• "Welsh obscurity to notoriety" - Lloyd George, the Boer War, and the North Wales Press

      Peters, Lisa; University of Chester (Oak Knoll Press & The British Library, 2008-05)
      This book chapter discusses the actions of David Lloyd George (MP for the Carnarvon Boroughs and future Prime Minister) during the Boer War of 1899-1902 as seen by the local North Wales press, The chapter seeks to cast light upon local views of Lloyd George's stance and explain why he was re-elected with an increased majority in the 1900 general election, despite accusations of treason. Newspapers analysed include the Carnarvon & Denbigh Herald, the North Wales Times, Yr Herald Cymraeg, the North Wales Chronicle, the Wrexham Advertiser, the North Wales Guardian, the Holyhead Mail and Anglesey Herald, and Y Baner ac Amserau Cymru.
    • Welsh periodicals in the nineteenth century

      Peters, Lisa; University of Chester (2014-05-27)
      This presentation places the developing Welsh periodical press within the changing economic, political, and social nature of nineteenth century Wales.
    • What’s in a name? Family violence involving older adults

      Benbow, Susan M.; Bhattacharyya, Sharmi; Kingston, Paul (Emerald, 2018-12-10)
    • When Speaking English Is Not Enough: The Consequences of Language-Based Stigma for Nonnative Speakers

      Birney, Megan E.; orcid: 0000-0002-6786-6322; Rabinovich, Anna; Morton, Thomas A.; Heath, Hannah; Ashcroft, Sam (SAGE Publications, 2019-11-06)
      We explored the effects of language-based stigma on the relationship between native and nonnative speakers. In two studies, we found that stigmatized nonnative speakers experienced more negative interpersonal interactions, higher levels of intergroup threat, and reduced performance on an English test compared with nonnative speakers who did not experience stigma. These effects were mediated by anxiety and moderated by prevention-related goals. Furthermore, native speakers perceived stigmatized (vs. not-stigmatized) speakers’ accents as stronger and their commitment to living in the host country as weaker. Our findings suggest that experiencing language-based stigma can (a) incite a stereotype threat response from nonnative speakers, and (b) damage their relationship with native speakers on an interpersonal and intergroup level.