• Targeting molecular quantum memory with embedded error correction.

      Lockyer, Selena J; Chiesa, Alessandro; orcid: 0000-0003-2955-3998; Timco, Grigore A; orcid: 0000-0003-0966-0315; McInnes, Eric J L; Bennett, Tom S; Vitorica-Yrezebal, Inigo J; orcid: 0000-0001-8806-150X; Carretta, Stefano; orcid: 0000-0002-2536-1326; Winpenny, Richard E P; orcid: 0000-0002-7101-3963 (2021-06-02)
      The implementation of a quantum computer requires both to protect information from environmental noise and to implement quantum operations efficiently. Achieving this by a fully fault-tolerant platform, in which quantum gates are implemented within quantum-error corrected units, poses stringent requirements on the coherence and control of such hardware. A more feasible architecture could consist of connected memories, that support error-correction by enhancing coherence, and processing units, that ensure fast manipulations. We present here a supramolecular {Cr<sub>7</sub>Ni}-Cu system which could form the elementary unit of this platform, where the electronic spin 1/2 of {Cr<sub>7</sub>Ni} provides the processor and the naturally isolated nuclear spin 3/2 of the Cu ion is used to encode a logical unit with embedded quantum error-correction. We demonstrate by realistic simulations that microwave pulses allow us to rapidly implement gates on the processor and to swap information between the processor and the quantum memory. By combining the storage into the Cu nuclear spin with quantum error correction, information can be protected for times much longer than the processor coherence.
    • Targeting molecular quantum memory with embedded error correction.

      Lockyer, Selena J; Chiesa, Alessandro; orcid: 0000-0003-2955-3998; Timco, Grigore A; orcid: 0000-0003-0966-0315; McInnes, Eric J L; Bennett, Tom S; Vitorica-Yrezebal, Inigo J; orcid: 0000-0001-8806-150X; Carretta, Stefano; orcid: 0000-0002-2536-1326; Winpenny, Richard E P; orcid: 0000-0002-7101-3963 (2021-06-02)
      The implementation of a quantum computer requires both to protect information from environmental noise and to implement quantum operations efficiently. Achieving this by a fully fault-tolerant platform, in which quantum gates are implemented within quantum-error corrected units, poses stringent requirements on the coherence and control of such hardware. A more feasible architecture could consist of connected memories, that support error-correction by enhancing coherence, and processing units, that ensure fast manipulations. We present here a supramolecular {Cr Ni}-Cu system which could form the elementary unit of this platform, where the electronic spin 1/2 of {Cr Ni} provides the processor and the naturally isolated nuclear spin 3/2 of the Cu ion is used to encode a logical unit with embedded quantum error-correction. We demonstrate by realistic simulations that microwave pulses allow us to rapidly implement gates on the processor and to swap information between the processor and the quantum memory. By combining the storage into the Cu nuclear spin with quantum error correction, information can be protected for times much longer than the processor coherence. [Abstract copyright: This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.]
    • Ultra-thin g-C

      Liu, Chengcheng; Luo, Tian; Sheveleva, Alena M; Han, Xue; Kang, Xinchen; orcid: 0000-0003-0593-0840; Sapchenko, Sergei; Tuna, Floriana; orcid: 0000-0002-5541-1750; McInnes, Eric J L; Han, Buxing; orcid: 0000-0003-0440-809X; Yang, Sihai; orcid: 0000-0002-1111-9272; et al. (2021-07-05)
      growth of the metal-organic framework material MFM-300(Fe) on an ultra-thin sheet of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C N ) has been achieved exfoliation of bulk carbon nitride using supercritical CO . The resultant hybrid structure, CNNS/MFM-300(Fe), comprising carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) and MFM-300(Fe), shows excellent performance towards photocatalytic aerobic oxidation of benzylic C-H groups at room temperature under visible light. The catalytic activity is significantly improved compared to the parent g-C N , MFM-300(Fe) or physical mixtures of both. This facile strategy for preparing heterojunction photocatalysts demonstrates a green pathway for the efficient and economic oxidation of benzylic carbons to produce fine chemicals. [Abstract copyright: This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.]