• Evidence of a disability paradox in patient-reported outcomes in haemophilia.

      O'Hara, Jamie; Martin, Antony P; Nugent, Diane; Witkop, Michelle; orcid: 0000-0003-0758-286X; Buckner, Tyler W; Skinner, Mark W; orcid: 0000-0002-0934-0680; O'Mahony, Brian; Mulhern, Brendan; Morgan, George; orcid: 0000-0003-2014-3415; Li, Nanxin; et al. (2021-02-17)
      People with inherited and long-term conditions such as haemophilia have been shown to adapt to their levels of disability, often reporting better quality of life (QoL) than expected from the general population (the disability paradox). To investigate the disability paradox in people with haemophilia in the United States by examining preference differences in health state valuations versus the general population. We conducted a discrete choice experiment including duration to capture valuations of health states based on patient-reported preferences. Participants indicated their preferences for hypothetical health states using the EQ-5D-5L, where each participant completed 15 of the 120 choice tasks. Response inconsistencies were evaluated with dominated and repeated scenarios. Conditional-logit regressions with random sampling of the general population responses were used to match the sample of patients with haemophilia. We compared model estimates and derived preferences associated with EQ-5D-5L health states. After removing respondents with response inconsistencies, 1327/2138 (62%) participants remained (177/283 haemophilia; 1150/1900 general population). Patients with haemophilia indicated higher preference value for 99% of EQ-5D-5L health states compared to the general population (when matched on age and gender). The mean health state valuation difference of 0.17 indicated a meaningful difference compared to a minimal clinically important difference threshold of 0.07. Results were consistent by haemophilia type and severity. Our findings indicated the presence of a disability paradox among patients with haemophilia, who reported higher health states than the general population, suggesting the impact of haemophilia may be underestimated if general population value sets are used. [Abstract copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Haemophilia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.]
    • Patient‐relevant health outcomes for hemophilia care: Development of an international standard outcomes set

      Balen, Erna C.; orcid: 0000-0002-3678-6581; O'Mahony, Brian; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Dolan, Gerard; Blanchette, Victor S.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gue, Deborah; O'Hara, Jamie; Iorio, Alfonso; orcid: 0000-0002-3331-8766; Jackson, Shannon; et al. (Wiley, 2021-03-06)
    • Patient‐relevant health outcomes for hemophilia care: Development of an international standard outcomes set

      van Balen, Erna C.; orcid: 0000-0002-3678-6581; O'Mahony, Brian; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Dolan, Gerard; Blanchette, Victor S.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gue, Deborah; O'Hara, Jamie; Iorio, Alfonso; orcid: 0000-0002-3331-8766; Jackson, Shannon; et al. (2021-03-06)
      Abstract: Background: Patient‐relevant health outcomes for persons with hemophilia should be identified and prioritized to optimize and individualize care for persons with hemophilia. Therefore, an international group of persons with hemophilia and multidisciplinary health care providers set out to identify a globally applicable standard set of health outcomes relevant to all individuals with hemophilia. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to identify possible health outcomes and risk adjustment variables. Persons with hemophilia and multidisciplinary health care providers were involved in an iterative nominal consensus process to select the most important health outcomes and risk adjustment variables for persons with hemophilia. Recommendations were made for outcome measurement instruments. Results: Persons with hemophilia were defined as all men and women with an X‐linked inherited bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX with plasma activity levels <40 IU/dL. We recommend collecting the following 10 health outcomes at least annually, if applicable: (i) cure, (ii) impact of disease on life expectancy, (iii) ability to engage in normal daily activities, (iv) severe bleeding episodes, (v) number of days lost from school or work, (vi) chronic pain, (vii) disease and treatment complications, (viii) sustainability of physical functioning, (ix) social functioning, and (x) mental health. Validated clinical as well as patient‐reported outcome measurement instruments were endorsed. Demographic factors, baseline clinical factors, and treatment factors were identified as risk‐adjustment variables. Conclusion: A consensus‐based international set of health outcomes relevant to all persons with hemophilia, and corresponding measurement instruments, was identified for use in clinical care to facilitate harmonized longitudinal monitoring and comparison of outcomes.