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dc.contributor.authorSmart, Emily L; email: emily.smart2@nhs.net
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Katherine; email: katherine.berry@manchester.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorPalmier-Claus, Jasper; email: j.palmier-claus@lancaster.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Laura J E; email: laura.brown@manchester.ac.uk
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-18T00:35:08Z
dc.date.available2021-06-18T00:35:08Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-31
dc.date.submitted2020-04-13
dc.identifierpubmed: 34082995
dc.identifierpii: S0890-4065(21)00015-3
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1016/j.jaging.2021.100925
dc.identifier.citationJournal of aging studies, volume 57, page 100925
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/624978
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2020-04-13, revised 2021-03-05, accepted 2021-03-22
dc.descriptionPublication status: ppublish
dc.description.abstractDespite the unique challenges faced by people living with a severe mental illness, little work has been done to understand how these populations can age well. This study therefore aimed to explore the views of mid to older aged adults living with a psychosis on what it means to age well, and how they might be supported in this endeavor. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with sixteen individuals (age 50-74 years) diagnosed with psychosis-related disorders (e.g. schizophrenia). Inductive thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Four themes were identified: (i) Engagement with Life - referring to participating in, and maintaining, activities that bring satisfaction and value; (ii) Attitude to Life and Aging - referring to a positive attitude and outlook, and accepting aging-related challenges; (iii) Health and Wellbeing - relating to keeping as physically and mentally fit as possible and (iv) Social Connections - referring to both personal and professional relationships, and feeling heard and understood by others. Whilst there were clear parallels between these results and those reported from other populations, participants aging with a psychosis revealed challenges, perceptions, and nuances that were unique to their situation. The importance of relationships with professionals, developing a mastery over their mental health difficulties, and the continued impact of stigma on aging well were highlighted. This suggests that approaches that target external societal factors, as well as therapeutic interventions focused on the individual, may help this population to age well. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.]
dc.languageeng
dc.sourceeissn: 1879-193X
dc.subjectPsychosis
dc.subjectPsychosocial
dc.subjectQualitative
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectSuccessful aging
dc.titleAging well with psychosis.
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-06-18T00:35:08Z
dc.date.accepted2021-03-22


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