• Late diagnosis of isolated central diabetes insipidus secondary to congenital toxoplasmosis-case report.

      Omer, Tahir; orcid: 0000-0003-1832-6204; Khan, Mustafa; Western, Thomas (2020-11-24)
      Congenital toxoplasmosis is an uncommon infection. Hypothalamic/pituitary involvement leading to isolated central diabetes insipidus is extremely rare. Making a correct diagnosis of this condition, albeit challenging, is crucial for adequate management. We present a 54-year-old female who developed central diabetes insipidus as a complication of congenital toxoplasmosis. She had polydipsia and hypernatraemia on presentation and responded to intranasal desmopressin with normalization of above-mentioned findings. Magnetic resonance imaging and cranial X-ray's showed pronounced intracranial calcifications in both choroid plexuses. Thyroid function tests, serum cortisol level and anterior pituitary function were all normal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolated diabetes insipidus due to congenital toxoplasmosis in literature diagnosed late in adulthood and gives an insight into the challenges of diagnosing central diabetes insipidus and the hypothalamic/pituitary involvement in cases of congenital toxoplasmosis. [Abstract copyright: © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.]
    • Late diagnosis of isolated central diabetes insipidus secondary to congenital toxoplasmosis—case report

      Omer, Tahir; orcid: 0000-0003-1832-6204; Khan, Mustafa; Western, Thomas (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2020-11-24)
      ABSTRACT Congenital toxoplasmosis is an uncommon infection. Hypothalamic/pituitary involvement leading to isolated central diabetes insipidus is extremely rare. Making a correct diagnosis of this condition, albeit challenging, is crucial for adequate management. We present a 54-year-old female who developed central diabetes insipidus as a complication of congenital toxoplasmosis. She had polydipsia and hypernatraemia on presentation and responded to intranasal desmopressin with normalization of above-mentioned findings. Magnetic resonance imaging and cranial X-ray’s showed pronounced intracranial calcifications in both choroid plexuses. Thyroid function tests, serum cortisol level and anterior pituitary function were all normal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolated diabetes insipidus due to congenital toxoplasmosis in literature diagnosed late in adulthood and gives an insight into the challenges of diagnosing central diabetes insipidus and the hypothalamic/pituitary involvement in cases of congenital toxoplasmosis.