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dc.contributor.authorWiniarski, B
dc.contributor.authorGholinia, A; email: ali.gholinia@manchester.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorMingard, K
dc.contributor.authorGee, M
dc.contributor.authorThompson, G
dc.contributor.authorWithers, P J
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-11T01:09:06Z
dc.date.available2021-06-11T01:09:06Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-14
dc.date.submitted2020-05-27
dc.identifierpubmed: 34049196
dc.identifierpii: S0304-3991(21)00101-7
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1016/j.ultramic.2021.113315
dc.identifier.citationUltramicroscopy, volume 226, page 113315
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/624905
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2020-05-27, revised 2021-03-31, accepted 2021-05-09
dc.descriptionPublication status: aheadofprint
dc.description.abstractThere is an increasing requirement for the acquisition of large two (2D) or three (3D) dimensional electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) maps. It is a well-known, but largely neglected fact, that EBSD maps may contain distortions. These include long-range distortions, which can be caused by the interaction of the electron beam with the sample geometry and it can also arise from sample or beam drift. In addition there are shorter range artefacts arising from topographical features, such as curtaining. The geometrical distortions can be minimised by careful SEM calibrations and sample alignment. However, the long-range distortions become increasingly prevalent when acquiring large area 2D EBSD maps which take a long time to acquire and thus are especially prone to drift. These distortions are especially evident in serial section tomography (SST) when 2D maps are stacked on top of one another to produce 3D maps. Here we quantify these distortions for large area EBSD data by referencing them to secondary electron (SE) images for 3D-EBSD data acquired on a WCCo hardmetal. Long-range distortions (due to drift) equating to around 10μm across a 200μm x 175 μm area map, and short-range distortions (due to topographical effects) as large as 3 μm over a distance of 40 µm were observed. Methods for correcting these distortions are then proposed. This study illustrates the benefits and necessity of such corrections if morphological features are to be properly interpreted when collecting large 3D EBSD datasets, for example by mechanical sectioning, serial block face SEM ultramicrotomy, laser sectioning, FIB-SEM tomography, PFIB spin milling, etc. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2021. Published by Elsevier B.V.]
dc.languageeng
dc.sourceeissn: 1879-2723
dc.subjectBroad ion beam polishing
dc.subjectCermet
dc.subjectComputed tomography (CT)
dc.subjectSerial block face sectioning electron microscopy (SBFSEM)
dc.subjectelectron back scatter diffraction
dc.subjectfocused ion beam (FIB)
dc.titleCorrection of artefacts associated with large area EBSD.
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-06-11T01:09:06Z
dc.date.accepted2021-05-09


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