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dc.contributor.authorPasquali, Giovanni; email: giovanni.pasquali@manchester.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorGodfrey, Shane
dc.contributor.authorNadvi, Khalid
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T15:36:48Z
dc.date.available2021-09-23T15:36:48Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-23
dc.date.submitted2019-08-31
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625918/42214_2020_Article_71_nlm.xml?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625918/42214_2020_Article_71.pdf?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationJournal of International Business Policy, volume 4, issue 3, page 368-389
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625918
dc.descriptionFrom Springer Nature via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2019-08-31, rev-recd 2020-08-06, accepted 2020-08-21, registration 2020-08-25, pub-electronic 2020-09-23, online 2020-09-23, pub-print 2021-09
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Regional value chains (RVCs) and South–South trade are increasingly considered key features of 21st-century globalisation. This article investigates how RVCs are shaped by the interaction of private and public governance. It evaluates how this interaction unfolded in Southern Africa’s apparel RVCs, exploring trade, investment and labour regimes across three levels of analysis: national, regional, and global. The paper draws on trade data, secondary literature, and interviews with suppliers and institutions in Eswatini and Lesotho (the largest exporters to the region), and lead firms in South Africa (the largest regional importer). The findings underline the critical role of public governance in shaping retailers’ and suppliers’ participation in RVCs through: (i) regional ‘trade regimes’ protecting regional exporters from global competitors, and recent shifts in global trade regimes; (ii) national and regional ‘investment regimes’ facilitating investment flows from South Africa to Lesotho and Eswatini, and the more recent shift of US-oriented suppliers towards regional markets; and (iii) ‘labour regimes’, including lower wages, less comprehensive labour legislation and weaker trade unions in Lesotho and Eswatini compared to South Africa. The article concludes by considering the policy implications of the interaction of private and public governance for existing and future RVCs in Sub-Saharan Africa.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan UK
dc.rightsLicence for this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcepissn: 2522-0691
dc.sourceeissn: 2522-0705
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subjectGlobal Value Chain-Oriented Policies
dc.subjectregional value chains
dc.subjectglobal value chains
dc.subjectSouth–South trade
dc.subjectpublic governance
dc.subjectSouth Africa
dc.subjectLesotho
dc.subjectEswatini
dc.subjectapparel
dc.titleUnderstanding regional value chains through the interaction of public and private governance: Insights from Southern Africa’s apparel sector
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-09-23T15:36:48Z
dc.date.accepted2020-08-21


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