• Reflections on the Impact of Coronavirus on Public Affairs

      Harris, Phil; Moss, Danny; University of Chester (Wiley, 2020-06-28)
      As the editorial team considered how we might best mark the 20th anniversary year of the publication of the Journal of Public Affairs and reflected on what significant developments have occurred in the world of public affairs over the past two decades, none of us around that table could have possibly imagined how the world of politics and society as a whole could and would change in just a few short months. Yes we all witnessed the horrible effects of Ebola in Africa, and of SARS in the Far East and in the UK we experienced the nationwide lockdown of countryside during the infamous foot and mouth disease that ravaged the countryside in 2001. However devastating each of these disease outbreaks that we might think of as contagions have been, none can really compare or have prepared us fully for a the rapidity and impact that the recent coronavirus pandemic has had across the world, not only in terms of the scale of the infection rising death rate, but in the profound impact it has had on the economy and on people's lives and livelihoods
    • The Sage Handbook of International Corporate and Public Affairs

      Harris, Phil; Fleisher, Craig; University of Chester and Aurora WDC (SAGE, 2017-02-01)
      The management and oversight of public affairs (PA) is a critical boardroom skill that resides with the Chief Executive and those engaged in multi-complex strategic political management work, particularly those working at and across the international business, government and politics interface. This has become of paramount importance to modern business in a very competitive and rapidly globalizing world where strong and focused leadership on corporate communication, issues management, governmental and regulatory issues and soft power (Nye, 2004) can often be pivotal to whether an organization fails or succeeds (Griffin, 2016, Sun and Harris, 2014, Fleisher, 2012; Titley, 2003). As one senior executive commented in a conversation with one of the authors, there are 1) those who are good at public affairs and politics and their businesses succeed, and 2) those who do not understand the subject and they are either no more or in decline.