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dc.contributor.advisorManning, Paul
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Nigel T.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-15T16:18:30Z
dc.date.available2021-11-15T16:18:30Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-31
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/626345/DBA%20FINAL.%20N.BAKER%201426623.pdf?sequence=1
dc.identifier.citationBaker, N. T. (2020). Disruptive philanthropy: Assessing the challenges of funding from “Big Tech” for a UK charity [Unpublished doctoral thesis]. University of Chester.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/626345
dc.description.abstractThe immense wealth generated by the technology sector – or Big Tech – since the end of the 20th century has created a new breed of philanthropists, keen to use the business practices of Silicon Valley to ensure their money is employed to optimum social impact. This study considers how a long-established, UK-based journalism charity can understand, and engage with, the new philanthropic practices of the digital economy in to order to fund transformative change, while appreciating, and managing, the associated benefits and risks. A characteristic of the digital economy is that it has blurred conventional boundaries between commercial and philanthropic practices. Accordingly, this study was conducted through the theoretical framework of “hybrid organizations” – defined here as non-profit entities which adopt business practices to achieve social ends but face the challenge of balancing the competing institutional logics of mission and money. This study synthesises the literature on the new, more market-oriented philanthropic models - collectively described here as “disruptive philanthropy” – to provide a conceptual model to guide hybrid, non-profits like the journalism charity that wish to engage with the digital economy. The model is then used to inform a qualitative, inductive study of the journalism charity using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of eight stakeholders from the journalism charity and four “elite” interviewees from the digital economy. This study makes a number of contributions to theory and practice in terms of understanding the digital economy’s business ethics and how non-profit organizations can assess clearly whether the funding support it is seeking from the digital economy is philanthropic or commercial. The conceptual model serves as a guide to hybrid, non-profit organizations on the factors to assess when seeking engagement with the digital economy. A framework is offered to help non-profits ensure good governance when accepting funds from the digital economy. The study reinforces the need for non-profits to have a clear identity and mission to obtain philanthropic funding. Finally, the study provides an understanding of how organizations from the digital economy assess their funding support through the benefits to their own “ecosystems” – which can be commercial, philanthropic or hybrid in nature.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectBig Techen_US
dc.subjectphilanthropyen_US
dc.subjectcharityen_US
dc.subjectbusinessen_US
dc.titleDisruptive Philanthropy: Assessing the Challenges of Funding from “Big Tech” for a UK Charityen_US
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen_US
dc.rights.embargodate2022-06-02
dc.type.qualificationnameDBAen_US
dc.rights.embargoreasonRecommended 6 month embargoen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.rights.usageThe full-text may be used and/or reproduced in any format or medium, without prior permission or charge, for personal research or study, educational, or not-for-profit purposes provided that: - A full bibliographic reference is made to the original source - A link is made to the metadata record in ChesterRep - The full-text is not changed in any way - The full-text must not be sold in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders. - For more information please email researchsupport.lis@chester.ac.uk


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