• Developing the next generation of leaders

      Lambert, Steve; University of Chester
      This chapter discusses the importance of developing future leaders from deep within an organization. The collective benefit is that those seeking promotion into leadership roles will be better prepared for the challenges they face. For those recruiting into leadership vacancies, they potentially have a greater pool of talented individuals to select from, reducing the risk of simply appointing the best person on the day rather than the best person for the job. The chapter suggests that sustainable leadership as a conceptual framework might support organizations in developing leaders and why given the neoliberal policy context that western education systems operate within, this is becoming increasing important. While having a framework is important, there are practical steps that organizations can take which will support individuals. However, it is important to recognize that these activities, such as work-shadowing and mentoring cannot be done in a vacuum. Staff need time and space to be able to put into practice their new skills. In addition, they need to understand the theoretical elements that underpin their newly acquired skills if they are to be used effectively. The chapter draws together a number of issues associated with the current policy context for needing to develop future leaders alongside the aforementioned conceptual framework that might support leaders to realize the potential they have within their staff.
    • The convergence of National Professional Qualifications in educational leadership and masters level study

      Lambert, Steve; University of Chester (Emerald, 2018-11-12)
      In February 2012, less than three years after the introduction of the compulsory National Professional Qualification for Headship (NPQH) for aspiring school head teachers, the mandatory requirement was removed. Despite no longer being a requirement, nearly 900 individuals annually, successfully complete the programme, with a further 5,000 completing the awards of National Professional Qualification for Middle Leadership (NPQML) and the National Professional Qualification for Senior Leadership (NQPSL). In 2017, the UK government decided that the suite of national professional qualifications (NPQML, NPQSL, NPQH) needed to be updated in order to ensure that they remained relevant to the changing shape of the educational landscape, particularly through the expansion of multi-academy trusts. At the same time, the government proposed a new National Professional Qualification for Executive Leadership (NPQEL) aimed at the chief executives of multi-academy trusts, which vary in size from two or three schools working together, to trusts with in excess of thirty-five schools. This paper explores the way in which the new NPQ programmes are having masters level criteria embedded into them to facilitate a seamless progression into masters level study and what potential benefits this brings to the individual and the provider of the NPQ programmes.