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dc.contributor.authorBano-Otalora, Beatriz; orcid: 0000-0003-4694-9943
dc.contributor.authorMartial, Franck
dc.contributor.authorHarding, Court
dc.contributor.authorBechtold, David A; orcid: 0000-0001-8676-8704
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Annette E; orcid: 0000-0003-0214-7076
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Timothy M; orcid: 0000-0002-5625-4750
dc.contributor.authorBelle, Mino D C; orcid: 0000-0002-4917-957X
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Robert J; orcid: 0000-0002-1088-8029; email: robert.lucas@manchester.ac.uk
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-28T00:52:52Z
dc.date.available2021-06-28T00:52:52Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-01
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625065/article.pdf?sequence=2
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, volume 118, issue 22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625065
dc.descriptionFrom Europe PMC via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: ppub 2021-06-01
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.descriptionFunder: Wellcome Trust; Grant(s): 210684/Z/18/Z
dc.descriptionFunder: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council; Grant(s): BB/P009182/1
dc.description.abstractMammalian circadian rhythms are orchestrated by a master pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), which receives information about the 24 h light-dark cycle from the retina. The accepted function of this light signal is to reset circadian phase in order to ensure appropriate synchronization with the celestial day. Here, we ask whether light also impacts another key property of the circadian oscillation, its amplitude. To this end, we measured circadian rhythms in behavioral activity, body temperature, and SCN electrophysiological activity in the diurnal murid rodent <i>Rhabdomys pumilio</i> following stable entrainment to 12:12 light-dark cycles at four different daytime intensities (ranging from 18 to 1,900 lx melanopic equivalent daylight illuminance). <i>R. pumilio</i> showed strongly diurnal activity and body temperature rhythms in all conditions, but measures of rhythm robustness were positively correlated with daytime irradiance under both entrainment and subsequent free run. Whole-cell and extracellular recordings of electrophysiological activity in ex vivo SCN revealed substantial differences in electrophysiological activity between dim and bright light conditions. At lower daytime irradiance, daytime peaks in SCN spontaneous firing rate and membrane depolarization were substantially depressed, leading to an overall marked reduction in the amplitude of circadian rhythms in spontaneous activity. Our data reveal a previously unappreciated impact of daytime light intensity on SCN physiology and the amplitude of circadian rhythms and highlight the potential importance of daytime light exposure for circadian health.
dc.languageeng
dc.rightsLicence for this article: cc by
dc.sourceissn: 0027-8424
dc.sourceessn: 1091-6490
dc.sourcenlmid: 7505876
dc.subjectLight
dc.subjectRetina
dc.subjectSuprachiasmatic nucleus
dc.subjectCircadian
dc.titleBright daytime light enhances circadian amplitude in a diurnal mammal.
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-06-28T00:52:52Z


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