Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorHalfacree, Keith
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-23T11:41:16Z
dc.date.available2021-11-23T11:41:16Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-01
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/626407/Sheep%20who%20Shape_submitted%20manuscript%20accepted.pdf?sequence=1
dc.identifier.citationHalfacree, K., & Williams, F. (2021). Advancing rural as ‘something more than a human estate’: Exploring UK sheep-shaping. Journal of Rural Studies, 87, 375-385. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2021.09.020en_US
dc.identifier.issn0743-0167
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jrurstud.2021.09.020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/626407
dc.description.abstractPeriodically, the topic of defining rural is addressed within rural social science scholarship but done so in overwhelmingly human terms. This paper engages with this observation, arguing the simple but axiomatic point that the rural is not solely a human taxonomic creation but expresses a space that integrally and intimately involves the more-than-human. Consequently, the latter should be strongly, firmly and richly represented up-front within the defining rural debate. Adopting an established if, to date, still anthropocentricised three-fold model of rural space, the paper argues that each dimension – localities, representations, lives – feature the more-than-human in both passive and active ways. Overall, bringing more-than-human perspectives much further to the fore consolidates the idea of rural as inherently co-produced, a ‘baroque assemblage’ containing many more-than-human living things. Accounts of animals within such a rural must recognise their emplacing from a diversity of foci, interests and consequences. The paper begins to introduce details of this diverse co-production with respect to one ubiquitous rural animal, the sheep. It illustrates the ‘ensheeping’ of rural localities, representations and lives, with the practical significance of this brought together and drawn out through two rival accounts of sheep within the Lake District National Park. Finally, the seemingly modest call for rural studies to embrace animals more fully is argued to be enhanced today by ongoing and potentially imminent experiences impacting strongly on rural places.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 87en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0743016721002849en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectruralen_US
dc.subjectanimalsen_US
dc.subjectmore-than-humanen_US
dc.subjectsheepen_US
dc.subjectproduction of spaceen_US
dc.titleAdvancing rural as ‘something more than a human estate’: Exploring UK sheep-shapingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSwansea University; University of Chesteren_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Rural Studiesen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderUoC QR grant: GID00022en_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectQR: GID00022en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.jrurstud.2021.09.020en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2023-10-01
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-09-14
rioxxterms.publicationdate2021-10-01
dc.date.deposited2021-11-23en_US
dc.indentifier.issn0743-0167en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
Sheep who Shape_submitted ...
Embargo:
2023-10-01
Size:
534.2Kb
Format:
PDF
Request:
Revised manuscript accepted for ...

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International