• Beyond Text: The co-creation of dramatised character and iStory

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Kuusipalo-Maatta, P.; Oikarinen, T.; Benmergui, R.; University of Lapeenranta, University of Lapeenranta, University of Lapeenranta, University of Tampere (Emerald, 2017-12-04)
      In exploring the impact of reflective and work applied approaches we are curious how vivid new insights and collective ‘Eureka’ momentums occur. These momentums can be forces for work communities to gain competitive advantages. However, we know little of how learning is actively involved in the processing of creating new insights and how such a turning to learning –mode (Pässilä and Owens, 2016) can be facilitated. In the light of cultural studies and art education, we explore how the method of dramatising characters in a specific innovation culture can be facilitated. In this viewpoint we are suggesting one approach for this type of turning to learning which we call Beyond Text, outlining its theoretical underpinnings, its co-creative development & its application In this Beyond Text context we are introducing the method of dramatising characters (DC) and the method of iStory both of which are our own design based on the theory of the four existing categories of research-based theatre (RBT). The findings of this viewpoint article are that both iStory as well as DC methods are useful and practical learning facilitation processes and platforms that can be adopted for use in organizations for promoting reflexivity. Especially they can act as a bridge between various forms of knowing and consummate the other knowledge types (experiential, practical and propositional) in a way that advances practice-based innovation. The originality and value of iStory and DC is that they can be utilized as dialogical evaluation methods when traditional evaluation strategies and pre-determined indicators are unusable.
    • Collectively Creative: a means to perceive differently

      Owens, Allan; Adams, Jeff; University of Chester (Hong Kong Federation, 2016-12-02)
      This feature article is a response to the question " Can anyone be creative?"In dialogue with the Editor of the Hong Kong Youth Journal Elaine Morgan the argument is made that it is possible given the right environment. The significance of the creative arts in the establishment of social justice in education is highlighted.
    • Creativity and Democracy in Education: Practices and politics of learning through the arts

      Adams, Jeff; Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-07-16)
      The struggle to establish more democratic education pedagogies has a long history in the politics of mainstream education. This book argues for the significance of the creative arts in the establishment of social justice in education, using examples drawn from a selection of contemporary case studies including Japanese applied drama, Palestinian teacher education and Room 13 children’s contemporary art. Jeff Adams and Allan Owens use their research in practice to explore creativity conceptually, historically and metaphorically within a variety of UK and international contexts, which are analysed using political and social theories of democratic and relational education. Each chapter discusses the relationship between models of democratic creativity and the cultural conditions in which they are practised, with a focus on new critical pedagogies that have developed in response to neoliberalism and marketization in education. The book is structured throughout by the theories, practices and the ideals that were once considered to be foundational for education: democratic citizenship and a just society.
    • Decisions

      Owens, Allan (Chester College, 1996)
      This article discusses decisions - a process drama created to explore the concept of ethical decision making - which ran in October 1996 as part of the Decade of Evangelism mission run by the Chester and Wakefield dioceses. The project focused on the sharing of faith (in particular Christian beliefs relating to forgiveness), taking real risks, and changing attitudes.
    • Drama and the global dimension

      Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Trenthan Books, 2008-09-01)
      This book chapter discusses drama activities that a primary school could use to inform pupils of the global dimension of drama.
    • Dramworks: Planning drama, creating practical structures, developing drama pretexts

      Owens, Allan; Barber, Keith; University College Chester ; Victoria Community High School, Crewe (Carel Press, 1996-04-01)
      This book focuses on planning drama, creating practical structures and developing drama pretexts. Methods of reflecting on and evaluating the work are built into the pretexts.
    • Echo of dreams

      Owens, Allan; Green, Naomi; University of Chester, NEC Katayanagi Institute (2015-04)
      The Echo of Dreams Pre-text allows for consideration of sudden changes in life, the unpredictable , unforeseen and unknowable to create a space for the exchange of such understandings and to allow for a celebration of the human spirit in the face of loss
    • Evocative Report: Frodsham Goods Shed Brokerage Process

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Chamberlain, O.; Lapeenranta University, Finland (2015-07-12)
      Frodsham Foundation together with the local town council had already conducted an online survey for use of the disused railways Goods Shed in the middle of the town ; a large number of responses provided strong evidence that the public wanted the building to be used, but the remoteness of this digital form of consultation had not engaged enough of the community to provide the momentum to take things forward in a way that would convince the larger county council who owned the building to hand it over on a long term lease to the Foundation and local town. We agreed on four-month period for the process and division of responsibilities. In the first month the foundation would identify and contact the focus groups they wanted us to work with; in the second the focus groups would be run; in the third the evocative report would be created and in the fourth the evocative report would be presented at an open public meeting in which the next concrete steps to be taken would be identified. Research Based Theatre as used in this case constituted a form of participatory, action and collaborative research. The data sources which formed the empirical evidence base, consisted primarily of narratives of involvement, and our reflexive narratives in response to this. The intention to research issues that surface within a community and then use the understandings that are generated from it for the benefit of those in that community has parallels with the function of applied drama and critical pedagogy. They are concerned with going beyond seeing the world as it is and creating spaces to think of it differently. A key question in this ‘connected’ approach to research is to ask how it is this possible and how are we to act in new and different ways (Schratz and Walker 1995, p.125). Nine focus group sessions took place over a one-week period, comprising a very wide range of participants: business and local entrepreneur groups, patient forums, community groups, school parent-teachers association members, community voluntary sector leaders, younger families and children, jobseekers and youngsters. The focus groups were run by our Anglo-Finnish team of four - two ABIs practitioners and two postgraduate students. Participants were aware from the outset that we were interested in not only the substantive topic of the focus group sessions, but also the ways in which we approach this, and were interested in what this allowed for. Each session began with an explanation of the research-based and arts nature of the brokerage process. The same aim informed each, which was to let as many voices as possible rub up against each other in the course of one and a half hours. The arts-based initiatives used in sessions varied according to context in order to realise this aim and the following three examples are presented to give a sense of the commonalities and differences in structure used across the nine focus groups. The Evocative Report makes transparent this process.
    • Exploring the material mediation of dialogic space – A qualitative analysis of professional learning in Initial teacher education based on reflective sketchbooks

      Moate, Josephine; Hulse, Bethan; Jahnke, Holger; Owens, Allan; Jyvaskyla University; University of Chester; Europa University, Flensburg (Elsevier, 2018-12-05)
      This study addresses the crucial relationship between theory and practice as a key feature of professional learning in initial teacher education. The context for the study is an EU-funded intensive programme drawing on different dimensions of insideness and outsideness and arts-based pedagogies in response to the diversity of education today. The data for the study comes from self-selected pages from preservice teacher participants’ reflective sketchbooks. As a methodological approach that unifies the sensuous and cognitive this study suggests that reflective sketchbooks document the dialogic encounters of students whilst also providing a material space that can itself become a form of dialogic space for critical reflection. The main findings of the study outline critical ways in which preservice teachers transform theoretical inputs into individual expressions as well as conceptualise theory in relation to lived experience.
    • Inner Elf- Living Fairytale of Lapland

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Pulisaari, P.; Lukkarila, A.; Lapeenranta University, Hullo Poro Oy Ltd (Hullo Poro Oy Ltd, 2016-02-09)
      Inner Elf- Living Fairytale of Lapland was co-created through an arts-based research process led by Anne Passila and Allan Owens 17th-22nd October. The process surfaced the insights and local knowledge and understandings of the team selected by the company Hullo Poro Oy Ltd including Pirre Pulisaari, Anne Lukkarila and this was used to thread through progress the initial frames introduced by Passila and Owens of the elf in a yellow dress and the concept of Inner (s)elf. The fairytale provided the landscape and narrative or a new experience part company is creating in Lapland. Visitors from all over the world will be introduced through it the culture of life up above the Arctic Circle.
    • Michael’s Story :Developing Understandings of Gypsy Traveller culture

      Owens, Allan; Pickford, Barbara; Pickford, Tony; University of Chester, University of Chester, University of Chester (Chester Academic Press., 2014-02-03)
      Practise based research in 8 schools over a three year period led to the creation of this CDROM and DVD Video. Process drama was used to develop knowledge and understanding of Gypsy Traveller Culture and Lifestyle.
    • Process Drama as a tool for teaching modern languages: supporting the development of creativity and innovation in early professional practice

      Hulse, Bethan; Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2017-02-10)
      This paper reflects on issues arising from a research-informed learning and teaching project intended to enable student teachers of Modern Languages (MLs) to experiment with the use of unscripted ‘process drama’ in their classroom practice. The idea that process drama could become part of the language teacher’s repertoire has been in circulation for some time (Kao and O’Neill, 1998; Bräuer, 2002; Fleming, 2006; Stinson and Freebody, 2006; Giebert, 2014) yet there is little evidence to suggest that its use has become widespread in schools in England. The aim of the project was to enable student teachers to acquire drama teaching techniques which they could incorporate into their own practice in order to enrich the learning experiences their students through creative and imaginative use of the foreign language in the classroom. The research was undertaken over a period of three years by two teacher educators on a secondary initial teacher education programme in a university in England. The paper concludes that it is both possible and desirable for student teachers to encounter alternative approaches which challenge the norm and that with support they may develop innovative practices which can survive the ‘the ‘crucible of classroom experience’ (Stronach et al. 2002, p.124).
    • Reaching from Behind: Sillamae

      Owens, Allan; University of Chester, Cumbria Local Education Authority (ETV National Estonian Television, 2014-11-18)
      ETV (Estonian Television National Channel) Interviewer and Arts Commentator Andrus Vaariku asks ‘Can Theatre Change the World?’ An Estonian National TV documentary focusing on three artists in three contexts: Contemporary Performance Practitioner Ene-Liis Semper, Applied Drama Practitioners Allan Owens & Katrin Nielsen ‘Hidden town: Silamae and Hendrik Toompere illusioonl Ugala Theatre Director UGALA.
    • Sharing something

      Owens, Allan (Chester College, 1995)
      This article discusses events leading up to and a performance of "After the ball is over" at Howard House, HM Prison Styal in Cheshire during July 1994.
    • Storyhouse Young Leaders: Evaluation Report

      Poole, Simon E.; Arya-Manesh, Emma; Owens, Allan; Adams, Jeff; University of Chester; Storyhouse; Oglesby Charitable Trust & Bank of America Merrill Lynch.
      An Evaluation Report of the Storyhouse Young Leaders Programme. Commissioned by Oglesby Charitable Trust & Bank of America Merrill Lynch written by RECAP.
    • Troubling Mistakes: Playing with Our Assumptions

      Owens, Allan; Korhonen, P.; Passila, A.; Theatre Academy of Finland-University of Arts Helsinki, Lapeenranta University (Draamatayo, 2017-02-14)
      The Art of making Mistakes asks if mistakes exist in the first place. All the 17 international writers are professionals in the fields of drama and improvisation : teachers, researchers and artists, who have solid experience in the arts and who all have something to say about mistakes and how they view mistakes and the beauty that lies within them. This book is divided into two parts . In the first part, the writers reflect upon the philosophy of failure. In the second part, the writers offer workshops in which it is possible to consider one’s own relationship with mistakes, for instance through improv and drama exercises.
    • Understandings of creative practice and pedagogy by teacher education communities in West Bank, Palestine, and North West England

      Adams, Jeff; Al-Yamani, Hala; Arya-Manesh, Emma; Mizel, Omar; Owens, Allan; Qurie, Dua’a; Unveristy of Chester; University of Bethlehem; University of Chester; University of Bethlehem; Unveristy of Chester; University of Bethlehem.
      This paper discusses a collaborative research project that aimed to explore approaches to creative practices and pedagogies by teacher education communities in the West Bank, Palestine, and North West England (Bethlehem and Chester). The project explored the values, attitudes and perceptions of teacher educators and student teachers in relation to creative pedagogies and the conditions under which they flourished in each community. We found that creativity was understood to take many forms, according to the cultural values and conditions present in each community, and that creative pedagogical forms emerged from the specificities of their cultural and political contexts. Creativity in education is a contentious issue in both cultures, but an area that both education communities wished to explore further. Despite the differences, there were surprising commonalities between the two communities about the value of creative practices and the relation of creativity to democratic and critical practices in the classroom.
    • Using Kaleidoscopic Pedagogy to Foster Critically Reflective Learning about Management and Leadership

      Owens, Allan; Passila, A.; Malin, Virpi; University of Chester, Lapeenranta University of Technology, Jyvaskyla University. (Palgrave macmillan, 2019-04-19)
      This chapter focuses on an Arts-Based Intervention (ABI) into an Introductory course of Management and Leadership offered to students considering key concepts and frames of thinking in the field for the first time. First, we introduce Kaleidoscopic Pedagogy and conceptually frame our ABI in relation to the mode of learning that it allows for together with the drive for equality that it is concerned with. We then introduce the context of the ABI, describe the course and its background and the course facilitators together with information about the participants. Emphasis is placed on the way the course was framed to bring a sense of present-day management reality through our use of art-based methods including an ongoing collaboration with an experienced R&D manager who is part of the course team. Next an explanation of the content of three of the Art-based Methods used in the course as part of the whole ABI. This is followed by a description of the process of learning providing a sense of what the experience of learning would be like for a participant. The impact and experiences of learning during the intervention are then discussed from the students’ and the tutors’ perspectives. The final two sections focus on impact and lessons learned.