Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSlade, Pauline; orcid: 0000-0001-5877-2706; email: pauline.slade@liverpool.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorSheen, Kayleigh
dc.contributor.authorWeeks, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorWray, Susan
dc.contributor.authorDe Pascalis, Leonardo
dc.contributor.authorLunt, Karen
dc.contributor.authorBedwell, Carol
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Belinda
dc.contributor.authorHill, Johnathan
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-02T05:29:38Z
dc.date.available2021-07-02T05:29:38Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-05
dc.date.submitted2020-08-04
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625114/aogs.14063.pdf?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625114/aogs.14063.xml?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, volume 100, issue 7, page 1288-1296
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625114
dc.descriptionFrom Wiley via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2020-08-04, rev-recd 2020-10-24, accepted 2020-11-19, pub-electronic 2021-02-05, pub-print 2021-07
dc.descriptionArticle version: VoR
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.descriptionFunder: UK Medical Research Council; Grant(s): G0400577
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Introduction: Despite widespread belief that anxiety causes longer labor, evidence of association is inconsistent. Data gathered as part of a prospective epidemiological longitudinal study were used to investigate associations between antenatal anxiety and pregnancy‐specific stress, and labor progression was assessed by duration and use of augmentation. Material and methods: Pregnant primiparous women completed measures for anxiety and pregnancy‐specific stress at 20 weeks’ gestation (n = 1145). Birth outcome data were extracted from medical records. Regression analyses and a path analysis assessed associations between antenatal anxiety and pregnancy‐specific stress, and indices of labor progression (labor duration and augmentation). Results: Anxiety/pregnancy‐specific stress were not directly associated with duration of stage 1 labor (HIGH/LOW anxiety: mean difference = 13.94 minutes, SD = 20.66, 95% CI −26.60 to 54.49, P < .50)/(HIGH/LOW pregnancy‐specific stress: mean difference = 12.05 minutes, SD = 16.09, 95% CI −19.52 to 43.63, P < .45). However, anxiety/pregnancy‐specific stress were associated with epidural use (HIGH/LOW anxiety: 39% vs 31%, P < .042; HIGH/LOW pregnancy‐specific stress: 38% vs 29%, P < .001), which was itself associated with longer labor (mean difference: 158.79 minutes, SD = 16.76, 95% CI 125.89‐191.68, P < .001). Anxiety and pregnancy‐specific stress were associated with increased likelihood of augmentation but these associations were nonsignificant after accounting for epidural, which was itself highly associated with augmentation. However, path analysis indicated an indirect effect linking pregnancy‐specific stress, but not general anxiety, to labor duration and augmentation: elevated pregnancy‐specific stress led to greater use of epidural, which was linked to both increased rates of augmentation, and increased labor duration. Conclusions: Contrary to general belief, general anxiety and specific pregnancy stress were not directly linked to longer duration of stage one labor. However specific pregnancy stress was associated with epidural use, which in turn was significantly associated with risk of augmentation, and longer stage one labor. Identification of pregnancy‐specific stress could help to identify women for whom psychological interventions could improve birth experience.
dc.languageen
dc.rightsLicence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceissn: 0001-6349
dc.sourceissn: 1600-0412
dc.subjectORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
dc.subjectPREGNANCY
dc.subjectanxiety
dc.subjectaugmentation
dc.subjectepidural
dc.subjectfear of childbirth
dc.subjectlabor duration
dc.subjectpregnancy‐specific stress
dc.titleDo stress and anxiety in early pregnancy affect the progress of labor: Evidence from the Wirral Child Health and Development Study
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-07-02T05:29:38Z
dc.date.accepted2020-11-19


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
aogs.14063.pdf
Size:
668.7Kb
Format:
PDF
Thumbnail
Name:
aogs.14063.xml
Size:
12.52Kb
Format:
XML

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record