• A leftward bias for the arrangement of consumer items that differ in attractiveness

      Rodway, Paul; orcid: 0000-0002-7667-6782; Schepman, Astrid; orcid: 0000-0002-7407-362X (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-24)
    • A leftward bias for the arrangement of consumer items that differ in attractiveness

      Rodway, Paul; orcid: 0000-0002-7667-6782; Schepman, Astrid; orcid: 0000-0002-7407-362X (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-24)
    • A leftward bias for the arrangement of consumer items that differ in attractiveness.

      Rodway, Paul; orcid: 0000-0002-7667-6782; Schepman, Astrid; orcid: 0000-0002-7407-362X (2020-06-24)
      People are frequently biased to use left-side information more than right-side information to inform their perceptual judgements. This research examined whether the leftward bias also applied to preferences for the arrangement of everyday consumer items. Pairs of consumer items were created where one item was more attractive than the other item. Using a two-alternative forced choice task, Experiment 1 found a robust preference for arrangements with the more attractive consumer item on the left side rather than the right side of a pair. Experiment 2 reversed the judgement decision, with participants asked to choose the arrangement they least preferred, and a bias for arrangements with the more attractive item on the right side emerged. Experiment 3 failed to find an effect of the "attractive left" preference on participants' purchasing intentions. The preference for attractive left arrangements has implications for the display of consumer products and for the aesthetic arrangement of objects in general. The findings are discussed in relation to hemispheric asymmetries in processing and the role of left to right scanning.
    • ‘A spectacle for the cameras’: the survival of a Lakeland leisure tradition, 1930- c.1955

      Andrew, Rebecca; orcid: 0000-0002-6803-7948 (Informa UK Limited, 2020-04-27)
    • A systematic review of the organizational, environmental, professional and child and family factors influencing the timing of admission to hospital for children with serious infectious illness

      editor: Ho, Jacqueline J.; Carter, Bernie; orcid: 0000-0001-5226-9878; email: bernie.carter@edgehill.ac.uk; Roland, Damian; orcid: 0000-0001-9334-5144; Bray, Lucy; Harris, Jane; orcid: 0000-0001-6584-1642; Pandey, Poornima; Fox, Jo; Carrol, Enitan D.; Neill, Sarah; orcid: 0000-0001-9699-078X (Public Library of Science, 2020-07-23)
      Background: Infection, particularly in the first 5 years of life, is a major cause of childhood deaths globally, many deaths from infections such as pneumonia and meningococcal disease are avoidable, if treated in time. Some factors that contribute to morbidity and mortality can be modified. These include organisational and environmental factors as well as those related to the child, family or professional. Objective: Examine what organizational and environmental factors and individual child, family and professional factors affect timing of admission to hospital for children with a serious infectious illness. Design: Systematic review. Data sources: Key search terms were identified and used to search CINAHL Plus, Medline, ASSIA, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute Database of Systematic Review. Study appraisal methods: Primary research (e.g. quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies) and literature reviews (e.g., systematic, scoping and narrative) were included if participants included or were restricted to children under 5 years of age with serious infectious illnesses, included parents and/or first contact health care professionals in primary care, urgent and emergency care and where the research had been conducted in OECD high income countries. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to review the methodological quality of the studies. Main findings: Thirty-six papers were selected for full text review; 12 studies fitted the inclusion criteria. Factors influencing the timing of admission to hospital included the variability in children’s illness trajectories and pathways to hospital, parental recognition of symptoms and clinicians non-recognition of illness severity, parental help-seeking behaviour and clinician responses, access to services, use and non-use of ‘gut feeling’ by clinicians, and sub-optimal management within primary, secondary and tertiary services. Conclusions: The pathways taken by children with a serious infectious illness to hospital are complex and influenced by a variety of potentially modifiable individual, organisational, environmental and contextual factors. Supportive, accessible, respectful services that provide continuity, clear communication, advice and safety-netting are important as is improved training for clinicians and a mandate to attend to ‘gut feeling’. Implications: Relatively simple interventions such as improved communication have the potential to improve the quality of care and reduce morbidity and mortality in children with a serious infectious illness.
    • A systematic review of the organizational, environmental, professional and child and family factors influencing the timing of admission to hospital for children with serious infectious illness.

      Carter, Bernie; orcid: 0000-0001-5226-9878; Roland, Damian; orcid: 0000-0001-9334-5144; Bray, Lucy; Harris, Jane; orcid: 0000-0001-6584-1642; Pandey, Poornima; Fox, Jo; Carrol, Enitan D; Neill, Sarah; orcid: 0000-0001-9699-078X (2020-07-23)
      Infection, particularly in the first 5 years of life, is a major cause of childhood deaths globally, many deaths from infections such as pneumonia and meningococcal disease are avoidable, if treated in time. Some factors that contribute to morbidity and mortality can be modified. These include organisational and environmental factors as well as those related to the child, family or professional. Examine what organizational and environmental factors and individual child, family and professional factors affect timing of admission to hospital for children with a serious infectious illness. Systematic review. Key search terms were identified and used to search CINAHL Plus, Medline, ASSIA, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute Database of Systematic Review. Primary research (e.g. quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies) and literature reviews (e.g., systematic, scoping and narrative) were included if participants included or were restricted to children under 5 years of age with serious infectious illnesses, included parents and/or first contact health care professionals in primary care, urgent and emergency care and where the research had been conducted in OECD high income countries. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to review the methodological quality of the studies. Thirty-six papers were selected for full text review; 12 studies fitted the inclusion criteria. Factors influencing the timing of admission to hospital included the variability in children's illness trajectories and pathways to hospital, parental recognition of symptoms and clinicians non-recognition of illness severity, parental help-seeking behaviour and clinician responses, access to services, use and non-use of 'gut feeling' by clinicians, and sub-optimal management within primary, secondary and tertiary services. The pathways taken by children with a serious infectious illness to hospital are complex and influenced by a variety of potentially modifiable individual, organisational, environmental and contextual factors. Supportive, accessible, respectful services that provide continuity, clear communication, advice and safety-netting are important as is improved training for clinicians and a mandate to attend to 'gut feeling'. Relatively simple interventions such as improved communication have the potential to improve the quality of care and reduce morbidity and mortality in children with a serious infectious illness.
    • A validated food frequency questionnaire to determine dietary intake of vitamin D.

      Watkins, Stephanie; Freeborn, Ellen; Mushtaq, Sohail (2020-11-06)
      The aim of the present study was to develop and validate a vitamin D food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for assessment of dietary vitamin D intake in healthy adults in England, UK. The current study assessed the agreement between a four-day food diary (4d-FD) and a new vitamin D FFQ to measure dietary intake of vitamin D. Dietary intake was estimated using Nutritics dietary analysis software and Spearman's and Bland-Altman tests were utilised to assess correlation and agreement, respectively. Participants also provided a blood sample for plasma analysis of vitamin D concentrations. Home setting. Fifty participants were recruited to the study from the University of Chester and vicinity. Results showed a strong correlation between vitamin D intake recorded by the FFQ and the 4d-FD (r = 0.609; P < 0.0001) within 95% limits of agreement. Furthermore, a significant correlation between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations and vitamin D intake measured by the FFQ (r = 0.290, P = 0.041) and the 4d-FD (r = 0.360, P = 0.01) was observed. Our analysis suggests this FFQ is a useful and rapid tool for researchers and health professionals to assess vitamin D dietary intakes in healthy adults in the UK.
    • Acquiring and marketing eBooks at University College Chester - it's all down to teamwork and communication

      Stockton, Christine; University College Chester (SCONUL, 2004)
      This article discusses the events leading up to the launch of the eBooks collection at University College Chester.
    • Active Aging: Social Entrepreneuring in Local Communities of Five European Countries

      Socci, Marco; orcid: 0000-0001-9093-2167; email: m.socci@inrca.it; Clarke, David; email: clarke.d@chester.ac.uk; Principi, Andrea; orcid: 0000-0003-3701-0539; email: a.principi@inrca.it (MDPI, 2020-04-03)
      Building on the active aging framework, the aim of this study, carried out between 2016 and 2018, is to analyze concrete experiences of older individuals acting as key players of social change in six local communities of five European countries (Bulgaria, Denmark, England, France, Spain). The 19 seniors involved in the study, according to social contexts, individual past experiences, knowledge, and motivations, acted as senior social entrepreneurs, trying to build a pathway towards social solutions for unmet social problems they detected in local communities. Data were collected via templates and questionnaires and analyzed using the thematic analysis. The results highlighted that the 16 local initiatives created by seniors concerned social problems such as food waste, social isolation, multicultural integration, etc. The social solutions implemented by seniors seemed to have the potential to produce social value and, to different degrees, encouraging results and impact. Since this “social experiment” provided evidence that senior social entrepreneuring could be a driver to solve societal problems, policy makers should sustain the spread of both social entrepreneurial mindset and practices at the European level, for catalyzing the active potential of older people for the benefit of European local communities.
    • Adherence and a Potential Trade-Off Currently Faced in Optimizing Hemophilia Treatment

      Burke, Tom; Asghar, Sohaib; Misciattelli, Natalia; Kar, Sharmila; Morgan, George; Dhillon, Harpal; O'Hara, Jamie (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
      INTRODUCTION Severe hemophilia, i.e., &amp;lt;1% normal FVIII level (A) or FIX level (B), are congenital bleeding disorders characterized by uncontrolled bleeding. The clinical benefits of prophylactic FVIII/IX replacement therapy are well understood, but require adherence to a schedule of routine infusions. Optimal adherence is associated with better joint outcomes and lower rates of chronic pain. Nonetheless a lack of patient-reported data has to date limited our understanding of the patient burden associated with adherence to treatment, and the relationship between adherence and the ability to work, among people living with hemophilia in the US. Data from the Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study reported a high proportion of adults with hemophilia B receiving routine infusions (at least one infusion per month), showing a negative impact on their ability to work, and people receiving routine infusions were more likely than people treated on-demand to report an inability to work in most situations. The ability of people living with hemophilia to participate in the labor force, without barriers to job choice or working hours, is a key outcome in the drive to achieve health equity. The objective of the analysis is to examine the relationship between adherence and the labor force participation of people with severe hemophilia in the US. METHODS This analysis draws data from a patient-reported study, the 'Cost of Severe Hemophilia Across the US: A Socioeconomic Survey' (CHESS US+). Conducted in 2019, the CHESS US+ study is a cross-sectional patient-centered study of adults with severe hemophilia in the US. A patient-completed questionnaire collected data on clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes, for a 12-month retrospective period. This analysis examines labor force participation and employment status (full-time, part-time, unemployed, retired) and chronic pain categorized by 'none', low-level ('1-5'), and high-level ('6-10'). The analysis was stratified by adherence to treatment, self-reported on a 1-10 scale, from "not at all" to "fully", categorized into low (1-6), moderate (7-9) and full (10) adherence. Results are presented as mean (standard deviation) or N (%). RESULTS The analysis comprised 356 people with severe hemophilia A (73%) and B (27%) who participated in CHESS US+ study. In Table 1, the baseline characteristics of the study population are stratified by full adherence (N = 119), moderate adherence (N=134) and low adherence (N=103). Having no chronic pain was most prevalent in the full adherence group (37.7%), compared to moderate (8.3%) or low (13.9%) adherence cohorts. Chronic pain, both low- and high-levels were least prevalent among people with full adherence. Moreover, people with low adherence were disproportionately more likely to have high-levels of chronic pain relative to moderate adherence or full adherence (Table 1). Unemployment, however, was highest in full adherence (21.1%), and people with full adherence were also least likely to be in full-time employment (42%). The full-time employment rate decreased as adherence declined from full to moderate (Table 1), and was comparable in people with low adherence (57.3%) or moderate adherence (54.5%). CONCLUSIONS This analysis of CHESS US+ examined the complex relationship between labor market outcomes and adherence to treatment, among adults with severe hemophilia in the US. Adherence was associated with lower rates of chronic pain, representing the importance of achieving an optimal treatment strategy. Nonetheless, patients achieving optimal adherence were less likely to be in full-time employment, and more likely to be part-time or unemployed, comparatively. Together, these data characterize a trade-off in clinical outcomes versus workforce participation, and suggest that the goal of achieving health equity may currently still be unmet. Disclosures Burke: HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Asghar:HCD Economics: Current Employment. Misciattelli:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Kar:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Morgan:uniQure: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Current Employment. Dhillon:HCD Economics: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Other: All authors received editorial support for this abstract, furnished by Scott Battle, funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland. . O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy.
    • All aboard the ARCS

      Kasraie, Jason; Lewis, Sheena; Sanders, David (Informa UK Limited, 2020-04-02)
    • An Exploration into the Impact of Social Networking Site (SNS) Use on Body Image and Eating Behavior of Physically Active Men

      Flannery, Orla; orcid: 0000-0002-4348-2156; Harris, Kerrie; Kenny, Ursula Anne (SAGE Publications, 2020-04-02)
      The rapid proliferation of social networking sites (SNSs) has transformed the way people now socialize and communicate. SNSs have been recognized to contribute to body image (BI) dissatisfaction and disordered eating behavior (EB). Few qualitative studies have explored this issue in men. The aim of the current study was to investigate male SNS use and possible impacts on BI and EB. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight men in the United Kingdom. Interviews aimed to examine men’s views on the potential impact of SNSs on BI and EB. Data were thematically analyzed. Findings suggested that SNSs may be a useful nutrition idea tool and motivational platform for men to improve their diet and exercise uptake. However, results also indicated that SNS use may contribute to BI dissatisfaction and increased risk of disorder. Future research may identify risk factors of SNS use, male BI concerns, and eating pathology across the lifespan.
    • An overview of thermal necrosis: present and future

      Mediouni, Mohamed; Kucklick, Theodore; Poncet, Sébastien; Madiouni, Riadh; Abouaomar, Amine; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali; Chopko, Bohdan; Vaughan, Neil; Arora, Manit; et al. (Informa UK Limited, 2019-05-10)
    • An overview of thermal necrosis: present and future

      Mediouni, Mohamed; Kucklick, Theodore; Poncet, Sébastien; Madiouni, Riadh; Abouaomar, Amine; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali; Chopko, Bohdan; Vaughan, Neil; Arora, Manit; et al. (Informa UK Limited, 2019-05-10)
    • Aneurysm Growth After Endovascular Sealing of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (EVAS) with the Nellix Endoprosthesis.

      Yafawi, Asma; email: asma@yafawi.com; McWilliams, Richard G; Fisher, Robert K; England, Andrew; Karouki, Maria; Uhanowita Marage, Ruwanka; Torella, Francesco (2020-08-14)
      The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of post endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth, and its association with stent migration, in a cohort of patients with differing compliance to old and new Instructions For Use (IFU). A retrospective single centre study was conducted to review the computed tomography (CT) and clinical data of elective, infrarenal EVAS cases, performed as a primary intervention, between December 2013 and March 2018. All included patients had a baseline post-operative CT scan at one month and at least one year follow up. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of AAA growth and its association with stent migration. AAA growth was defined as a ≥5% increase in aortic volume between the lowermost renal artery and the aortic bifurcation post EVAS at any time during follow up, in comparison to the baseline CT scan. Migration was defined according to the ESVS guidelines, as > 10 mm downward movement of either Nellix stent frame in the proximal zone. Seventy-six patients were eligible for inclusion in the study (mean age 76 ± 7.4 years; 58 men). AAA growth was identified in 50 of 76 patients (66%); adherence to IFU did not affect its incidence (mean growth within IFU-2016 compliant cohort vs. non-compliant: 16% vs. 13%, p = .33). Over time, the incidence of AAA growth increased, from 32% at one year to 100% at four years. AAA growth by volume was progressive (p < .001), as its extent increased over time. Migration was detected in 16 patients and there was a statistically significant association with AAA growth (13 patients displayed migration and AAA growth, p = .036). Patients treated with EVAS are prone to AAA growth, irrespective of whether their aortic anatomy is IFU compliant. AAA growth by volume is associated with stent migration. Clinicians should continue close surveillance post EVAS, regardless of whether patients are treated within IFU. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.]
    • Archaeologies of rules and regulation: between text and practice

      Williams, Howard; orcid: 0000-0003-3510-6852 (Informa UK Limited, 2020-04-30)
    • Are advance care plans of any value?

      Willis, Derek; orcid: 0000-0003-2286-2827; email: derekw@severnhospice.org.uk; George, Rob (2020-08-21)
    • Aspartame in conjunction with carbohydrate reduces insulin levels during endurance exercise

      Siegler, Jason; Howell, Keith; Vince, Rebecca; Bray, James W.; Towlson, Chris; Peart, Daniel; Mellor, Duane; Atkin, Stephen; University of Western Sydney ; University of York ; University of Hull ; University of Hull ; University of Hull ; University of Hull ; University of Chester ; University of York (01/08/2012)
      As most sport drinks contain some form of non-nutritive sweetener (e.g. aspartame), and with the variation in blood glucose regulation and insulin secretion reportedly associated with aspartame, a further understanding of the effects on insulin and blood glucose regulation during exercise is warranted. Therefore, the aim of this preliminary study was to profile the insulin and blood glucose responses in healthy individuals after aspartame and carbohydrate ingestion during rest and exercise. Each participant completed four trials under the same conditions (45 min rest + 60 min self-paced intense exercise) differing only in their fluid intake: 1) carbohydrate (2% maltodextrin and 5% sucrose (C)); 2) 0.04% aspartame with 2% maltodextrin and 5% sucrose (CA)); 3) water (W); and 4) aspartame (0.04% aspartame with 2% maltodextrin (A)). Insulin levels dropped significantly for CA versus C alone (43%) between pre-exercise and 30 min, while W and A insulin levels did not differ between these time points. Aspartame with carbohydrate significantly lowered insulin levels during exercise versus carbohydrate alone.