• A Latter-Day Saint approach to addiction: Aetiology, consequences and treatment in a theological context

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (MDPI, 2014-12-24)
      This article explores the theological underpinning of the nature, aetiology and treatment of addictions within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The first section outlines the “plan of salvation” and how this provides the theological framework for the source and solution to addictions. The final section explores addiction against this background in terms of its aetiology, types, consequences and treatment in a Latter-day Saint context. In so doing it builds on the recognition by the Church in recent years that addiction is a problem in the lives of some of its members and that treatment programs coherent with its teachings and beliefs are necessary. The article concludes by suggesting that while addiction may be more openly discussed within a Latter-day Saint context there is a need to keep this dialogue moving forward. This article does not examine Latter-day Saint teaching within the wider context of psychotherapy and other definitions of addiction; rather it explores the place of addiction as understood within the theological and ecclesiological context of Mormonism.
    • A Latter-day Saint reading of Tolkien

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (2012-08-17)
      This paper explores the religious themes evident in some of Tolkien’s writings, most notably The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings. The author will utilise existing scholarship on Tolkien’s religious views and the imagery already explored in light of his Roman Catholicism. What will be distinct, however, is that the author will reflect on how they relate to, and can deepen their understanding of, Latter-day Saint beliefs. Tenuous links will not be made - the author will address issues as they seem justified. The paper will begin with an exploration of Tolkien’s motivations for writing, and also his religious beliefs. The two intertwine nicely, and provide a justification, if one is necessary, for the use of his work in a religious context. This does not suggest that The Lord of the Rings can be used devotionally, rather that it can point towards greater truth. The remainder of the paper will explore themes from Tolkien’s writings in the Latter-day Saint context explained earlier.
    • A Latter-day Saint reading of Tolkien

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Luna Press, 2016-06-09)
      This chapter explores the religious themes evident in some of Tolkien’s writings, most notably The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings. The author will utilise existing scholarship on Tolkien’s religious views and the imagery already explored in light of his Roman Catholicism. What will be distinct, however, is that the author will reflect on how they relate to, and can deepen their understanding of, Latter-day Saint beliefs. Tenuous links will not be made - the author will address issues as they seem justified. The paper will begin with an exploration of Tolkien’s motivations for writing, and also his religious beliefs. The two intertwine nicely, and provide a justification, if one is necessary, for the use of his work in a religious context. This does not suggest that The Lord of the Rings can be used devotionally, rather that it can point towards greater truth. The remainder of the paper will explore themes from Tolkien’s writings in the Latter-day Saint context explained earlier.
    • Alma and Abinadi: The Worth of Souls

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Greg Kofford, 2016-08-02)
      Our scripture study and reading often assume that the prophetic figures within the texts are in complete agreement with each other. Because of this we can fail to recognize that those authors and personalities frequently have different-and sometimes competing-views on some of the most important doctrines of the Gospel, including the nature of God, the roles of scripture and prophecy, and the Atonement. In this unique volume, fictionalized dialogues between the various voices of scripture illustrate how these differences and disagreements are not flaws of the texts but are rather essential features of the canon. These creative dialogues include Abraham and Job debating the utility of suffering and our submission to God, Alma and Abinidi disagreeing on the place of justice in the Atonement, and the authors Mark and Luke discussing the role of women in Jesus's ministry. It is by examining and embracing the different perspectives within the canon that readers are able to discover just how rich and invigorating the scriptures can be. The dialogues within this volume show how just as "iron sharpeneth iron," so can we sharpen our own thoughts and beliefs as we engage not just the various voices in the scriptures but also the various voices within our community (Proverbs 27:17).
    • Beyond the Big Six

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2010-06-01)
      An exploration of the arguments surrounding the inclusion of minority religions in the teaching of RE
    • Beyond the Big Six Religions: Expanding the Boundaries in the Teaching of Religion and Worldviews

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2019-11-04)
      Beyond the Big Six is a timely addition to the body of work surrounding the teaching of Religious Education in schools. The book will build on research surrounding the desirability and possibility of expanding the breadth of religious and non-religious worldviews within the classroom. Although it will be recognized that there are challenges in the existing circumstances to the inclusion of ‘smaller’ religions this book will articulate the importance of such an inclusion in today’s society. It will also explore how such religions might be used within the RE classroom; one distinctive quality of this book is the focus it will have on classroom applicability. While it will draw on research, there will be chapters to help teachers adopt an approach to the teaching of the major world religions, and particular Key Stages
    • Faith based practice? The impact of a teacher’s beliefs on the classroom

      Holt, James D.; University of Chesterr (Matthew James, 2013-06-06)
      Exploring the impact of a teacher's beliefs on their practice in the classroom
    • Inclusion

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-09-04)
      Inclusion in the Secondary RE Classroom
    • Interfaith Dialogue: A Way Forward in Setting Ground Rules

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (2012)
      This article examines briefly the various polemic and polite exchanges between Evangelicals and Latter-day Saints. It suggests that these exchanges are asking the wrong questions, and beginning from an incorrect basis. Within Latter-day Saint circles the questions has tended to be how: “How do other faiths relate to use?”, where actually, understanding how they view other faiths will enable Latter-day Saints to frame their questions and responses better. The article concludes with a suggestion for ground rules to enable the burgeoning dialogue to move forward at a pace.
    • Is Ender a Mormon?

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Open Court, 2013-09-17)
      A discussion of the place of religion in the Ender's Saga by Orson Scott Card
    • Mormon-Evangelical dialogue - Setting the ground rules: A way forward

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Sacred Tribes Press, 2012)
      This journal article discusses the various polemic and polite exchanges between Evagelicals and Latter-day Saints.It suggests that these exchanges are asking the wrong questions and beginning from an incorrect basis in relation to inter-faith relationships.
    • Religious Education

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Learning Matters, 2019-10-12)
      An exploration of pedagogical subject knowledge and the teaching of RE in the primary school
    • Religious education in the secondary school: An introduction to teaching, learning and the world religions

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-12-01)
      Religious Education in the Secondary School is a comprehensive, straightforward introduction to the effective teaching of Religious Education in the secondary classroom. Acknowledging the highly valuable yet often misunderstood contribution of RE, this text shows how the subject can be taught in a way that explores the impact of religion on the lives of people and society, engaging pupils and preparing them to become individuals who celebrate and respect diversity. It is illustrated throughout with ideas for teaching at different key stages and offers expert chapters introducing you to both the World Religions and the core aspects of effective teaching and learning. With an emphasis on developing an understanding of the importance - and different ways - of meeting the learning needs of all pupils, key chapters cover: -Understanding different pedagogies of RE -Spirituality and RE -Tips on effective planning and assessment -An approach to teaching across the Key Stages -Core subject knowledge in Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism Written by an experienced teacher, teacher educator and examiner, Religious Education in the Secondary School is a succinct compendium and has a real classroom applicability offering all trainee RE teachers, as well as those teaching Religious Education as specialists or non-specialists a wealth of support and inspiration.
    • Teaching and a Teacher’s Faith and Beliefs

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Springer, 2013-03)
      How does a teacher's beliefs affect their practise in the classroom?
    • The Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley

      The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Holt, James D. (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2016)
      A devotional work used as a compilation of the teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley
    • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Mohr Siebeck, 2016-11-01)
      An introduction to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and their place in Religious Education
    • The Holy Ghost in Latter-day Saint ritual experience

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (International Journal of Mormon Studies, 2012)
      Pneumatology is not a word that is used within Mormon writings, but Mormon theology does elucidate a work of the Holy Ghost that is evident in the world and in the Church that can be explored. In examining a Latter-day Saint pneumatology one is faced with a paucity of specific material; with the exception of a small number of books the Holy Ghost has not been the subject of a systematic analysis. While being critically linked with other areas, the role of the Spirit in individual and institutional practice is an area which needs exploring in much greater depth than has been done previously. The extent to which the Holy Ghost has been ignored is exemplified in the writings of Davies; he argues that in certain aspects Mormonism can be seen to be distinctly binitarian concluding: …that, in the starkest and most unqualified of terms, the Holy Ghost or Holy Spirit has been of primary historical significance within practical Mormon living but of secondary importance within its technical theology (2009: 38, see also Davies, 2010). This article will explore a small area of pneumatology and leave many areas that will need further exploration elsewhere, . It will seek to place the Holy Ghost as central in the theology of ritual ordinances. It will suggest that while Latter-day Saints believe that outward ordinances are not salvific in themselves they are channels of the Holy Ghost, which is the active medium of the grace of Christ to make sanctification and exaltation possible.
    • “‘There's only one God, ma'am’- one God or many gods in the world of the Avengers”

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Open Court, 2018-08-30)
      This chapter will explore the nature of God within Captain America’s world and how much this draws on the ‘previous life’ of Captain Steve Rogers. It will do so, however, utilizing the exploration of the experience of Moses and the identification of God at the burning bush as a way to understand a worldview that accepts the existence of multiple deities, but with one supreme deity: ‘I am’. The chapter will then contrast this understanding with a Humean approach to the understanding of religion and the nature of God.
    • What really matters about teacher education at Cathedrals Group Universities: volume 2 the case studies

      Holt, James D.; Bowie, Robert; Stone, Glenn; University of Chester; Canterbury Christ Church University; University of Chichester (2018)
      The NICER project, What really matters about teacher education at Cathedrals Group universities, sought to understand better how teacher education staff, partnership schools student teachers perceived their teacher education institutions and programmes including specific reference to the Institution’s Christian foundation. The data was collected between November 2016 and January 2018. The aims: To investigate why ITE trainees choose Christian foundation university teacher training programmes To investigate why schools choose Christian foundation universities as training programme partners To investigate what Christian foundation universities claim is particular to their Christian foundation, what is particularly or deeply Christian about their ITE provision To investigate what Christian foundation universities, ITE trainees and partnership schools claim about ITE trainees at the point of qualification, that is particular to the institutions’ Christian foundation. The National Institute of Christian Education Research at Canterbury Christ Church University led the research project. The project took place over two years with a pilot and qualitative phase and a quantitative phase.