Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMurray, Lindsay
dc.contributor.advisorRodway, Paul
dc.contributor.authorDíaz González, Sergio
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-25T11:07:00Z
dc.date.available2021-06-25T11:07:00Z
dc.date.issued2021-01
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/625040/Final_Sergio%20Diaz%20Thesis.pdf?sequence=1
dc.identifier.citationDíaz González, S. (2021). Laterality in chimpanzees: Links with behavioural style and social networks [Unpublished doctoral thesis]. University of Chester.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/625040
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents a series of studies investigating laterality in chimpanzees and its links with personality examined as behavioural style and social networks. The studies presented in this work were conducted by observing a group of 19 chimpanzees in captivity and present new findings in this species. However, this thesis has a broad evolutionary perspective, addressing important questions regarding personality and laterality that could prove helpful to the understanding of the evolution of laterality in vertebrates. Chapter 1 offers a general review of the three main areas of knowledge investigated: laterality, animal personality and primate social networks. Then, the first study of this project, presented in Chapter 2, began by exploring hand preference in the chimpanzee group, investigating spontaneous actions and unimanual tasks and expanding previous research by studying posture, between-task consistency and temporal stability. Chapter 3 investigated additional measures of motor laterality and proposed a novel way of measuring laterality in primates. Together, Chapters 2 and 3 directly examine laterality in chimpanzees and serve as the base from which to explore the links between laterality, personality and social networks in the subsequent studies. If lateralization is rooted in emotional processing and hemispheric lateralization, then individual differences in behaviour (particularly those that reflect emotional expression) would show a relationship with individual laterality. In order to address this question, Chapter 4 studies behavioural style in chimpanzees and its possible link with laterality. Simultaneously, if intraspecific coordination plays a role in the development of population level laterality, similarly lateralised individuals would likely have strong bonds to coordinate with each other. Chapter 5 introduces the approach and techniques of social network analysis and uses them to explore and describe the social structure of the group while describing the integration of a new adult chimpanzee. Chapter 6 applies social network analysis to explore if laterality plays a role in the way the group is structured. Lastly, Chapter 7 integrates all empirical chapters and presents the final discussion and conclusions of the thesis.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectchimpanzeesen_US
dc.subjectlateralityen_US
dc.subjectpersonalityen_US
dc.subjectsocial networksen_US
dc.titleLaterality in Chimpanzees: Links with Behavioural Style and Social Networksen_US
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen_US
dc.rights.embargodate2021-07-16
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.rights.embargoreasonAward not conferred till BoS 15/07/2021en_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Final_Sergio Diaz Thesis.pdf
Size:
1.348Mb
Format:
PDF
Request:
Thesis

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International