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dc.contributor.authorBellet, Camille; orcid: 0000-0002-2544-3436; email: camille.bellet@manchester.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Lindsay
dc.contributor.authorRushton, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-20T15:33:54Z
dc.date.available2021-09-20T15:33:54Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-20
dc.date.submitted2020-11-03
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625898/additional-files.zip?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625898/41599_2021_Article_890.pdf?sequence=3
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625898/41599_2021_Article_890_nlm.xml?sequence=4
dc.identifier.citationHumanities and Social Sciences Communications, volume 8, issue 1, page 214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625898
dc.descriptionFrom Springer Nature via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2020-11-03, accepted 2021-08-19, registration 2021-09-02, pub-electronic 2021-09-20, online 2021-09-20, collection 2021-12
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.description.abstractAbstract: This study makes the case for a new scientific logic of routine animal health care in industrial farming in Europe. We argue that the social regime underpinning scientific research and development on chronic animal disease management (CADM) in Europe stifles innovation and sustains a productivist model of animal husbandry that facilitates and maintains chronic animal diseases rather than eliminating them. Drawing on documentary analysis and qualitative interviews, the study explores the science of CADM in the broiler, cattle and pig sectors of the European food industry. Our findings show that in these major sectors, research and development on CADM is largely orientated towards a logic of growth, profitability and control rather than a recognition of the interconnection between chronic animal diseases, the food industry, and people (especially consumers) as advocated by the One Health approach. The study contributes to the literature on medical humanities and science and technology studies within One Health and public health in two ways: First, we draw new focus towards chronic animal diseases that are non-transmissible to humans and argue that while these are not zoonoses, they are equally worthy of attention for managing the emergence of new pathogens and diseases. Second, we expand the conceptualisation of One Health to include chronic animal health conditions. Our argument is that public health as an outcome of the One Health approach should be a term of reference that applies to humans and nonhumans alike whether they be farmed animals, practitioners or consumers.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan UK
dc.rightsLicence for this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceeissn: 2662-9992
dc.subjectArticle
dc.subject/4007/4044
dc.subject/4014/4045
dc.subject/4007/4043
dc.subjectarticle
dc.titleRe-thinking public health: Towards a new scientific logic of routine animal health care in European industrial farming
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-09-20T15:33:53Z
dc.date.accepted2021-08-19


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