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dc.contributor.authorCarey, Malcolm
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-10T15:41:13Z
dc.date.available2022-01-10T15:41:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-13
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/626632/conditionalityageingFinal.pdf?sequence=4
dc.identifier.citationCarey, M. (2022). Welfare conditionality, ethics and social care for older people in the UK: From civic rights to abandonment?’ British Journal of Social Work, 52(5), 3230–3246. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcab233en_US
dc.identifier.issn0045-3102
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bcab233
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/626632
dc.descriptionThis is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [British Journal of Social Work] following peer review. The version of record [Carey, M. (2022). Welfare conditionality, ethics and social care for older people in the UK: From civic rights to abandonment?’ British Journal of Social Work, 52(5), 3230–3246] is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/bjsw/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcab233/6460193?redirectedFrom=fulltext.en_US
dc.description.abstractWelfare systems are becoming ever more conditional, with access to state support increasingly rationed via a legion of legally-defined and financially-driven restrictions and rules. Civic protection and economic rights for older citizens within Western policy systems are subsequently diminishing and continue to give way to neoliberal discursive practices which prioritise welfare activation, autonomy, participation, asset-based yet precarious self-care, the aversion of health-centred risks and much higher levels of eligibility for support. This article looks at welfare conditionality and its relationship to older people, ethics and governance within social care. By using three examples of welfare conditional reforms from the UK, it is highlighted that strains typically persist between the altruistic components of some ethical frameworks and the everyday experiences of many older people. The relative gatekeeping powers of welfare professionals and expectations placed on family members and carers have also increased, especially upon older people with higher needs and who may lack economic and cultural capital. This is despite rhetorical policy-led claims of increasing choice and control, and allowing support to be more asset-based and personalised.en_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesn/aen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/bjsw/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcab233/6460193?redirectedFrom=fulltexten_US
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectasset-based careen_US
dc.subjectolder peopleen_US
dc.subjectconditionalityen_US
dc.subjectpersonalisationen_US
dc.titleWelfare conditionality, ethics and social care for older people in the UK: From civic rights to abandonment?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1468-263Xen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Worken_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderno fundingen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectn/aen_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/bjsw/bcab233en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2023-12-13
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-11-11
rioxxterms.publicationdate2021-12-13
dc.date.deposited2022-01-10en_US
dc.indentifier.issn0045-3102en_US


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CC0 1.0 Universal
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