• ‘A Certain Romance’: Style shifting in the language of Alex Turner in Arctic Monkeys songs 2006–2018

      Flanagan, Paul J (SAGE Publications, 2019-03-15)
      This paper reports on a diachronic study of the language employed by Arctic Monkeys frontman Alex Turner in his songs over a 13-year period. The analysis adapts Simpson’s (1999) USA-5 model for studying accent in vocal performance, and focuses on the realisation of three phonological variables and two dialect variables in a 16,000-word corpus of 69 songs across all six albums released by the band. Hailing from High Green, Sheffield, Turner speaks with a vernacular Yorkshire accent, and the band’s early appeal (particularly in northern England) is often accredited partially to their authentic down-to-earth image, content and performance. Throughout their career, the band have evolved in terms of their musical genre and style, and, having recorded their first two albums in England, later albums were recorded and produced mostly in Los Angeles. Simpson’s model is modified in order to analyse trends in usage of five linguistic variables with non-standard variants iconic of northern British identity, with a view to analysing how Turner’s changing linguistic practice relates to his affiliation with vernacular and institutional norms, and thus his performance of different identities within songs.
    • A comparison of self-reported and device measured sedentary behaviour in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

      Prince, Stephanie A.; orcid: 0000-0001-6729-5649; email: stephanie.princeware@canada.ca; Cardilli, Luca; Reed, Jennifer L.; Saunders, Travis J.; Kite, Chris; Douillette, Kevin; Fournier, Karine; Buckley, John P. (BioMed Central, 2020-03-04)
      Abstract: Background: Sedentary behaviour (SB) is a risk factor for chronic disease and premature mortality. While many individual studies have examined the reliability and validity of various self-report measures for assessing SB, it is not clear, in general, how self-reported SB (e.g., questionnaires, logs, ecological momentary assessments (EMAs)) compares to device measures (e.g., accelerometers, inclinometers). Objective: The primary objective of this systematic review was to compare self-report versus device measures of SB in adults. Methods: Six bibliographic databases were searched to identify all studies which included a comparable self-report and device measure of SB in adults. Risk of bias within and across studies was assessed. Results were synthesized using meta-analyses. Results: The review included 185 unique studies. A total of 123 studies comprising 173 comparisons and data from 55,199 participants were used to examine general criterion validity. The average mean difference was -105.19 minutes/day (95% CI: -127.21, -83.17); self-report underestimated sedentary time by ~1.74 hours/day compared to device measures. Self-reported time spent sedentary at work was ~40 minutes higher than when assessed by devices. Single item measures performed more poorly than multi-item questionnaires, EMAs and logs/diaries. On average, when compared to inclinometers, multi-item questionnaires, EMAs and logs/diaries were not significantly different, but had substantial amount of variability (up to 6 hours/day within individual studies) with approximately half over-reporting and half under-reporting. A total of 54 studies provided an assessment of reliability of a self-report measure, on average the reliability was good (ICC = 0.66). Conclusions: Evidence from this review suggests that single-item self-report measures generally underestimate sedentary time when compared to device measures. For accuracy, multi-item questionnaires, EMAs and logs/diaries with a shorter recall period should be encouraged above single item questions and longer recall periods if sedentary time is a primary outcome of study. Users should also be aware of the high degree of variability between and within tools. Studies should exert caution when comparing associations between different self-report and device measures with health outcomes. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42019118755
    • A quest for relaxation? A figurational analysis of the transformation of yoga into a global leisure time phenomenon

      Thurston, Miranda; orcid: 0000-0001-7779-3836; Bloyce, Daniel; orcid: 0000-0003-4114-3588 (Informa UK Limited, 2020-08-31)
    • Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)-enhanced communication skills: development and evaluation of a novel training programme

      Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J; orcid: 0000-0001-9041-5485; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; orcid: 0000-0001-5892-6488; Patterson, Pandora; orcid: 0000-0002-1686-3252; Suleman, Sahil; Howells, Lesley (BMJ Publishing Group, 2021-03-24)
      Background: Psychological suffering is ubiquitous with cancer and frequently presents as an unmet supportive care need. In clinical practice, distress-related needs are often addressed by nurses and non-psychologist allied healthcare professionals who may have limited training in psychological therapeutic frameworks, particularly more recently developed interventions such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Aims: We developed a single-day training programme for professionals working in supportive and palliative cancer care settings to change the nature of clinical communication about psychological distress and suffering towards an ACT-consistent approach. Method: We report on experiences of training delivery, and evaluation data about training satisfaction and intention to apply the training to clinical practice, from three training iterations in British and Australian, government-funded and charitable sectors. One hundred and sixteen cancer care professionals participated in the training. Evaluation data were collected from 53 participants (at either 2-week or 3-month follow-ups, or both) using self-report survey, including both quantitative and free-text questions. Results: At 2 week follow-up, 73% of trainees rating our course as having relevance to their work, and at 3 month follow-up, 46% agreed that they were better placed to provide improved clinical services. Qualitative feedback supported the inclusion of experiential learning and theoretical explanations underpinning ACT techniques. Undertaking this training did not significantly increase trainees’ stress levels, nor did implementation of this new way of working negatively affect staff well-being. Positive, ACT-consistent, changes in communication behaviours and attitudes were reported, however there was a lack of significant change in psychological flexibility. Discussion: Acceptability and applicability of this training to supportive and palliative healthcare is positive. The lack of change in psychological flexibility suggests a potential need for more experiential content in the training programme. Logistical challenges in one training group suggests the need for more robust train-the-trainer models moving forward.
    • Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)-enhanced communication skills: development and evaluation of a novel training programme.

      Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J; orcid: 0000-0001-9041-5485; email: n.hulbertwilliams@chester.ac.uk; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; orcid: 0000-0001-5892-6488; Patterson, Pandora; orcid: 0000-0002-1686-3252; Suleman, Sahil; Howells, Lesley (2021-03-24)
      Psychological suffering is ubiquitous with cancer and frequently presents as an unmet supportive care need. In clinical practice, distress-related needs are often addressed by nurses and non-psychologist allied healthcare professionals who may have limited training in psychological therapeutic frameworks, particularly more recently developed interventions such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). We developed a single-day training programme for professionals working in supportive and palliative cancer care settings to change the nature of clinical communication about psychological distress and suffering towards an ACT-consistent approach. We report on experiences of training delivery, and evaluation data about training satisfaction and intention to apply the training to clinical practice, from three training iterations in British and Australian, government-funded and charitable sectors. One hundred and sixteen cancer care professionals participated in the training. Evaluation data were collected from 53 participants (at either 2-week or 3-month follow-ups, or both) using self-report survey, including both quantitative and free-text questions. At 2 week follow-up, 73% of trainees rating our course as having relevance to their work, and at 3 month follow-up, 46% agreed that they were better placed to provide improved clinical services. Qualitative feedback supported the inclusion of experiential learning and theoretical explanations underpinning ACT techniques. Undertaking this training did not significantly increase trainees' stress levels, nor did implementation of this new way of working negatively affect staff well-being. Positive, ACT-consistent, changes in communication behaviours and attitudes were reported, however there was a lack of significant change in psychological flexibility. Acceptability and applicability of this training to supportive and palliative healthcare is positive. The lack of change in psychological flexibility suggests a potential need for more experiential content in the training programme. Logistical challenges in one training group suggests the need for more robust train-the-trainer models moving forward. [Abstract copyright: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.]
    • Acquiring and marketing eBooks at University College Chester - it's all down to teamwork and communication

      Stockton, Christine; University College Chester (SCONUL, 2004)
      This article discusses the events leading up to the launch of the eBooks collection at University College Chester.
    • Active Aging: Social Entrepreneuring in Local Communities of Five European Countries

      Socci, Marco; orcid: 0000-0001-9093-2167; email: m.socci@inrca.it; Clarke, David; email: clarke.d@chester.ac.uk; Principi, Andrea; orcid: 0000-0003-3701-0539; email: a.principi@inrca.it (MDPI, 2020-04-03)
      Building on the active aging framework, the aim of this study, carried out between 2016 and 2018, is to analyze concrete experiences of older individuals acting as key players of social change in six local communities of five European countries (Bulgaria, Denmark, England, France, Spain). The 19 seniors involved in the study, according to social contexts, individual past experiences, knowledge, and motivations, acted as senior social entrepreneurs, trying to build a pathway towards social solutions for unmet social problems they detected in local communities. Data were collected via templates and questionnaires and analyzed using the thematic analysis. The results highlighted that the 16 local initiatives created by seniors concerned social problems such as food waste, social isolation, multicultural integration, etc. The social solutions implemented by seniors seemed to have the potential to produce social value and, to different degrees, encouraging results and impact. Since this “social experiment” provided evidence that senior social entrepreneuring could be a driver to solve societal problems, policy makers should sustain the spread of both social entrepreneurial mindset and practices at the European level, for catalyzing the active potential of older people for the benefit of European local communities.
    • Adherence and a Potential Trade-Off Currently Faced in Optimizing Hemophilia Treatment

      Burke, Tom; Asghar, Sohaib; Misciattelli, Natalia; Kar, Sharmila; Morgan, George; Dhillon, Harpal; O'Hara, Jamie (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
      INTRODUCTION Severe hemophilia, i.e., <1% normal FVIII level (A) or FIX level (B), are congenital bleeding disorders characterized by uncontrolled bleeding. The clinical benefits of prophylactic FVIII/IX replacement therapy are well understood, but require adherence to a schedule of routine infusions. Optimal adherence is associated with better joint outcomes and lower rates of chronic pain. Nonetheless a lack of patient-reported data has to date limited our understanding of the patient burden associated with adherence to treatment, and the relationship between adherence and the ability to work, among people living with hemophilia in the US. Data from the Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study reported a high proportion of adults with hemophilia B receiving routine infusions (at least one infusion per month), showing a negative impact on their ability to work, and people receiving routine infusions were more likely than people treated on-demand to report an inability to work in most situations. The ability of people living with hemophilia to participate in the labor force, without barriers to job choice or working hours, is a key outcome in the drive to achieve health equity. The objective of the analysis is to examine the relationship between adherence and the labor force participation of people with severe hemophilia in the US. METHODS This analysis draws data from a patient-reported study, the 'Cost of Severe Hemophilia Across the US: A Socioeconomic Survey' (CHESS US+). Conducted in 2019, the CHESS US+ study is a cross-sectional patient-centered study of adults with severe hemophilia in the US. A patient-completed questionnaire collected data on clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes, for a 12-month retrospective period. This analysis examines labor force participation and employment status (full-time, part-time, unemployed, retired) and chronic pain categorized by 'none', low-level ('1-5'), and high-level ('6-10'). The analysis was stratified by adherence to treatment, self-reported on a 1-10 scale, from "not at all" to "fully", categorized into low (1-6), moderate (7-9) and full (10) adherence. Results are presented as mean (standard deviation) or N (%). RESULTS The analysis comprised 356 people with severe hemophilia A (73%) and B (27%) who participated in CHESS US+ study. In Table 1, the baseline characteristics of the study population are stratified by full adherence (N = 119), moderate adherence (N=134) and low adherence (N=103). Having no chronic pain was most prevalent in the full adherence group (37.7%), compared to moderate (8.3%) or low (13.9%) adherence cohorts. Chronic pain, both low- and high-levels were least prevalent among people with full adherence. Moreover, people with low adherence were disproportionately more likely to have high-levels of chronic pain relative to moderate adherence or full adherence (Table 1). Unemployment, however, was highest in full adherence (21.1%), and people with full adherence were also least likely to be in full-time employment (42%). The full-time employment rate decreased as adherence declined from full to moderate (Table 1), and was comparable in people with low adherence (57.3%) or moderate adherence (54.5%). CONCLUSIONS This analysis of CHESS US+ examined the complex relationship between labor market outcomes and adherence to treatment, among adults with severe hemophilia in the US. Adherence was associated with lower rates of chronic pain, representing the importance of achieving an optimal treatment strategy. Nonetheless, patients achieving optimal adherence were less likely to be in full-time employment, and more likely to be part-time or unemployed, comparatively. Together, these data characterize a trade-off in clinical outcomes versus workforce participation, and suggest that the goal of achieving health equity may currently still be unmet. Disclosures Burke: HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Asghar:HCD Economics: Current Employment. Misciattelli:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Kar:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Morgan:uniQure: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Current Employment. Dhillon:HCD Economics: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Other: All authors received editorial support for this abstract, furnished by Scott Battle, funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland. . O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy.
    • Adherence to Pre-operative Exercise and the Response to Prehabilitation in Oesophageal Cancer Patients

      Halliday, Laura J.; email: laura.halliday15@imperial.ac.uk; Doganay, Emre; Wynter-Blyth, Venetia; Osborn, Hayley; Buckley, John; Moorthy, Krishna (Springer US, 2020-04-20)
      Abstract: Background: Prehabilitation is thought to reduce post-operative respiratory complications by optimising fitness before surgery. This prospective, single-centre study aimed to establish the effect of pre-operative exercise on cardiorespiratory fitness in oesophageal cancer patients and characterise the effect of adherence and weekly physical activity on response to prehabilitation. Methods: Patients received a personalised, home-based pre-operative exercise programme and self-reported their adherence each week. Cardiorespiratory fitness (pVO2max and O2 pulse) was assessed at diagnosis, following completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and immediately before surgery. Study outcomes included changes in fitness and post-operative pneumonia. Results: Sixty-seven patients with oesophageal cancer underwent prehabilitation followed by surgery between January 2016 and December 2018. Fitness was preserved during NAC and then increased prior to surgery (pV02max Δ = +2.6 ml min−1, 95% CI 1.2–4.0 p = 0.001; O2 pulse Δ = +1.4 ml beat−1 95% CI 0.5–2.3 p = 0.001). Patients with higher baseline fitness completed more physical activity. Regression analyses found adherence was associated with improvement in fitness immediately before surgery (p = 0.048), and the amount of physical activity completed was associated with the risk of post-operative pneumonia (p = 0.035). Conclusion: Pre-operative exercise can maintain cardiorespiratory fitness during NAC and facilitate an increase in fitness before surgery. Greater exercise volumes were associated with a lower risk of post-operative pneumonia, highlighting the importance progressing exercise programmes throughout prehabilitation. Patients with high baseline fitness completed more physical activity and may require less supervision to reach their exercise goals. Further research is needed to explore stratified approaches to prehabilitation.
    • Adult lifetime cost of hemophilia B management in the US: payer and societal perspectives from a decision analytic model

      Li, Nanxin; Sawyer, Eileen K.; Maruszczyk, Konrad; orcid: 0000-0002-0173-5020; Guzauskas, Greg; orcid: 0000-0002-9095-1672; Slomka, Marta T.; Burke, Tom; Martin, Antony P.; orcid: 0000-0003-4383-6038; O’Hara, Jamie; orcid: 0000-0001-8262-034X; Stevenson, Matt; orcid: 0000-0002-3099-9877; Recht, Michael; orcid: 0000-0002-2805-1016 (Informa UK Limited, 2021-03-02)
    • Adult lifetime cost of hemophilia B management in the US: Payer and societal perspectives from a decision analytic model

      Li, Nanxin; Sawyer, Eileen K.; Maruszczyk, Konrad; orcid: 0000-0002-0173-5020; Guzauskas, Greg; orcid: 0000-0002-9095-1672; Slomka, Marta T.; Burke, Tom; Martin, Antony P.; O’Hara, Jamie; Stevenson, Matt; Recht, Michael (Informa UK Limited, 2021-02-16)
    • Adult lifetime cost of hemophilia B management in the US: Payer and societal perspectives from a decision analytic model.

      Li, Nanxin; Sawyer, Eileen K; Maruszczyk, Konrad; orcid: 0000-0002-0173-5020; Guzauskas, Greg; orcid: 0000-0002-9095-1672; Slomka, Marta T; Burke, Tom; Martin, Antony P; O'Hara, Jamie; Stevenson, Matt; Recht, Michael (2021-02-16)
      Hemophilia B (HB) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by bleeding-related complications which are managed by prophylactic or post-bleeding event ("on-demand") replacement of clotting factor IX (FIX). The standard of care for severe HB is life-long prophylaxis with standard half-life (SHL) or extended half-life (EHL) products given every 2-3 or 7-14 days, respectively. FIX treatment costs in the US have been investigated, but the lifetime costs of HB treatment have not been well characterized, particularly related to the impact of joint health deterioration and associated health resource utilization. We developed a decision-analytic model to explore outcomes, costs and underlying cost drivers associated with FIX treatment options over the lifetime of an adult with severe or moderately severe HB. With participation from clinicians, health technology assessment specialists and patient advocates, a Markov model was constructed to estimate bleeding events and costs associated with health states including 'bleed into joint', 'bleed not into joint', 'no bleed' and death. Sub-models of joint health were based on 0, 1, or ≥2 areas of chronic joint damage. US third-party payer and societal perspectives were considered with a lifetime horizon; sensitivity analyses tested the robustness of primary findings. Total adult lifetime costs per patient with severe and moderately severe HB were $21,086,607 for SHL FIX prophylaxis, $22,987,483 for EHL FIX prophylaxis, and $20,971,826 for on-demand FIX treatment. For FIX prophylaxis, the cost of FIX treatment account for >90% of the total HB treatment costs. This decision analytic model demonstrated significant economic burden associated with the current HB treatment paradigm.
    • Advances in Biofabrication for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications

      Domingos, Marco; email: marco.domingos@manchester.ac.uk; Moxon, Sam; email: samuel.moxon@manchester.ac.uk (MDPI, 2021-05-09)
      Biofabrication strategies continue to gain considerable interest in the efforts to develop methods for better replicating in vitro models of human tissues [...]
    • Ageing simulation in health and social care education: A mixed methods systematic review

      Eost‐Telling, Charlotte; orcid: 0000-0002-9568-3195; Kingston, Paul; Taylor, Louise; Emmerson, Louise (Wiley, 2020-10-06)
    • Ageing simulation in health and social care education: A mixed methods systematic review

      Eost‐Telling, Charlotte; orcid: 0000-0002-9568-3195; Kingston, Paul; Taylor, Louise; Emmerson, Louise (Wiley, 2020-10-06)
    • Agenda setting with children using the ‘three wishes’ technique

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O’Reilly, Michelle; Lester, Jessica Nina (SAGE Publications, 2018-03-15)
      The National Health Service (UK) offers initial screening appointments for children referred to child and adolescent mental health services to determine clinical need and assess risk. Conversation analysis was utilized on 28 video recordings of these assessments, lasting approximately 90 minutes each with a multidisciplinary team. This article focuses on the agenda setting strategies used to establish relevant goals with children and adolescents; specifically, the technique of offering ‘three wishes’. For example, ‘ if you had three wishes, what would you like to make happen?’ In cases where children initially volunteered an assessment-relevant wish, they tended not to articulate further wishes. Non-assessment-relevant wishes (i.e. fantasy wishes, such as being ‘rich’) were treated as insufficient, with many approaches used to realign establishing assessment relevant goals. Where responses were not institutionally relevant, practitioners undertook considerable discursive work to realign the focus of the three wishes task to assessment relevance. In these cases, the wish responses were treated as irrelevant and tended to be dismissed, rather than explored for further detail. Such work with the children’s contributions has implications for engaging children and child-centred practices.
    • An Exploration into the Impact of Social Networking Site (SNS) Use on Body Image and Eating Behavior of Physically Active Men

      Flannery, Orla; orcid: 0000-0002-4348-2156; Harris, Kerrie; Kenny, Ursula Anne (SAGE Publications, 2020-04-02)
      The rapid proliferation of social networking sites (SNSs) has transformed the way people now socialize and communicate. SNSs have been recognized to contribute to body image (BI) dissatisfaction and disordered eating behavior (EB). Few qualitative studies have explored this issue in men. The aim of the current study was to investigate male SNS use and possible impacts on BI and EB. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight men in the United Kingdom. Interviews aimed to examine men’s views on the potential impact of SNSs on BI and EB. Data were thematically analyzed. Findings suggested that SNSs may be a useful nutrition idea tool and motivational platform for men to improve their diet and exercise uptake. However, results also indicated that SNS use may contribute to BI dissatisfaction and increased risk of disorder. Future research may identify risk factors of SNS use, male BI concerns, and eating pathology across the lifespan.
    • An Exploration into the Impact of Social Networking Site (SNS) Use on Body Image and Eating Behavior of Physically Active Men

      Flannery, Orla; orcid: 0000-0002-4348-2156; email: o.flannery@mmu.ac.uk; Harris, Kerrie; Kenny, Ursula Anne (SAGE Publications, 2020-04-02)
      The rapid proliferation of social networking sites (SNSs) has transformed the way people now socialize and communicate. SNSs have been recognized to contribute to body image (BI) dissatisfaction and disordered eating behavior (EB). Few qualitative studies have explored this issue in men. The aim of the current study was to investigate male SNS use and possible impacts on BI and EB. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight men in the United Kingdom. Interviews aimed to examine men’s views on the potential impact of SNSs on BI and EB. Data were thematically analyzed. Findings suggested that SNSs may be a useful nutrition idea tool and motivational platform for men to improve their diet and exercise uptake. However, results also indicated that SNS use may contribute to BI dissatisfaction and increased risk of disorder. Future research may identify risk factors of SNS use, male BI concerns, and eating pathology across the lifespan.