• Adherence and a Potential Trade-Off Currently Faced in Optimizing Hemophilia Treatment

      Burke, Tom; Asghar, Sohaib; Misciattelli, Natalia; Kar, Sharmila; Morgan, George; Dhillon, Harpal; O'Hara, Jamie (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
      INTRODUCTION Severe hemophilia, i.e., <1% normal FVIII level (A) or FIX level (B), are congenital bleeding disorders characterized by uncontrolled bleeding. The clinical benefits of prophylactic FVIII/IX replacement therapy are well understood, but require adherence to a schedule of routine infusions. Optimal adherence is associated with better joint outcomes and lower rates of chronic pain. Nonetheless a lack of patient-reported data has to date limited our understanding of the patient burden associated with adherence to treatment, and the relationship between adherence and the ability to work, among people living with hemophilia in the US. Data from the Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study reported a high proportion of adults with hemophilia B receiving routine infusions (at least one infusion per month), showing a negative impact on their ability to work, and people receiving routine infusions were more likely than people treated on-demand to report an inability to work in most situations. The ability of people living with hemophilia to participate in the labor force, without barriers to job choice or working hours, is a key outcome in the drive to achieve health equity. The objective of the analysis is to examine the relationship between adherence and the labor force participation of people with severe hemophilia in the US. METHODS This analysis draws data from a patient-reported study, the 'Cost of Severe Hemophilia Across the US: A Socioeconomic Survey' (CHESS US+). Conducted in 2019, the CHESS US+ study is a cross-sectional patient-centered study of adults with severe hemophilia in the US. A patient-completed questionnaire collected data on clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes, for a 12-month retrospective period. This analysis examines labor force participation and employment status (full-time, part-time, unemployed, retired) and chronic pain categorized by 'none', low-level ('1-5'), and high-level ('6-10'). The analysis was stratified by adherence to treatment, self-reported on a 1-10 scale, from "not at all" to "fully", categorized into low (1-6), moderate (7-9) and full (10) adherence. Results are presented as mean (standard deviation) or N (%). RESULTS The analysis comprised 356 people with severe hemophilia A (73%) and B (27%) who participated in CHESS US+ study. In Table 1, the baseline characteristics of the study population are stratified by full adherence (N = 119), moderate adherence (N=134) and low adherence (N=103). Having no chronic pain was most prevalent in the full adherence group (37.7%), compared to moderate (8.3%) or low (13.9%) adherence cohorts. Chronic pain, both low- and high-levels were least prevalent among people with full adherence. Moreover, people with low adherence were disproportionately more likely to have high-levels of chronic pain relative to moderate adherence or full adherence (Table 1). Unemployment, however, was highest in full adherence (21.1%), and people with full adherence were also least likely to be in full-time employment (42%). The full-time employment rate decreased as adherence declined from full to moderate (Table 1), and was comparable in people with low adherence (57.3%) or moderate adherence (54.5%). CONCLUSIONS This analysis of CHESS US+ examined the complex relationship between labor market outcomes and adherence to treatment, among adults with severe hemophilia in the US. Adherence was associated with lower rates of chronic pain, representing the importance of achieving an optimal treatment strategy. Nonetheless, patients achieving optimal adherence were less likely to be in full-time employment, and more likely to be part-time or unemployed, comparatively. Together, these data characterize a trade-off in clinical outcomes versus workforce participation, and suggest that the goal of achieving health equity may currently still be unmet. Disclosures Burke: HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Asghar:HCD Economics: Current Employment. Misciattelli:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Kar:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Morgan:uniQure: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Current Employment. Dhillon:HCD Economics: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Other: All authors received editorial support for this abstract, furnished by Scott Battle, funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland. . O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy.
    • Bleeding Data across Baseline FIX Expression Levels in People with Hemophilia B: An Analysis Using the 'Factor Expression Study'

      Burke, Tom; Shaikh, Anum; Ali, Talaha; Li, Nanxin; Konkle, Barbara A; Noone, Declan; O'Mahony, Brian; Pipe, Steven W; O'Hara, Jamie (American Society of Hematology, 2021-11-05)
      Abstract Introduction Complications such as spontaneous and trauma-related bleeding events typically experienced by people with hemophilia B (PWHB) are associated with long-term joint damage and chronic pain, and burdensome treatment with intravenous factor IX administration. Gene therapy, designed to enable the endogenous production of the missing clotting factor, has potential for curative benefit in PWHB (Dolan et al, 2018). Due to its link to risk for bleeding episodes, factor expression level (FEL) is commonly used as an endpoint in hemophilia gene therapy trials. However, little data currently exist linking FEL to bleeding risk in PWHB, most notably within the mild range. As such, the aim of this analysis was to examine the relationship between annual bleed rate (ABR) data across baseline FEL in PWHB. Methods Data from adult non-inhibitor PWHB, across Europe and the United States (US) who received clotting factor on-demand (OD), were drawn from the 'Cost of HaEmophilia in adults: a Socioeconomic Survey' (CHESS) studies. The CHESS studies are retrospective, burden-of-illness studies in people with hemophilia A or B, capturing the economic and humanistic burden associated with living with hemophilia. Additional data were collected to supplement the existing CHESS studies, particularly in people with exogenous FEL in the mild and moderate range. ABR was defined as the physician-reported number of bleed events experienced by the patient in the 12 months to study capture. A generalized linear model (GLM) was used to analyze variation in ABR data across FEL, adjusting for covariates age, body mass index (BMI), and blood-borne viruses. Following this, a multivariable restricted cubic spline (RCS) GLM regression was performed to create, model, and test for the potential non-linear relationship between FEL and ABR. The RCS regression employed 3 knots, located at baseline FEL values of 1, 5, and 10, and controlled once again for age, BMI, and blood-borne viruses. Results A total of 407 adult non-inhibitor PWHB, receiving an OD therapy regimen and with information on ABR, were profiled. The GLM provided adequate fit for the modeling of bleed data; the average marginal effect at the mean was computed from the GLM regression outputs. After controlling for the effects of all other model covariates, the regression analysis showed a significant association between FEL and ABR; for every 1% increase in FEL, the average ABR decreased by 0.08 units (p<0.001). The results of the RCS regression found a significant non-linear relationship between FEL and ABR, ceteris paribus (p<0.001). Conclusions The results of this analysis found baseline FEL to be significantly associated with ABR in PWHB; as baseline FEL increased, ABR reduced. This highlights the clinical importance of new hemophilia gene therapies potentially increasing FEL to that of the mild or non-hemophilic range in terms of reducing patient burden through the better prevention of bleeding events in PWHB. Disclosures Ali: UniQure: Current Employment. Li: UniQure: Current Employment. Konkle: Pfizer, Sangamo, Sanofi, Sigilon, Spark, Takeda and Uniqure: Research Funding; BioMarin, Pfizer and Sigilon: Consultancy. O'Mahony: BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc.: Consultancy; Freeline: Consultancy; Uniqure: Speakers Bureau. Pipe: Apcintex: Consultancy; ASC Therapeutics: Consultancy; Bayer: Consultancy; Biomarin: Consultancy, Other: Clinical trial investigator; Catalyst Biosciences: Consultancy; CSL Behring: Consultancy; HEMA Biologics: Consultancy; Freeline: Consultancy, Other: Clinical trial investigator; Novo Nordisk: Consultancy; Pfizer: Consultancy; Roche/Genentech: Consultancy, Other; Sangamo Therapeutics: Consultancy; Sanofi: Consultancy, Other; Takeda: Consultancy; Spark Therapeutics: Consultancy; uniQure: Consultancy, Other; Regeneron/ Intellia: Consultancy; Genventiv: Consultancy; Grifols: Consultancy; Octapharma: Consultancy; Shire: Consultancy.
    • Effect of Moderate and Severe Hemophilia a on Daily Life in Children and Their Caregivers: A CHESS Paediatrics Study Analysis

      Khair, Kate; Nissen, Francis; Silkey, Mariabeth; Burke, Tom; Shang, Aijing; Aizenas, Martynas; Meier, Oliver; O'Hara, Jamie; Noone, Declan (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
      Introduction: Hemophilia A (HA) is a congenital bleeding disorder, caused by a deficiency in clotting factor VIII (FVIII) and characterized by uncontrolled bleeding and progressive joint damage. This analysis assesses the impact of disease burden on the daily life of children with hemophilia A (CwHA) and their caregivers, addressing a deficit of current research on this topic. Methods: The Cost of Haemophilia in Europe: a Socioeconomic Survey in a Paediatric Population (CHESS Paediatrics) is a retrospective, burden-of-illness study in children with moderate and severe HA (defined by endogenous FVIII [IU/dL] relative to normal; moderate, 1-5%; severe, <1%) across France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. CwHA were recruited and stratified by both age group (0-5 years:6-11 years:12-17 years=1:1:1) and disease severity (severe:moderate=approximately 2:1, prioritizing children with severe HA [CwSHA]). Data for this analysis were captured from physicians, children, and their caregivers. Physicians completed online case report forms for treated children, and the child and/or their caregivers completed a paper-based questionnaire utilizing 5-point Likert scales. For CwHA aged 0-7, the questionnaire was completed by the caregiver, while for CwHA aged 8-17, children and caregivers completed different sections. Hours of care provided by the caregiver and work lost by the caregiver were reported as median values due to non-normal data distribution. Informed consent was obtained for all participants. Upon review, the study was approved by the University of Chester ethical committee. Results: Data from child/caregiver questionnaires were available for 196 CwHA (moderate, 25.5%; severe, 74.5%); the majority of these children, as expected, were receiving prophylaxis (72.4%), and did not have FVIII inhibitors (89.8%; Table 1). There was a direct impact of disease burden on CwHA, particularly with regard to physical and social activities (Figure 1). Overall, it was agreed or strongly agreed by the child or caregiver that 48.0% and 57.5% of children with moderate HA (CwMHA) and CwSHA respectively, have reduced physical activity due to HA, and 46.0% and 57.5%, respectively, have reduced social activity due to HA. A total of 36.0% and 61.0% of CwMHA and CwSHA, respectively, had adapted their treatment in anticipation of physical or social activity (Table 1). Furthermore, 34.0% of CwMHA and 55.4% of CwSHA were frustrated due to their disease, and many (CwMHA, 36.0%; CwSHA, 50.7%) felt that they had missed opportunities (Figure 1). For 66.0% of CwMHA and 76.0% of CwSHA, it was reported that their daily life was compromised due to their HA. Caregivers provided a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 19.0 (10.0-59.5) and 12.0 (5.0-20.0) hours a week of care for the hemophilia-related needs of their CwMHA (n=30) or CwSHA (n=105), respectively. Of those who responded, 17.4% (n=4/23) and 25.0% (n=20/80) of caregivers to CwMHA or CwSHA, respectively, stated they have lost work due to their caregiving duty. This was more than twice as common for caregivers in families with multiple CwHA (42.9%, n=9/21 responses) compared with those in families with one CwHA (18.5%, n=15/81 responses). Median (IQR) hours of work per week estimated to be lost were 20.0 (17.0-22.0) for caregivers of CwMHA (n=4) and 12.5 (4.50-20.0) for caregivers of CwSHA (n=20). Conclusions: In conclusion, both children and caregivers make sacrifices in their daily lives due to HA; many CwHA reported reduced physical and social activities, fewer opportunities and feelings of frustration due to their HA. Caregivers reported spending a significant number of hours caring for their child and some reported losing work due to their caring responsibilities. However, some outcomes may be limited by the small number of respondents and narrow response options, particularly those regarding the caregiver burden. Responses on the hours of work lost may be subject to selection bias, as caregivers who have lost work may be more likely to respond to this question. Additionally, as this question is targeted at caregivers in employment, it is unknown if some caregivers have left employment due to their caregiving responsibilities. According to this analysis, children/caregivers are frequently required to adapt the child's treatment before the child engages in activities. Overall, the burden of disease was similar in children with moderate and severe HA. Disclosures Khair: Takeda: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Bayer: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Biomarin: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Consultancy; Novo Nordisk: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Medikhair: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sobi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; CSL Behring: Honoraria, Research Funding; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Honoraria, Research Funding; Haemnet: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Nissen:GSK: Research Funding; Novartis: Research Funding; Actelion: Consultancy; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment. Silkey:Aerotek AG: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Burke:HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Shang:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Other: All authors received support for third party writing assistance, furnished by Scott Battle, PhD, provided by F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland.. Aizenas:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Meier:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Noone:Research Investigator PROBE: Research Funding; Healthcare Decision Consultants: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; European Haemophilia Consortium: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.
    • Effect of Moderate and Severe Hemophilia a on Daily Life in Children and Their Caregivers: A CHESS Paediatrics Study Analysis

      Khair, Kate; Nissen, Francis; Silkey, Mariabeth; Burke, Tom; Shang, Aijing; Aizenas, Martynas; Meier, Oliver; O'Hara, Jamie; Noone, Declan (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
      Introduction: Hemophilia A (HA) is a congenital bleeding disorder, caused by a deficiency in clotting factor VIII (FVIII) and characterized by uncontrolled bleeding and progressive joint damage. This analysis assesses the impact of disease burden on the daily life of children with hemophilia A (CwHA) and their caregivers, addressing a deficit of current research on this topic. Methods: The Cost of Haemophilia in Europe: a Socioeconomic Survey in a Paediatric Population (CHESS Paediatrics) is a retrospective, burden-of-illness study in children with moderate and severe HA (defined by endogenous FVIII [IU/dL] relative to normal; moderate, 1-5%; severe, <1%) across France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. CwHA were recruited and stratified by both age group (0-5 years:6-11 years:12-17 years=1:1:1) and disease severity (severe:moderate=approximately 2:1, prioritizing children with severe HA [CwSHA]). Data for this analysis were captured from physicians, children, and their caregivers. Physicians completed online case report forms for treated children, and the child and/or their caregivers completed a paper-based questionnaire utilizing 5-point Likert scales. For CwHA aged 0-7, the questionnaire was completed by the caregiver, while for CwHA aged 8-17, children and caregivers completed different sections. Hours of care provided by the caregiver and work lost by the caregiver were reported as median values due to non-normal data distribution. Informed consent was obtained for all participants. Upon review, the study was approved by the University of Chester ethical committee. Results: Data from child/caregiver questionnaires were available for 196 CwHA (moderate, 25.5%; severe, 74.5%); the majority of these children, as expected, were receiving prophylaxis (72.4%), and did not have FVIII inhibitors (89.8%; Table 1). There was a direct impact of disease burden on CwHA, particularly with regard to physical and social activities (Figure 1). Overall, it was agreed or strongly agreed by the child or caregiver that 48.0% and 57.5% of children with moderate HA (CwMHA) and CwSHA respectively, have reduced physical activity due to HA, and 46.0% and 57.5%, respectively, have reduced social activity due to HA. A total of 36.0% and 61.0% of CwMHA and CwSHA, respectively, had adapted their treatment in anticipation of physical or social activity (Table 1). Furthermore, 34.0% of CwMHA and 55.4% of CwSHA were frustrated due to their disease, and many (CwMHA, 36.0%; CwSHA, 50.7%) felt that they had missed opportunities (Figure 1). For 66.0% of CwMHA and 76.0% of CwSHA, it was reported that their daily life was compromised due to their HA. Caregivers provided a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 19.0 (10.0-59.5) and 12.0 (5.0-20.0) hours a week of care for the hemophilia-related needs of their CwMHA (n=30) or CwSHA (n=105), respectively. Of those who responded, 17.4% (n=4/23) and 25.0% (n=20/80) of caregivers to CwMHA or CwSHA, respectively, stated they have lost work due to their caregiving duty. This was more than twice as common for caregivers in families with multiple CwHA (42.9%, n=9/21 responses) compared with those in families with one CwHA (18.5%, n=15/81 responses). Median (IQR) hours of work per week estimated to be lost were 20.0 (17.0-22.0) for caregivers of CwMHA (n=4) and 12.5 (4.50-20.0) for caregivers of CwSHA (n=20). Conclusions: In conclusion, both children and caregivers make sacrifices in their daily lives due to HA; many CwHA reported reduced physical and social activities, fewer opportunities and feelings of frustration due to their HA. Caregivers reported spending a significant number of hours caring for their child and some reported losing work due to their caring responsibilities. However, some outcomes may be limited by the small number of respondents and narrow response options, particularly those regarding the caregiver burden. Responses on the hours of work lost may be subject to selection bias, as caregivers who have lost work may be more likely to respond to this question. Additionally, as this question is targeted at caregivers in employment, it is unknown if some caregivers have left employment due to their caregiving responsibilities. According to this analysis, children/caregivers are frequently required to adapt the child's treatment before the child engages in activities. Overall, the burden of disease was similar in children with moderate and severe HA. Disclosures Khair: Takeda: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Bayer: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Biomarin: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Consultancy; Novo Nordisk: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Medikhair: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sobi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; CSL Behring: Honoraria, Research Funding; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Honoraria, Research Funding; Haemnet: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Nissen:GSK: Research Funding; Novartis: Research Funding; Actelion: Consultancy; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment. Silkey:Aerotek AG: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Burke:HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Shang:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Other: All authors received support for third party writing assistance, furnished by Scott Battle, PhD, provided by F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland.. Aizenas:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Meier:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Noone:Research Investigator PROBE: Research Funding; Healthcare Decision Consultants: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; European Haemophilia Consortium: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.