• COVID-19 compassion in self-isolating old age: looking forward from family to regional and global concerns

      Douglas, Ian; orcid: 0000-0002-2451-8133; email: ian.douglas@manchester.ac.uk (Springer Singapore, 2020-06-26)
      Abstract: Self-isolating with my wife, I feel gratitude and compassion for all those supporting us, particularly those who regularly deliver our food and our immediate family members who check on us frequently. My compassion goes out to those on the “frontline”, particularly my niece and her daughter who are both nurses in a major hospital and who developed and recovered from COVID-19 symptoms. More broadly, I recognise that there are many communities that have had to cope with both geophysical and socio-politically created disasters while facing the COVID-19 pandemic, among then some young women bee-keepers in Uganda. In the UK context, I have great concern that severe funding cuts for regional and local public health services and disaster planning handicapped the country’s response to coronavirus and may have been a factor in the UK’s high coronavirus death rate. I see both positive and negative changes in air pollution and urban nature in our towns and cities, but also am concerned that we collectively may lose sight of the greater crises of climate change and species extinction. We have to work for a better future by taking forward the opportunities and lessons from our reactions to the pandemic. This leads to compassion for the yet unborn, our grandchildren’s children, who might enter a less habitable, more unequal less collaborative world than the imperfect one we now enjoy.
    • Secret Hunger: The Case of Anorexia Nervosa

      Giordano, Simona; orcid: 0000-0002-3608-0263; email: Simona.giordano@manchester.ac.uk (Springer Netherlands, 2020-09-28)
      Abstract: Anorexia nervosa is currently classed as a mental disorder. It is considered as a puzzling condition, scarcely understood and recalcitrant to treatment. This paper reviews the main hypotheses relating to the aetiology of anorexia nervosa. In particular, it focuses on family and sociological studies of anorexia. By reflecting on the hypotheses provided within these domains, and on the questions that these studies leave unanswered, this paper suggests that anorexic behaviour is understandable and rational, if seen in light of ordinary moral values.
    • Secret Hunger: The Case of Anorexia Nervosa

      Giordano, Simona; orcid: 0000-0002-3608-0263; email: Simona.giordano@manchester.ac.uk (Springer Netherlands, 2020-09-28)
      Abstract: Anorexia nervosa is currently classed as a mental disorder. It is considered as a puzzling condition, scarcely understood and recalcitrant to treatment. This paper reviews the main hypotheses relating to the aetiology of anorexia nervosa. In particular, it focuses on family and sociological studies of anorexia. By reflecting on the hypotheses provided within these domains, and on the questions that these studies leave unanswered, this paper suggests that anorexic behaviour is understandable and rational, if seen in light of ordinary moral values.