• Tiagabine add-on therapy for drug-resistant focal epilepsy

      Bresnahan, Rebecca; Martin-McGill, Kirsty J; Hutton, Jane L; Marson, Anthony G (Wiley, 2019-10-14)
    • Ketogenic diets for drug-resistant epilepsy

      Martin-McGill, Kirsty J; Bresnahan, Rebecca; Levy, Robert G; Cooper, Paul N (Wiley, 2020-06-24)
    • Evidence of a disability paradox in patient-reported outcomes in haemophilia.

      O'Hara, Jamie; Martin, Antony P; Nugent, Diane; Witkop, Michelle; orcid: 0000-0003-0758-286X; Buckner, Tyler W; Skinner, Mark W; orcid: 0000-0002-0934-0680; O'Mahony, Brian; Mulhern, Brendan; Morgan, George; orcid: 0000-0003-2014-3415; Li, Nanxin; et al. (2021-02-17)
      People with inherited and long-term conditions such as haemophilia have been shown to adapt to their levels of disability, often reporting better quality of life (QoL) than expected from the general population (the disability paradox). To investigate the disability paradox in people with haemophilia in the United States by examining preference differences in health state valuations versus the general population. We conducted a discrete choice experiment including duration to capture valuations of health states based on patient-reported preferences. Participants indicated their preferences for hypothetical health states using the EQ-5D-5L, where each participant completed 15 of the 120 choice tasks. Response inconsistencies were evaluated with dominated and repeated scenarios. Conditional-logit regressions with random sampling of the general population responses were used to match the sample of patients with haemophilia. We compared model estimates and derived preferences associated with EQ-5D-5L health states. After removing respondents with response inconsistencies, 1327/2138 (62%) participants remained (177/283 haemophilia; 1150/1900 general population). Patients with haemophilia indicated higher preference value for 99% of EQ-5D-5L health states compared to the general population (when matched on age and gender). The mean health state valuation difference of 0.17 indicated a meaningful difference compared to a minimal clinically important difference threshold of 0.07. Results were consistent by haemophilia type and severity. Our findings indicated the presence of a disability paradox among patients with haemophilia, who reported higher health states than the general population, suggesting the impact of haemophilia may be underestimated if general population value sets are used. [Abstract copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Haemophilia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.]
    • Effect of breakfast cereal type on portion size and nutritional implications.

      Lewis, Isabelle M; Boote, Lucy; Butler, Tom; orcid: 0000-0003-0818-1566 (2021-02-17)
      The present study aimed to assess the effect of different types of breakfast cereal on portion size and the nutritional implications of potential under or overserving. A cross-sectional analysis was performed using one BC from the 7 established BC manufacturing methods (flaking [F], gun puffed [GP], oven puffed [OP], extruded gun puffed [EGP], shredded wholegrain [SW], biscuit formed [BF], and granola). Participants were asked to pour cereal as if they were serving themselves (freepour). Difference between the freepour and recommended serving size (RSS) were calculated (DFR). The Friedman test followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test was used to test for a significant differences between cereal categories. City of Chester, North West of the UK. Adults (n=169; n=110 female, 32±18 years). Freepour values were greater than RSS for all categories of BC. Median values for denser cereals such as SW, granola and oats were significantly (P<0.001) greater than all other categories with granola having the highest median freepour value of 95 g. Median (and range of) DFR weight values for granola were significantly higher than other BCs (50.0 g [-24.0-267.0g], P<0.001). BCs with the lowest median DFRs were F1 (7.0 g [-20-63.0g]), GP (6.0 g [-26.0-69.0g]), EGP (6.0 g [-26.0-56.0g]), OP (5.0 g [-27.0-53.0g]), and BF (0.0 g [-28.2-56.4g]). The degree of overserving may be related to the type of BC with denser cereals more readily overserved. Encouraging manufacturers to reformulate cereals and improving their nutritional properties may have benefit in reducing excess energy intake.
    • Felbamate add-on therapy for drug-resistant focal epilepsy

      Shi, Li LI; Bresnahan, Rebecca; Martin-McGill, Kirsty J; Dong, JianCheng; Ni, HengJian; Geng, JinSong (Wiley, 2019-08-01)
    • Trends in Scientific Publishing on Sustainability in Higher Education

      Filho, Walter Leal; orcid: 0000-0002-1241-5225; Salvia, Amanda Lange; orcid: 0000-0002-4549-7685; Frankenberger, Fernanda; orcid: 0000-0003-0183-0738; Wall, Tony; Hindley, Ann; Mifsud, Mark; Brandli, Luciana; Will, Markus; orcid: 0000-0003-2288-1139
      It is widely acknowledged that research and publications in peer reviewed journals offer important metrics in describing the academic outputs of higher education institutions on one hand, and their societal impacts on the other. Peer review is a well-tested method for quality control and has been successfully deployed over many decades in academic journals worldwide. But despite the fact that publications on matters related to sustainable development offer solid evidence of academic activity and excellence, there is a dearth of literature in this field. In order to address this need, the European School of Sustainability Science and Research (ESSSR) and the Inter-University Sustainable Development Research Programme (IUSDRP) have undertaken the World Survey on Sustainability Publishing and Research in Higher Education (WSSSP-HEI). The paper has two main aims. The first is to document and showcase trends in scientific publishing on matters related to sustainable development. The second aim is to contribute to a greater understanding of this rapidly growing field, by describing the latest developments and the role played by some of the journals active in this area. Consistent with these aims, this paper focuses on publications on sustainability in higher education, describes the methods used in the study and some of its results. It can be seen that despite the intrinsic value of research on sustainable development in higher education as a whole, and of publications in this field in particular, such practices are not as widely developed as one could expect. This paper discusses the possible reasons and also outlines some measures via which higher education institutions may be able to take more advantage of the many opportunities that publishing on sustainability offers to them.
    • Clobazam add-on therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy

      Bresnahan, Rebecca; Martin-McGill, Kirsty J; Williamson, John; Michael, Benedict D; Marson, Anthony G (Wiley, 2019-10-22)
    • Sulthiame add-on therapy for epilepsy

      Bresnahan, Rebecca; Martin-McGill, Kirsty J; Milburn-McNulty, Philip; Powell, Graham; Sills, Graeme J; Marson, Anthony G (Wiley, 2019-08-27)
    • Adult lifetime cost of hemophilia B management in the US: Payer and societal perspectives from a decision analytic model.

      Li, Nanxin; Sawyer, Eileen K; Maruszczyk, Konrad; orcid: 0000-0002-0173-5020; Guzauskas, Greg; orcid: 0000-0002-9095-1672; Slomka, Marta T; Burke, Tom; Martin, Antony P; O'Hara, Jamie; Stevenson, Matt; Recht, Michael (2021-02-16)
      Hemophilia B (HB) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by bleeding-related complications which are managed by prophylactic or post-bleeding event ("on-demand") replacement of clotting factor IX (FIX). The standard of care for severe HB is life-long prophylaxis with standard half-life (SHL) or extended half-life (EHL) products given every 2-3 or 7-14 days, respectively. FIX treatment costs in the US have been investigated, but the lifetime costs of HB treatment have not been well characterized, particularly related to the impact of joint health deterioration and associated health resource utilization. We developed a decision-analytic model to explore outcomes, costs and underlying cost drivers associated with FIX treatment options over the lifetime of an adult with severe or moderately severe HB. With participation from clinicians, health technology assessment specialists and patient advocates, a Markov model was constructed to estimate bleeding events and costs associated with health states including 'bleed into joint', 'bleed not into joint', 'no bleed' and death. Sub-models of joint health were based on 0, 1, or ≥2 areas of chronic joint damage. US third-party payer and societal perspectives were considered with a lifetime horizon; sensitivity analyses tested the robustness of primary findings. Total adult lifetime costs per patient with severe and moderately severe HB were $21,086,607 for SHL FIX prophylaxis, $22,987,483 for EHL FIX prophylaxis, and $20,971,826 for on-demand FIX treatment. For FIX prophylaxis, the cost of FIX treatment account for >90% of the total HB treatment costs. This decision analytic model demonstrated significant economic burden associated with the current HB treatment paradigm.
    • An Exploration into the Impact of Social Networking Site (SNS) Use on Body Image and Eating Behavior of Physically Active Men

      Flannery, Orla; orcid: 0000-0002-4348-2156; Harris, Kerrie; Kenny, Ursula Anne (SAGE Publications, 2020-04-02)
      The rapid proliferation of social networking sites (SNSs) has transformed the way people now socialize and communicate. SNSs have been recognized to contribute to body image (BI) dissatisfaction and disordered eating behavior (EB). Few qualitative studies have explored this issue in men. The aim of the current study was to investigate male SNS use and possible impacts on BI and EB. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight men in the United Kingdom. Interviews aimed to examine men’s views on the potential impact of SNSs on BI and EB. Data were thematically analyzed. Findings suggested that SNSs may be a useful nutrition idea tool and motivational platform for men to improve their diet and exercise uptake. However, results also indicated that SNS use may contribute to BI dissatisfaction and increased risk of disorder. Future research may identify risk factors of SNS use, male BI concerns, and eating pathology across the lifespan.
    • The challenge of relational referents in early word extensions: Evidence from noun-noun compounds.

      Snape, Simon; Krott, Andrea (2021-02-15)
      Young children struggle more with mapping novel words onto relational referents (e.g., verbs) compared to non-relational referents (e.g., nouns). We present further evidence for this notion by investigating children's extensions of noun-noun compounds, which map onto combinations of non-relational referents, i.e., objects (e.g., baby and bottle for baby bottle), and relations (e.g., a bottle FOR babies). We tested two- to five-year-olds' and adults' generalisations of novel compounds composed of novel (e.g., kig donka) or familiar (e.g., star hat) nouns that were combined by one of two relations (e.g., donka that has a kig attached (=attachment relation) versus donka that stores a kig (=function relation)). Participants chose between a relational (shared relation) and a non-relational (same colour) match. Results showed a developmental shift from encoding non-relational aspects (colour) towards relations of compound referents, supporting the challenge of relational word referents. Also, attachment relations were more frequently encoded than function relations.
    • Evidence of a disability paradox in patient‐reported outcomes in haemophilia

      O’Hara, Jamie; Martin, Antony P.; Nugent, Diane; Witkop, Michelle; orcid: 0000-0003-0758-286X; Buckner, Tyler W.; Skinner, Mark W.; orcid: 0000-0002-0934-0680; O’Mahony, Brian; Mulhern, Brendan; Morgan, George; orcid: 0000-0003-2014-3415; Li, Nanxin; et al. (Wiley, 2021-02-17)
    • Adult lifetime cost of hemophilia B management in the US: Payer and societal perspectives from a decision analytic model

      Li, Nanxin; Sawyer, Eileen K.; Maruszczyk, Konrad; orcid: 0000-0002-0173-5020; Guzauskas, Greg; orcid: 0000-0002-9095-1672; Slomka, Marta T.; Burke, Tom; Martin, Antony P.; O’Hara, Jamie; Stevenson, Matt; Recht, Michael (Informa UK Limited, 2021-02-16)
    • Attachment theory: developments, debates and recent applications in social work, social care and education

      Harlow, Elizabeth; orcid: 0000-0001-5031-7485 (Informa UK Limited, 2019-12-16)
    • Dynamics of Shadow System of a Singular Gierer–Meinhardt System on an Evolving Domain

      Kavallaris, Nikos I.; orcid: 0000-0002-9743-8636; email: n.kavallaris@chester.ac.uk; Barreira, Raquel; Madzvamuse, Anotida; orcid: 0000-0002-9511-8903 (Springer US, 2020-12-18)
      Abstract: The main purpose of the current paper is to contribute towards the comprehension of the dynamics of the shadow system of a singular Gierer–Meinhardt model on an isotropically evolving domain. In the case where the inhibitor’s response to the activator’s growth is rather weak, then the shadow system of the Gierer–Meinhardt model is reduced to a single though non-local equation whose dynamics is thoroughly investigated throughout the manuscript. The main focus is on the derivation of blow-up results for this non-local equation, which can be interpreted as instability patterns of the shadow system. In particular, a diffusion-driven instability (DDI), or Turing instability, in the neighbourhood of a constant stationary solution, which then is destabilised via diffusion-driven blow-up, is observed. The latter indicates the formation of some unstable patterns, whilst some stability results of global-in-time solutions towards non-constant steady states guarantee the occurrence of some stable patterns. Most of the theoretical results are verified numerically, whilst the numerical approach is also used to exhibit the dynamics of the shadow system when analytical methods fail.
    • Quantifying the impact of tissue metabolism on solute transport in feto-placental microvascular networks

      Erlich, Alexander; orcid: 0000-0002-2294-1894; Nye, Gareth A.; orcid: 0000-0003-4508-0406; Brownbill, Paul; orcid: 0000-0002-8328-7072; Jensen, Oliver E.; orcid: 0000-0003-0172-6578; Chernyavsky, Igor L.; orcid: 0000-0003-0284-9318 (The Royal Society, 2019-08-16)
      The primary exchange units in the human placenta are terminal villi, in which fetal capillary networks are surrounded by a thin layer of villous tissue, separating fetal from maternal blood. To understand how the complex spatial structure of villi influences their function, we use an image-based theoretical model to study the effect of tissue metabolism on the transport of solutes from maternal blood into the fetal circulation. For solute that is taken up under first-order kinetics, we show that the transition between flow-limited and diffusion-limited transport depends on two new dimensionless parameters defined in terms of key geometric quantities, with strong solute uptake promoting flow-limited transport conditions. We present a simple algebraic approximation for solute uptake rate as a function of flow conditions, metabolic rate and villous geometry. For oxygen, accounting for nonlinear kinetics using physiological parameter values, our model predicts that villous metabolism does not significantly impact oxygen transfer to fetal blood, although the partitioning of fluxes between the villous tissue and the capillary network depends strongly on the flow regime.
    • In vitro and computational modelling of drug delivery across the outer blood–retinal barrier

      Davies, Alys E.; orcid: 0000-0002-3489-0182; Williams, Rachel L.; Lugano, Gaia; Pop, Serban R.; Kearns, Victoria R.; orcid: 0000-0003-1426-6048 (The Royal Society, 2020-02-14)
      The ability to produce rapid, cost-effective and human-relevant data has the potential to accelerate the development of new drug delivery systems. Intraocular drug delivery is an area undergoing rapid expansion, due to the increase in sight-threatening diseases linked to increasing age and lifestyle factors. The outer blood–retinal barrier (OBRB) is important in this area of drug delivery, as it separates the eye from the systemic blood flow. This study reports the development of complementary in vitro and in silico models to study drug transport from silicone oil across the OBRB. Monolayer cultures of a human retinal pigmented epithelium cell line, ARPE-19, were added to chambers and exposed to a controlled flow to simulate drug clearance across the OBRB. Movement of dextran molecules and release of ibuprofen from silicone oil in this model were measured. Corresponding simulations were developed using COMSOL Multiphysics computational fluid dynamics software and validated using independent in vitro datasets. Computational simulations were able to predict dextran movement and ibuprofen release, with all of the features of the experimental release profiles being observed in the simulated data. Simulated values for peak concentrations of permeated dextran and ibuprofen released from silicone oil were within 18% of the in vitro results. This model could be used as a predictive tool for drug transport across this important tissue.