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dc.contributor.authorPerczel, Julia; email: julia.perczel@manchester.ac.uk
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-02T05:36:27Z
dc.date.available2021-08-02T05:36:27Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-01
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625460/1467-8322.12668.pdf?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625460/1467-8322.12668.xml?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationAnthropology Today, volume 37, issue 4, page 27-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625460
dc.descriptionFrom Wiley via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: pub-print 2021-08, pub-electronic 2021-08-01
dc.descriptionArticle version: VoR
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.description.abstractDespite the notorious invisibility of toxicity, an aesthetic narrative has developed around the threat of e‐waste. In reports about toxicity in New Delhi, India, the dirt, grime and discarded remnants of electronics are presented in a particular visual manner to instil horror among readers and viewers. Such a representation has far‐reaching influences on policy. The seven pictures and the accompanying text in this article seek to challenge such a linear narrative of e‐waste's toxicity and offer fragments of other untold stories that challenge the established narrative and evoke the rich social life entwined with e‐waste.
dc.languageen
dc.rightsLicence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceissn: 0268-540X
dc.sourceissn: 1467-8322
dc.subjectOriginal Article
dc.subjectOriginal Articles
dc.titleWhere is toxicity located? Side glances through fieldwork in a toxic place
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-08-02T05:36:27Z


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