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dc.contributor.authorNaden, Emma
dc.contributor.authorSchepman, Astrid
dc.contributor.authorBilton, Gareth
dc.contributor.authorRodway, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-16T10:08:38Z
dc.date.available2023-11-16T10:08:38Z
dc.date.issued2023-10-09
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/628271/2Oct2023_MentalWellness-Revision_PR_AS_EN_GB.pdf?sequence=4
dc.identifier.citationNaden, E., Schepman, A., Bilton, G., & Rodway, P. (2023). Resilience and mental toughness as predictors of anxiety, depression, and mental well-being. Mental Wellness, 1(1). Available from: https://mental-wellness-journal.net/mw/article/view/2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4081/mw.2023.2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/628271
dc.description.abstractTo examine how strongly the attributes of resilience and mental toughness predicted levels of anxiety, depression, and mental well-being, a quantitative online survey of 281 adults was employed. The survey was conducted in the United Kingdom (April to June 2021) using opportunity sampling. Resilience, mental toughness, and mental well-being were measured by the 10-item Connor-Davidson resilience scale, the 10-item mental toughness questionnaire, and the 14-item Warwick-Edinburgh mental well-being scale, respectively. In addition, the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) measured anxiety and depression, and the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) was used to measure depression. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze which attribute was the strongest predictor of mental health. Mental toughness was found to be a significantly stronger predictor of well-being (β=0.54) than resilience (β=0.21), of anxiety (β=-0.70 versus 0.02, respectively), of HADS depression (β=-0.52 versus -0.15), and of PHQ-9 depression (β=-0.62 versus -0.09). We propose that mental toughness may predict well-being more strongly than resilience because it is a broader construct, incorporating proactive traits that enhance well-being. The findings suggest that training and interventions that enhance mental toughness in non-clinical populations may be more effective at promoting mental well-being and reducing anxiety and depression than those that enhance resilience. Further research is required to test these practical implications and to clarify why mental toughness is a stronger predictor than resilience for positive mental health.en_US
dc.publisherPAGEPressen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://mental-wellness-journal.net/mw/article/view/2en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://mental-wellness-journal.net/mwen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectpositive cognitive reappraisalen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjecthopeen_US
dc.subjectadversityen_US
dc.titleResilience and mental toughness as predictors of anxiety, depression, and mental well-beingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn3034-8269
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalMental Wellnessen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.4081/mw.2023.2en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2023-10-03
rioxxterms.publicationdate2023-10-09
dc.date.deposited2023-11-16en_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
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