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dc.contributor.authorKeyworth, Chris; orcid: 0000-0002-7815-6174; email: chris.keyworth@manchester.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorEpton, Tracy
dc.contributor.authorGoldthorpe, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorCalam, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorArmitage, Christopher J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-26T20:11:27Z
dc.date.available2021-06-26T20:11:27Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-04
dc.date.submitted2020-07-27
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625053/hex.13221.xml?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625053/hex.13221.pdf?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationHealth Expectations, volume 24, issue 3, page 819-832
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625053
dc.descriptionFrom Wiley via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2020-07-27, rev-recd 2021-01-29, accepted 2021-02-05, pub-electronic 2021-03-04, pub-print 2021-06
dc.descriptionArticle version: VoR
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.descriptionFunder: Tesco PLC; Grant(s): 3662‐5925
dc.descriptionFunder: NIHR. Tesco PLC; Grant(s): R119456
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Background: Consistent with the ‘Making Every Contact Count’ UK public health policy, general practitioners (GPs) are expected to provide patients with behaviour change interventions opportunistically. However, there is a belief widely held among GPs that patients neither want or need such interventions. We aimed to understand the following: (a) the characteristics of people attending GP appointments, (b) patients' needs for health behaviour change, (c) perceptions of appropriateness and helpfulness of interventions, and (d) factors associated with recall of receipt of interventions. Methods: Cross‐sectional nationally representative online survey of UK adults who had attended GP clinics in the preceding four weeks (n = 3028). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression. Results: 94.5% (n = 2862) of patients breached at least one health behaviour guideline, and 55.1% reported never having had a conversation with their GP about health behaviours. The majority of patients perceived intervention as appropriate (range 84.2%‐87.4% across behaviours) and helpful (range 82.8%‐85.9% across behaviours). Being male (OR = 1.412, 95% CI 1.217, 1.639), having a long‐term condition (OR = 1.514, 95% CI 1.287, 1.782) and a higher number of repeat GP visits (OR = 1.016, 95% CI 1.010, 1.023) were among factors associated with recall of receipt of interventions. Conclusions: Patients perceived behaviour change intervention during routine GP consultations as appropriate and helpful, yet there are variations in the likelihood of receiving interventions according to sociodemographic factors. GPs could adopt a more proactive approach to behaviour change in patient consultations with the broad approval of patients. Patient or public contribution: The questionnaire was piloted among a convenience sample prior to distribution.
dc.languageen
dc.rightsLicence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceissn: 1369-6513
dc.sourceissn: 1369-7625
dc.subjectORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER
dc.subjectORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPERS
dc.subjectbehaviour change
dc.subjectgeneral practitioners
dc.subjecthealth policy
dc.subjecthealth‐care professionals
dc.subjectpatient education
dc.subjectprevention
dc.subjectprimary care
dc.titlePatients' experiences of behaviour change interventions delivered by general practitioners during routine consultations: A nationally representative survey
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-06-26T20:11:27Z
dc.date.accepted2021-02-05


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