• Freedom and transparency in turbulent times: Some thoughts and issues

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2017-08-21)
      Editorial of Volume 17, 3 of Journal of Public Affairs
    • Political Marketing, Business & Management Video Collection, Sage Publications

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Sage, 2016-08-01)
      Professor Phil Harris explains the place of marketing in the political process. He highlights how politicians use the media to hone their image, how marketing has changed since the 1950s
    • The Sage Handbook of International Corporate and Public Affairs

      Harris, Phil; Fleisher, Craig; University of Chester and Aurora WDC (SAGE, 2017-02-01)
      The management and oversight of public affairs (PA) is a critical boardroom skill that resides with the Chief Executive and those engaged in multi-complex strategic political management work, particularly those working at and across the international business, government and politics interface. This has become of paramount importance to modern business in a very competitive and rapidly globalizing world where strong and focused leadership on corporate communication, issues management, governmental and regulatory issues and soft power (Nye, 2004) can often be pivotal to whether an organization fails or succeeds (Griffin, 2016, Sun and Harris, 2014, Fleisher, 2012; Titley, 2003). As one senior executive commented in a conversation with one of the authors, there are 1) those who are good at public affairs and politics and their businesses succeed, and 2) those who do not understand the subject and they are either no more or in decline.
    • The War to End All Wars: Reflections on the First World War and Public Affairs

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-02-03)
      Editorial As I write this many of us are reflecting upon the outbreak and impact of the First World War on Europe and the World. It was declared during the Summer of 1914 in Europe, when much decision making was limited due to leaders being on holiday and was almost inevitable as some have argued, as the trains had been booked and troops were mobilised. Clearly political communications were not good and European Continental Entente fell apart under the pressures of ambition, greed, nationalism, a lack of trust and public affairs systems not being in place to build cooperation and stop mass destruction. As Margot Asquith the wife of the British Prime minister put it “War! War! – everyone at dinner discussing how long the war would last. The average opinion was 3 weeks to 3 months” (24th July 1914, Page 4 in Brock and Brock, 2014). Of course others, Kitchener, amongst them said it would be a year. It was not a short war but a long one, that lasted for over four years and sucked in every part of the world and destroyed a generation of youth and leaders, which Europe has taken almost a hundred years to fully recover from. Let us reflect, draw lessons and do all in our power to ensure it is never contemplated again and that political decision making and public affairs is never as in inadequate again The themes within this general issue of the JPA focus on climate change, corruption, environmental policy, lobbying, political marketing, public affairs, renewable energy and water policy. A range of critical areas of study and operation both for the modern researcher and practitioner in international public affairs. Countries covered include Belgium, Eire, Switzerland, UK, US and of course organisationally interesting in trade and regulation terms the WTO. Followed by various articles
    • To Exit or Not To Exit: That is the Question: To Build or Retreat: That is another Question

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2016-08-11)
      Editorial. It has been a very interesting and tragic period for Europe over the last month. The UK voted to leave the EU in its Referendum, Its Prime Minister resigned and Teresa May has taken over as the Second female Conservative Prime Minister and formed a new government. The UK Economy took an initial battering in world markets but seems to have settled down now as global players perceive there are advantages and disadvantages for the UK in being in the EU, but the main thing is stability in global markets. It will also speed-up reform of the EU and its institutions, so this may be advantageous. We have also seen a sharp increase in horrific terror atrocities in Europe, notably France, Belgium and Germany which has pointed to the need for more effective management of our freedoms and security of our citizens. It has been a difficult Summer for Europe. We hope and pray that stability and safety will return as without that society will not be based on a balanced platform to provide for all We are also seeing the emergence of the two contenders for the US Presidency, Donald Trump versus Hilary Clinton. The non-establishment business candidate versus the female long serving politician and social reformer. Cleveland and Philadelphia have all given us insights into what is coming. In addition we will soon have elections in Germany and France, which could see major change, whilst growth in South East Asia continues steadily which can be seen in the positive meeting in Ulan Bator at the 11th ASEM Summit. World regulation and development now seems to be very much to the fore as we build and develop a truly global international economy accountable governmental and financial system, accountability, good governance and transparency will be the core underpinnings of that development This is a general issue of the Journal of Public Affairs