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dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorNixon, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorvon Hardenberg, Achaz
dc.contributor.authorGeary, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-28T10:27:18Z
dc.date.available2022-06-28T10:27:18Z
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/626972/OryxManuscript_GiantPangolin_Revised_V7.pdf?sequence=5
dc.identifier.citationMatthews, N., Nixon, S., von Hardenberg, A., Isoke, S., & Geary, M. (2022 - in press). Targeting burrows improves detection in giant pangolin Smutsia gigantea camera trap surveys. Oryx, vol(issue)pp. doi:en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-6053
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/626972
dc.description.abstractThe Endangered giant pangolin (Smutsia gigantea) is rare and elusive across its central African range. Due to its solitary and nocturnal nature, the species is difficult to study and subsequently its ecology is poorly known. Pangolins are considered the World’s most-trafficked mammals. Therefore, accurately confirming presence and monitoring trends in distribution and abundance is essential to inform and prioritise conservation efforts. Camera traps are a popular tool for surveying rare and cryptic species. However non-targeted camera trap surveys yield low camera trapping rates for pangolins. Here we use camera trap data from surveys conducted within three protected areas in Uganda to test whether targeted placement of cameras improves giant pangolin detection probability in occupancy models. The results indicate that giant pangolin detection probability is highest when camera traps are targeted on burrows. The median number of days from camera deployment to first giant pangolin event was 12, with 97.5% of events captured within 32 days from deployment. The median interval between giant pangolin events at a camera trap site was 33 days. We demonstrate that camera trap surveys can be designed to improve detection of giant pangolins and outline a set of recommendations to maximise the effectiveness of efforts to survey and monitor the species.en_US
dc.publisherCambirdge University Pressen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/oryxen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectcamera trapen_US
dc.subjectdetection probabilityen_US
dc.subjectGiant Pangolinen_US
dc.subjectoccupancy modellingen_US
dc.subjectSmutsia Giganteaen_US
dc.subjectsurvey designen_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleTargeting burrows improves detection in giant pangolin Smutsia gigantea camera trap surveysen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1365-3008en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; North of England Zoological Society; Chester Zooen_US
dc.identifier.journalOryxen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderNorth of England Zoological Societyen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectBIO19/09en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-05-20
rioxxterms.publicationdate2022
dc.date.deposited2022-06-28en_US


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International