic competition and policy supported by neoliberal ideology in which the prevailing government seeks to retain legitimacy by claiming to institute reforms to improve education, whilst simultaneously reducing direct funding which is, in fact, destabilising it. Neoliberalism is a distinct political ideology that has flourished in the Western world over the last four decades and is based on theories of the free market; underpinned by economic efficiency, bureaucracy, rationality and measurable performativity. I look in detail at how the leadership of schools has changed, as a direct result of the implementation of new managerial instruments, and how resistance to these changes has been largely futile. Lacanian thinking would suggest that ideology which assumes education is a physical state that is inherently part of a democratic process, inextricably linked to politics, positively transformational and measurable, is in fact imaginary (Lacan, 2006). Our imaginary “order is embedded in the material word” and woven into the reality around us (Harari, 2012, p.127). It is within this ‘imaginary’ conceptualisation that my research is positioned. I present, and analyse, empirical data gathered from a number of primary school Headteachers from a range of contexts that outlines their lived experience as they attempt to navigate the, what could be described as, strongly surreal or ‘Kafkaesque’ (Löwy,1997) educational ‘imaginary’, as it is currently configured and, explore the efficacy of a forum that is used to support them as they therefore attempt the untenable. The significant issue of school context as an effect of how a school performs in testing regimes is substantial. It is clear that context greatly impacts on the extent to which Headteachers must shift their beliefs and practice to satisfy performative expectations. I conclude with an acknowledgement that to attempt to rationalise the educational ‘hyperreal’ without an appreciation of power and manipulation is impossible and, that the role of primary school Headteachers may only be plausible with the scaffold of forums such as the one examined within this research.