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  • Nutrition knowledge and dietary intake of hurlers

    Murphy, John; orcid: 0000-0002-8337-722X; O’Reilly, James (SAGE Publications, 2020-11-26)
    The current study investigated the association between sports nutrition knowledge and dietary quality in a sample of adult Irish male hurling players. Nutrition knowledge was measured by the validated Sports Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (SNKQ). Diet quality was measured by the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS) calculated from food frequency questionnaire data. Analysis of variance and linear modelling were used to assess associations between variables. A total of 265 (129 elite, 136 sub-elite) players were recruited. No significant difference in nutrition knowledge (SNKQ) was found between groups. Results showed a significant difference (p = 0.02; d = 0.39 ± 0.25; small) in food score (ARFS) between groups. A weak, positive association (r = 0.3, p = 0.007) was found between nutrition knowledge and food score. Elite level players, aged 28–32, with college degrees, that have previously received nutritional guidance displayed the highest levels of both nutrition knowledge and food score. Higher levels of nutrition knowledge and food score were expected in elite players, however were only found in food score. Nutrition knowledge does contribute to dietary quality although future interventions should focus on specific gaps in knowledge such as how to meet total energy/carbohydrate requirements.
  • Structure and dielectric properties of double A-site doped bismuth sodium titanate relaxor ferroelectrics for high power energy storage applications

    Zhang, Hangfeng; orcid: 0000-0002-3928-8772; Yang, Bin; orcid: 0000-0001-5620-9506; Fortes, A. Dominic; orcid: 0000-0001-5907-2285; Yan, Haixue; orcid: 0000-0002-4563-1100; Abrahams, Isaac; orcid: 0000-0002-8606-6056 (Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), 2020)
    The structural and dielectric properties of barium/strontium substituted Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 were examined in compositions of general formula (Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3)x(Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3)1−x.
  • Refining the blank line‐up procedure: How should we instruct eyewitnesses?

    Kucina, Talira; Sauer, James D.; Holt, Glenys A.; Brewer, Neil; Palmer, Matthew A.; orcid: 0000-0002-3467-3364 (Wiley, 2020-08-19)
  • Enhanced design of an offgrid PV-battery-methanation hybrid energy system for power/gas supply

    Xu, Xiao; Hu, Weihao; Cao, Di; Liu, Wen; Huang, Qi; Hu, Yanting; Chen, Zhe
    Extensive studies have been carried out on various hybrid energy systems (HESs) for providing electricity to off-grid areas. However, a standalone HES that is capable of providing power and gas, has been less studied. In this paper, a standalone Photovoltaic (PV)-battery-methanation HES is proposed to provide adequate, reliable and cost-effective electricity and gas to the local consumers. Identifying a potential solution to maximize the reliability of the system, asked by consumers, and to minimize costs required by the investors is challenging. Bi-level programming is adopted in this study to tackle the pre-mentioned issue. In the outer layer, an optimal design is obtained by means of particle swarm optimization. In the inner layer, an optimal operation strategy is found under the optimal design of the outer layer using sequential quadratic programming. The results indicate that 1) The bi-level programming used in this study can find the optimal solution; 2) The proposed HES is proved to be able to supply power and gas simultaneously. 3) Compared with the right most and leftmost points on Pareto set, the total costs are reduced by 17.77% and 2.16%.
  • Columnar self-assembly, electrochemical and luminescence properties of basket-shaped liquid crystalline derivatives of Schiff-base-moulded p-tert-butyl-calix[4]arene

    Sharma, Vinay S.; orcid: 0000-0003-4970-0676; Sharma, Anuj S.; Worthington, Sheena J. B.; Shah, Priyanka A.; orcid: 0000-0002-1386-6984; Shrivastav, Pranav S.; orcid: 0000-0002-1284-1558 (Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), 2020)
    A new family of blue-light emitting supramolecular basket-shaped liquid crystalline compounds based on p-tert-butyl-calix[4]arene core to form self-assembly and columnar hexagonal phase.
  • Transitions to higher education: the case of students with vocational background

    Katartzi, Eugenia; orcid: 0000-0003-1303-8916; Hayward, Geoff (Informa UK Limited, 2019-04-27)
  • Population Health Screening after Environmental Pollution

    Stewart, Alex G.; orcid: 0000-0002-4931-5340; email: dragonsteeth@doctors.org.uk; Wilkinson, Ewan; orcid: 0000-0002-2167-8756; email: ewilkinson@chester.ac.uk (MDPI, 2020-11-24)
    Following environmental pollution exposure, calls to screen the population for disease or disease markers are often made. Population screening is a cross-sectional review of a population to find latent cases or biomarkers of disease that indicate the possibility of disease development; it differs from environmental screening or an epidemiological survey. Recognized standard approaches have been developed over 60 years to ensure quality and effectiveness in complex programs. We surveyed the literature for papers on health screening following environmental exposures and checked them for reference to accepted criteria such as those of Wilson and Jungner. We applied these criteria to three situations covering source/hazard (arsenic contaminated land), pathway/exposure (radiation release), and receptor/disease (lead poisoning). We identified 36 relevant papers. Although across the papers the whole range of criteria were addressed, no paper or program utilized recognized criteria. Issues and gaps identified included limited strategic approaches, lack of treatment, environmental prevention being seen as the screening outcome instead of treatment of identified individuals, and programs which did not fit the World Health Organization screening description. Robust discussion in the literature is needed to consider the organization and role of health screening following environmental exposures.
  • The role of antibody expression and their association with bladder cancer recurrence: a single-centre prospective clinical-pilot study in 35 patients

    Ella-tongwiis, Peter; Lamb, Rebecca May; Makanga, Alexander; Shergill, Iqbal; Hughes, Stephen Fôn; orcid: 0000-0001-6558-9037; email: Stephen.hughes6@wales.nhs.uk (BioMed Central, 2020-11-25)
    Abstract: Background: Bladder cancer (BC) is the 10th most common cancer in the UK, with about 10,000 new cases annually. About 75–85% of BC are non-muscle invasive (NMIBC), which is associated with high recurrence and progression rates (50–60% within 7–10 years). There are no routine biomarkers currently available for identifying BC patients at increased risk of developing recurrence. The focus of this research study was to evaluate antibody expression in BC patients and their association with cancer recurrence. Methods: 35 patients scheduled for TURBT were recruited after written informed consent. Ethical approval for the project was granted via IRAS (REC4: 14/WA/0033). Following surgical procedure, tissues were preserved in 10% buffered formalin and processed within 24 h in FFPE blocks. 7 sections (4 µm each) were cut from each block and stained for CD31, Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2), S100P, Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), VEGFR-3 thrombomodulin and CEACAM-1 using immunohistochemistry. Clinical outcome measures (obtained via cystoscopy) were monitored for up to 6 months following surgical procedure. Results: There was significantly increased expression of CD31 (p < 0.001), HER-2 (p = 0.032), S100P (p < 0.001), COX-2 (p < 0.001), VEGFR-3 (p < 0.001) and decreased expression of thrombomodulin (p = 0.010) and CEACAM-1 (p < 0.001) in bladder tumours compared to normal bladder tissues. HER-2 expression was also significantly associated with cancer grade (p = 0.003), especially between grade 1 and grade 2 (p = 0.002) and between grade 1 and grade 3 (p = 0.004). There was also a significant association between cancer stage and HER-2 expression (p < 0.001). Although recurrence was significantly associated with cancer grade, there was no association with antibody expression. Conclusion: Findings from the present study may indicate an alternative approach in the monitoring and management of patients with BC. It is proposed that by allowing urological surgeons access to laboratory markers such as HER-2, Thrombomodulin and CD31 (biomarker profile), potentially, in the future, these biomarkers may be used in addition to, or in combination with, currently used scoring systems to predict cancer recurrence. However, verification and validation of these biomarkers are needed using larger cohorts.
  • Concentrated Noir: Reinforcing and transgressing genre boundaries in Echo

    Waller, Rhian (Intellect, 2021-01-01)
    Nordic Noir has emerged as an increasingly codified set of aesthetic, political and philosophical televisual elements. Echo compresses these elements, subjecting them to the crucible of short film. This article investigates the dramatic potential of stripping back cross-genre tropes to reveal the defining characteristics of a newly emergent format.
  • Through the looking glass: The factors that influence consumer trust and distrust in brands

    Mal, Carmen Iuliana; Davies, Gary; Diers-Lawson, Audra (Wiley, 2018-09-27)
  • The impact of factor infusion frequency on health-related quality of life in people with haemophilia

    Pedra, Gabriel; Christoffersen, Pia; Khair, Kate; Lee, Xin Ying; O’Hara, Sonia; O’Hara, Jamie; Pasi, John (Haemnet, 2020-08-15)
    AbstractBackgroundSome studies suggest that people with haemophilia (PwH) who use prophylaxis value low frequency of clotting factor administration more than a lower risk of bleeding. However, more frequent infusions offer the potential of reducing joint disease and pain, which in turn may improve functioning and quality of life.AimsTo explore the impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) aspects of haemophilia associated with adherence and annual infusion rate in the context of factors influencing treatment that are important to patients, including prophylaxis, chronic pain, concomitant conditions and hospital admission.Materials and methodsHRQoL was assessed in participants with severe haemophilia in the ‘Cost of Haemophilia in Europe: a Socioeconomic Survey’ (CHESS) study who were using prophylaxis. Patients using on-demand treatment were excluded. This multivariate analysis examined the interaction between factors potentially influencing treatment and HRQoL, and minor and major bleeds.ResultsFrom the total CHESS population (n=1,285), 338 (26%) participants provided responses for major and minor bleeds and target joints, and 145 (11%) provided EQ-5D-3L responses. Major and minor bleeds were associated with pain. Patients with severe chronic pain reported a substantial negative impact on HRQoL; but this was significantly improved by increases in the annual infusion rate. This was not apparent in participants with mild or moderate pain.ConclusionIncreasing the frequency of prophylaxis infusions is associated with improved quality of life in PwH who have severe chronic pain. However, increasing the number of infusions per week in those with mild or moderate chronic pain with the intention of improving prophylactic effect may not have the same effect.
  • Problem Joints and Their Clinical and Humanistic Burden in Children and Adults with Moderate and Severe Hemophilia a: CHESS Paediatrics and CHESS II

    McLaughlin, Paul; Hermans, Cedric; Asghar, Sohaib; Burke, Tom; Nissen, Francis; Aizenas, Martynas; Meier, Oliver; Dhillon, Harpal; O'Hara, Jamie (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
    Introduction Severe hemophilia A (SHA) is characterized by spontaneous (non-trauma related) bleeding episodes into the joint space and muscle tissue, leading to progressive joint deterioration and chronic pain. Chronic joint damage is most often associated with severe hemophilia, however more recent research has illustrated that people with moderate hemophilia A (MHA) also experience hemophilic arthropathy and functional impairment. The need to measure joint health in children as well as adults, is underscored by findings from the Joint Outcome Continuation Study, which found that FVIII prophylaxis was insufficient to protect joints from damage, from childhood through adolescence in severe HA (Warren et al., 2020). The objective of this analysis is to gain a more patient-centric understanding of the clinical, economic and humanistic burden associated with 'Problem Joints', a measure of joint morbidity developed in consultation with an expert panel to overcome limitations with existing measures, in people with MHA and SHA. Methods A descriptive cohort analysis was conducted, utilizing retrospective, cross-sectional real-world data from the 'Cost of Haemophilia in Europe: a Socioeconomic Survey' (CHESS Paeds and CHESS II), studies of adult and pediatric persons with hemophilia. The analysis population is comprised of children (17 and below) with MHA or SHA in CHESS Paeds, and adults aged 20 and over with MHA or SHA in CHESS II. To account for the possibility that persons aged 18 or 19 in CHESS II may have participated in CHESS Paeds, these individuals were excluded from the analysis. Physician-reported clinical outcome data and patient/caregiver-reported quality of life were analyzed. A problem joint (PJ) is defined as having chronic joint pain and/or limited range of movement due to compromised joint integrity (i.e. chronic synovitis and/or hemophilic arthropathy). Analyses were stratified by number of PJs: none, 1 PJ, and 2+ PJs. We report retrospective data of the 12 months prior to study enrollment, on annualized bleeding rate (ABR), prevalence of target joints (TJ), as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis, and EQ-5D-/5L/Y/Proxy score. Results are presented as mean (standard deviation) or N (%). Results Among 785 participants (N = 464 SHA; N = 321 MHA) in CHESS Paeds, mean age and BMI were 10.33 (4.63) and 22.50 (17.07), respectively. Of 493 participants (aged 20 and above) in CHESS II (N = 298 SHA; N = 195 MHA), the mean age and BMI were 38.61 (14.06) and 24.55 (2.92), respectively. Current inhibitor to FVIII replacement was more prevalent in children than in adults (10% vs. 5%). In CHESS II, approximately 40% of people with MHA and 49% with SHA had one or more PJs, respectively [1 PJ (23% vs. 28%); 2+ PJs (16% vs. 21%)]. In CHESS Paeds, approximately 14% of children with MHA and 18% with SHA had at least one PJ, respectively [1 PJ (9% vs. 14%); 2+ PJs (5% vs. 3%)]. TJs were less prevalent with MHA in comparison to SHA, in both adults (24% vs. 45%) and children (13% vs. 22%). Clinical burden was higher among both children and adults with PJs compared to those with no PJs. ABR correlates with the number of PJs, in those with MHA and SHA in CHESS II (Figure 1). Similarly, PJs were associated with higher ABR across MHA and SHA in CHESS Paeds (Figure 2). Hemophilia-related hospitalizations were higher in both adult and pediatric participants with PJs. In CHESS II, MHA with no PJs had fewer [0.73 (1.23)] hospitalizations compared to having those with 1 PJ [1.38 (1.11)] or 2+ PJs [1.28 (1.25)]. Similarly, children with MHA with 2+ PJs had 1.60 (1.92) hemophilia-related hospitalizations, compared to 1.38 (1.92) with 1 PJ and 0.71 (1.14) with no PJs. PJs were associated with impaired quality of life. In CHESS II, MHA and SHA EQ-5D-5L values in persons with no PJs were 0.81 (0.19) and 0.79 (0.18), respectively, compared to 0.65 (0.16) and 0.62 (0.23) with 1 PJ, and 0.65 (0.14) and 0.51 (0.33) in with 2+ PJs. A similar trend was observed in EQ-5D-Y and EQ-5D-proxy scores in CHESS Paeds. Conclusions Data from CHESS Paeds and CHESS II demonstrate an association between chronic joint damage, as measured by the 'problem joint' definition, and worsening clinical and quality of life outcomes, across both MHA and SHA. Further analyses will seek to expand upon the initial results presented here, to investigate the wider elements of burden associated with compromised long-term joint health. Disclosures McLaughlin: BioMarin: Consultancy; Novo Nordisk: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Sobi: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Roche/Chugai: Speakers Bureau; Takeda: Speakers Bureau. Hermans:Novo Nordisk: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Roche: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Sobi: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Biogen: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; CAF-DCF: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; CSL Behring: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Shire, a Takeda company: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Pfizer: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Bayer: Consultancy, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; WFH: Other; EAHAD: Other; Octapharma: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; Kedrion: Speakers Bureau; LFB: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau. Asghar:HCD Economics: Current Employment. Burke:HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Nissen:GSK: Research Funding; Novartis: Research Funding; Actelion: Consultancy; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment. Aizenas:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Meier:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Dhillon:HCD Economics: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Other: All authors received editorial support for this abstract, furnished by Scott Battle, funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland. . O'Hara:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company.
  • Adherence and a Potential Trade-Off Currently Faced in Optimizing Hemophilia Treatment

    Burke, Tom; Asghar, Sohaib; Misciattelli, Natalia; Kar, Sharmila; Morgan, George; Dhillon, Harpal; O'Hara, Jamie (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
    INTRODUCTION Severe hemophilia, i.e., &amp;lt;1% normal FVIII level (A) or FIX level (B), are congenital bleeding disorders characterized by uncontrolled bleeding. The clinical benefits of prophylactic FVIII/IX replacement therapy are well understood, but require adherence to a schedule of routine infusions. Optimal adherence is associated with better joint outcomes and lower rates of chronic pain. Nonetheless a lack of patient-reported data has to date limited our understanding of the patient burden associated with adherence to treatment, and the relationship between adherence and the ability to work, among people living with hemophilia in the US. Data from the Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study reported a high proportion of adults with hemophilia B receiving routine infusions (at least one infusion per month), showing a negative impact on their ability to work, and people receiving routine infusions were more likely than people treated on-demand to report an inability to work in most situations. The ability of people living with hemophilia to participate in the labor force, without barriers to job choice or working hours, is a key outcome in the drive to achieve health equity. The objective of the analysis is to examine the relationship between adherence and the labor force participation of people with severe hemophilia in the US. METHODS This analysis draws data from a patient-reported study, the 'Cost of Severe Hemophilia Across the US: A Socioeconomic Survey' (CHESS US+). Conducted in 2019, the CHESS US+ study is a cross-sectional patient-centered study of adults with severe hemophilia in the US. A patient-completed questionnaire collected data on clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes, for a 12-month retrospective period. This analysis examines labor force participation and employment status (full-time, part-time, unemployed, retired) and chronic pain categorized by 'none', low-level ('1-5'), and high-level ('6-10'). The analysis was stratified by adherence to treatment, self-reported on a 1-10 scale, from "not at all" to "fully", categorized into low (1-6), moderate (7-9) and full (10) adherence. Results are presented as mean (standard deviation) or N (%). RESULTS The analysis comprised 356 people with severe hemophilia A (73%) and B (27%) who participated in CHESS US+ study. In Table 1, the baseline characteristics of the study population are stratified by full adherence (N = 119), moderate adherence (N=134) and low adherence (N=103). Having no chronic pain was most prevalent in the full adherence group (37.7%), compared to moderate (8.3%) or low (13.9%) adherence cohorts. Chronic pain, both low- and high-levels were least prevalent among people with full adherence. Moreover, people with low adherence were disproportionately more likely to have high-levels of chronic pain relative to moderate adherence or full adherence (Table 1). Unemployment, however, was highest in full adherence (21.1%), and people with full adherence were also least likely to be in full-time employment (42%). The full-time employment rate decreased as adherence declined from full to moderate (Table 1), and was comparable in people with low adherence (57.3%) or moderate adherence (54.5%). CONCLUSIONS This analysis of CHESS US+ examined the complex relationship between labor market outcomes and adherence to treatment, among adults with severe hemophilia in the US. Adherence was associated with lower rates of chronic pain, representing the importance of achieving an optimal treatment strategy. Nonetheless, patients achieving optimal adherence were less likely to be in full-time employment, and more likely to be part-time or unemployed, comparatively. Together, these data characterize a trade-off in clinical outcomes versus workforce participation, and suggest that the goal of achieving health equity may currently still be unmet. Disclosures Burke: HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Asghar:HCD Economics: Current Employment. Misciattelli:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Kar:Freeline: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Morgan:uniQure: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Current Employment. Dhillon:HCD Economics: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Other: All authors received editorial support for this abstract, furnished by Scott Battle, funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland. . O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy.
  • Effect of Moderate and Severe Hemophilia a on Daily Life in Children and Their Caregivers: A CHESS Paediatrics Study Analysis

    Khair, Kate; Nissen, Francis; Silkey, Mariabeth; Burke, Tom; Shang, Aijing; Aizenas, Martynas; Meier, Oliver; O'Hara, Jamie; Noone, Declan (American Society of Hematology, 2020-11-05)
    Introduction: Hemophilia A (HA) is a congenital bleeding disorder, caused by a deficiency in clotting factor VIII (FVIII) and characterized by uncontrolled bleeding and progressive joint damage. This analysis assesses the impact of disease burden on the daily life of children with hemophilia A (CwHA) and their caregivers, addressing a deficit of current research on this topic. Methods: The Cost of Haemophilia in Europe: a Socioeconomic Survey in a Paediatric Population (CHESS Paediatrics) is a retrospective, burden-of-illness study in children with moderate and severe HA (defined by endogenous FVIII [IU/dL] relative to normal; moderate, 1-5%; severe, &amp;lt;1%) across France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. CwHA were recruited and stratified by both age group (0-5 years:6-11 years:12-17 years=1:1:1) and disease severity (severe:moderate=approximately 2:1, prioritizing children with severe HA [CwSHA]). Data for this analysis were captured from physicians, children, and their caregivers. Physicians completed online case report forms for treated children, and the child and/or their caregivers completed a paper-based questionnaire utilizing 5-point Likert scales. For CwHA aged 0-7, the questionnaire was completed by the caregiver, while for CwHA aged 8-17, children and caregivers completed different sections. Hours of care provided by the caregiver and work lost by the caregiver were reported as median values due to non-normal data distribution. Informed consent was obtained for all participants. Upon review, the study was approved by the University of Chester ethical committee. Results: Data from child/caregiver questionnaires were available for 196 CwHA (moderate, 25.5%; severe, 74.5%); the majority of these children, as expected, were receiving prophylaxis (72.4%), and did not have FVIII inhibitors (89.8%; Table 1). There was a direct impact of disease burden on CwHA, particularly with regard to physical and social activities (Figure 1). Overall, it was agreed or strongly agreed by the child or caregiver that 48.0% and 57.5% of children with moderate HA (CwMHA) and CwSHA respectively, have reduced physical activity due to HA, and 46.0% and 57.5%, respectively, have reduced social activity due to HA. A total of 36.0% and 61.0% of CwMHA and CwSHA, respectively, had adapted their treatment in anticipation of physical or social activity (Table 1). Furthermore, 34.0% of CwMHA and 55.4% of CwSHA were frustrated due to their disease, and many (CwMHA, 36.0%; CwSHA, 50.7%) felt that they had missed opportunities (Figure 1). For 66.0% of CwMHA and 76.0% of CwSHA, it was reported that their daily life was compromised due to their HA. Caregivers provided a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 19.0 (10.0-59.5) and 12.0 (5.0-20.0) hours a week of care for the hemophilia-related needs of their CwMHA (n=30) or CwSHA (n=105), respectively. Of those who responded, 17.4% (n=4/23) and 25.0% (n=20/80) of caregivers to CwMHA or CwSHA, respectively, stated they have lost work due to their caregiving duty. This was more than twice as common for caregivers in families with multiple CwHA (42.9%, n=9/21 responses) compared with those in families with one CwHA (18.5%, n=15/81 responses). Median (IQR) hours of work per week estimated to be lost were 20.0 (17.0-22.0) for caregivers of CwMHA (n=4) and 12.5 (4.50-20.0) for caregivers of CwSHA (n=20). Conclusions: In conclusion, both children and caregivers make sacrifices in their daily lives due to HA; many CwHA reported reduced physical and social activities, fewer opportunities and feelings of frustration due to their HA. Caregivers reported spending a significant number of hours caring for their child and some reported losing work due to their caring responsibilities. However, some outcomes may be limited by the small number of respondents and narrow response options, particularly those regarding the caregiver burden. Responses on the hours of work lost may be subject to selection bias, as caregivers who have lost work may be more likely to respond to this question. Additionally, as this question is targeted at caregivers in employment, it is unknown if some caregivers have left employment due to their caregiving responsibilities. According to this analysis, children/caregivers are frequently required to adapt the child's treatment before the child engages in activities. Overall, the burden of disease was similar in children with moderate and severe HA. Disclosures Khair: Takeda: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Bayer: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Biomarin: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Consultancy; Novo Nordisk: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Medikhair: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sobi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; CSL Behring: Honoraria, Research Funding; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Honoraria, Research Funding; Haemnet: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Nissen:GSK: Research Funding; Novartis: Research Funding; Actelion: Consultancy; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment. Silkey:Aerotek AG: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Burke:HCD Economics: Current Employment; University of Chester: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Shang:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Other: All authors received support for third party writing assistance, furnished by Scott Battle, PhD, provided by F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland.. Aizenas:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Meier:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Noone:Research Investigator PROBE: Research Funding; Healthcare Decision Consultants: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; European Haemophilia Consortium: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.
  • Occurrence of chemical pollutants in major e-waste sites in West Africa and usefulness of cytotoxicity and induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) in determining the effects of some detected brominated flame retardants and e-waste soil-derived extracts.

    Eze, Chukwuebuka ThankGod; orcid: 0000-0001-8076-2926; email: thankgod.eze@fuoye.edu.ng; Michelangeli, Francesco; Otitoloju, Adebayo Akeem; Eze, Obianuju Oluchukwu; Ibraheem, Omodele; Ogbuene, Emeka Bright; Ogunwole, Germaine Akinola (2020-10-25)
    We investigated the occurrence of chemical pollutants in major e-waste sites in West Africa and usefulness of cytotoxicity and induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) in determining the effects of some detected brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and e-waste soil-derived extracts. Analysis of the e-waste site samples using AAS and GC-MS techniques revealed the presence of a range of toxic metals as well as persistent and toxic organic pollutants, respectively, in the vicinity of the e-waste sites. As expected, the occurrence (%) of all the detected chemical pollutants in experimental soils significantly (P < 0.05) differs from occurrence (%) in control soil. The calculated LC values on RBL-2H3 cells of the detected tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were 3.75 μM and 4.2 μM, respectively. Tribromophenol (TBP), dibromobiphenyl (DBB), and decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE) were remarkably less toxic on RBL-2H3 cells compared with TBBPA and HBCD as they did not reduce RBL-2H3 cell viability below 50% in the tested concentration range (0-20 μM). The study revealed that TBBPA and HBCD could induce significant RBL-2H3 cell death through caspase-dependent apoptosis. The study further shows that the cytotoxicity of some of these BFRs could increase synergistically when in mixtures and potentially activate inflammation through the stimulation of mast cell degranulation. The e-waste soil-derived extracts induced a concentration-dependent increase in EROD activity in the exposed RTG-W1 cells. Ultimately, nonpolar extracts had higher EROD-inducing potency compared with polar extracts and hence suggesting the presence in higher amounts of AhR agonists in nonpolar e-waste soil-derived extracts than polar extracts. Overall, there is urgent need for actions in order to improve the environmental quality of the e-waste sites.
  • Low Body Fat Does Not Influence Recovery after Muscle-Damaging Lower-Limb Plyometrics in Young Male Team Sport Athletes

    Fernandes, John F. T.; email: jfmtfernandes@hotmail.co.uk; Lamb, Kevin L.; orcid: 0000-0003-4481-4711; email: k.lamb@chester.ac.uk; Twist, Craig; orcid: 0000-0001-6168-0378; email: c.twist@chester.ac.uk (MDPI, 2020-11-05)
    Aim: This study assessed the influence of fat mass to fat-free mass ratio (FM:FFM) on recovery from plyometric exercise. Method: After assessment of body composition, 20 male team sport players (age 20.7 ± 1.1 years; body mass 77.1 ± 11.5 kg) were divided into low- (n = 10; 0.11 ± 0.03) and normal- (n = 10; 0.27 ± 0.09) fat groups based on FM:FFM ratio. Thereafter, participants completed measurements of knee extensor torque at 60 and 240°∙s−1, countermovement jump flight time, plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and perceived muscle soreness (VAS) before and at 0, 24 and 48 h after 10 × 10 maximal plyometric vertical jumps. Results: Evidence of muscle damage was confirmed by alterations in VAS, peak torque at 60 and 240°∙s−1 and flight time at 0, 24 and 48 h after plyometric exercise (P 0.05). CK was increased at 0 and 24 h (P 0.05) but returned to baseline values by 48 h. No time by group effects were observed for any of the dependent variables (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The current findings indicate that while muscle damage was present after plyometric exercise, the magnitude was similar across the two body composition groups. Applied practitioners can allow for a similar recovery time after plyometric exercise in those with low and normal body fat.
  • Multiscale understanding of electric polarization in poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based ferroelectric polymers

    Meng, Nan; orcid: 0000-0002-7609-0407; Ren, Xintong; orcid: 0000-0003-2472-4866; Zhu, Xiaojing; orcid: 0000-0001-8947-1658; Wu, Jiyue; orcid: 0000-0002-0827-2831; Yang, Bin; orcid: 0000-0001-5620-9506; Gao, Feng; orcid: 0000-0002-5075-4076; Zhang, Han; orcid: 0000-0002-0479-224X; Liao, Yaozu; orcid: 0000-0001-9263-6281; Bilotti, Emiliano; orcid: 0000-0003-3952-1148; Reece, Michael J.; et al. (Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), 2020)
    The electric polarization of ferroelectric polymers with tailored structures was studied using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy technique combined with impedance analysis.

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