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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Howard
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-24T11:34:50Z
dc.date.available2022-08-24T11:34:50Z
dc.date.issued2022-09-01
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/627109/Destroy%20the%20%e2%80%98Sutton%20Hoo%20Treasure%e2%80%99%21.pdf?sequence=1
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, H. (2022). Destroy the ‘Sutton Hoo Treasure’! In H. Williams, P. Reavill & S. Clague (Eds.) The Public Archaeology of Treasure (pp. 162-185). Archaeopress.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781803273105en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/627109
dc.descriptionOpen access book chapter. Permission granted by Archaeopress.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis chapter presents a survey and critique of the use of ‘treasure(s)’ to describe the burial assemblage from the Mound 1 ship-burial at Sutton Hoo since its discovery in 1939. I argue that referring to the contents of Mound 1 as ‘treasure(s)’ is not merely misrepresenting, commodifying and sensationalising its funerary context and wider significance. Furthermore, the persistent use of the terms directly relates also to specific, multiple valences which assert and perpetuate a specific interpretation of the grave as a ‘King’s Mound’. Moreover, referring to more than the rare and high-status character of the finds, ‘treasure(s)’ also casts the assemblage’s identity as a ‘national treasure’, legitimising its curation by the British Museum and valorising the benefaction of the landowner who commissioned the 1938 and 1939 excavations: Mrs Edith Pretty. Another key dimension to the use of the term is the assemblage’s perceived relationship with the epic Old English poem Beowulf and the ‘treasures’ it describes. As a label, ‘treasure(s)’ inaccurately and tenaciously sublimates the rich and complex story of the grave, the contexts of the cemetery, locality and region into a simplified simulacrum of early East Anglian/Anglo-Saxon kingship linked to religious conversion and tied to patriotic modern concepts of Englishness. I demonstrate how the use of ‘treasure’ reveals a nexus of Anglo-Saxonist and Germanist ideological readings of the assemblage in academic discourse and popular culture.en_US
dc.publisherArchaeopressen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.archaeopress.com/Archaeopress/Products/9781803273105en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectSutton Hooen_US
dc.subjectarchaeologyen_US
dc.subjectmuseumsen_US
dc.subjectheritage sitesen_US
dc.subjectheritage interpretationen_US
dc.subjectmortuary archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectearly medievalen_US
dc.subjectAnglo-Saxonen_US
dc.titleDestroy the 'Sutton Hoo Treasure'!en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-05-01
rioxxterms.publicationdate2022-09-01


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