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dc.contributor.authorBos, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-10T15:01:40Z
dc.date.available2022-01-10T15:01:40Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-16
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/626630/Geography%20and%20Virtual%20Reality%20-%20Main%20Body%20MH.pdf?sequence=4
dc.identifier.citationBos, D. (2021). Geography and virtual reality. Geography Compass, 15(9), e12590. https://doi.org/10.1111/gec3.12590en_US
dc.identifier.issnNo print ISSN
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/gec3.12590
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/626630
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [Bos, D. (2021). Geography and virtual reality. Geography Compass, 15(9), e12590], which has been published in final form at [https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gec3.12590]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhilst virtual reality (VR) has a long history, recent technological advancements, increased accessibility and affordability have seen its usage become widespread within western consumer society. Despite the relevance of VR to Geography, these more recent developments have escaped scholarly attention. This paper takes a critical perspective on the development of VR and its varied applications, and how emerging theoretical debates within cultural and digital geography can critically attend to the social and cultural implications of VR technologies. The paper begins by considering how VR spaces are imagined and communicated to publics in ways that promote popular understandings of, and desires for, virtual spaces. Next, the paper critically addresses the cultural politics of VR content, particularly drawing attention to the socio-spatial differences evoked through VR. The paper goes on to argue for the need to consider VR through the concept of interface as a way of critically attending to the broader techno-socio relations and the embodied spatial encounters they produce. Finally, some methodological implications for thinking with and through VR are outlined.en_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gec3.12590en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectcultural geographyen_US
dc.subjectdigital geographyen_US
dc.subjectVirtual Realityen_US
dc.titleGeography and Virtual Realityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1749-8198en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalGeography Compassen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderN/Aen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectN/Aen_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/gec3.12590en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2023-08-16
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-07-30
rioxxterms.publicationdate2021-08-16
dc.date.deposited2022-01-10en_US
dc.indentifier.issnNo print ISSNen_US


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International