Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNabawy, Mostafa R. A.; orcid: 0000-0002-4252-1635; email: mostafa.ahmednabawy@manchester.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorMarcinkeviciute, Ruta
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-22T08:18:40Z
dc.date.available2021-09-22T08:18:40Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-22
dc.date.submitted2021-03-16
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625906/rsos.210452.xml?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625906/rsos.210452.pdf?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationRoyal Society Open Science, volume 8, issue 9, page 210452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625906
dc.descriptionFrom The Royal Society via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2021-03-16, accepted 2021-08-31, collection 2021-09, pub-electronic 2021-09-22
dc.descriptionArticle version: VoR
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.descriptionFunder: Leverhulme Trust; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000275; Grant(s): RPG-2019-366
dc.description.abstractThis work aims to develop an integrated conceptual design process to assess the scalability and performance of propulsion systems of resonant motor-driven flapping wing vehicles. The developed process allows designers to explore the interaction between electrical, mechanical and aerodynamic domains in a single transparent design environment. Wings are modelled based on a quasi-steady treatment that evaluates aerodynamics from geometry and kinematic information. System mechanics is modelled as a damped second-order dynamic system operating at resonance with nonlinear aerodynamic damping. Motors are modelled using standard equations that relate operational parameters and AC voltage input. Design scaling laws are developed using available data based on current levels of technology. The design method provides insights into the effects of changing core design variables such as the actuator size, actuator mass fraction and pitching kinematics on the overall design solution. It is shown that system efficiency achieves peak values of 30–36% at motor masses of 0.5–1 g when a constant angle of attack kinematics is employed. While sinusoidal angle of attack kinematics demands more aerodynamic and electric powers compared with the constant angle of attack case, sinusoidal angle of attack kinematics can lead to a maximum difference of around 15% in peak system efficiency.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rightsLicence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceeissn: 2054-5703
dc.subjectEngineering
dc.subjectResearch articles
dc.subjectrobotic insects
dc.subjectdesign
dc.subjectflapping wings
dc.subjectDC motors
dc.subjectresonance
dc.subjectscalability
dc.titleScalability of resonant motor-driven flapping wing propulsion systems
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-09-22T08:18:40Z
dc.date.accepted2021-08-31


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
rsos.210452.xml
Size:
7.140Kb
Format:
XML
Thumbnail
Name:
rsos.210452.pdf
Size:
2.218Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record