Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStage, Helena B.; orcid: 0000-0001-9938-8452; email: helena.stage@manchester.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorShingleton, Joseph; orcid: 0000-0002-1628-3231; email: Joseph.Shingleton@phe.gov.uk
dc.contributor.authorGhosh, Sanmitra; orcid: 0000-0002-4879-7587
dc.contributor.authorScarabel, Francesca; orcid: 0000-0003-0250-4555
dc.contributor.authorPellis, Lorenzo; orcid: 0000-0002-3436-6487
dc.contributor.authorFinnie, Thomas; orcid: 0000-0001-5962-4211
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-31T20:32:19Z
dc.date.available2021-05-31T20:32:19Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-31
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/624788/rstb.2020.0277.xml?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/624788/rstb.2020.0277.pdf?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, volume 376, issue 1829, page 20200277
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/624788
dc.descriptionFrom The Royal Society via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: accepted 2020-12-02, pub-electronic 2021-05-31, pub-print 2021-07-19
dc.descriptionArticle version: VoR
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.descriptionFunder: Wellcome Trust; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100004440; Grant(s): 202562/Z/16/Z
dc.descriptionFunder: Royal Society; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000288; Grant(s): 202562/Z/16/Z
dc.descriptionFunder: Department for Health and Social Care
dc.descriptionFunder: Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000024; Grant(s): 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) rapid research
dc.descriptionFunder: Medical Research Council; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265; Grant(s): MC UU 00002/11
dc.description.abstractWe investigate the effect of school closure and subsequent reopening on the transmission of COVID-19, by considering Denmark, Norway, Sweden and German states as case studies. By comparing the growth rates in daily hospitalizations or confirmed cases under different interventions, we provide evidence that school closures contribute to a reduction in the growth rate approximately 7 days after implementation. Limited school attendance, such as older students sitting exams or the partial return of younger year groups, does not appear to significantly affect community transmission. In countries where community transmission is generally low, such as Denmark or Norway, a large-scale reopening of schools while controlling or suppressing the epidemic appears feasible. However, school reopening can contribute to statistically significant increases in the growth rate in countries like Germany, where community transmission is relatively high. In all regions, a combination of low classroom occupancy and robust test-and-trace measures were in place. Our findings underscore the need for a cautious evaluation of reopening strategies. This article is part of the theme issue ‘Modelling that shaped the early COVID-19 pandemic response in the UK’.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rightsLicence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcepissn: 0962-8436
dc.sourceeissn: 1471-2970
dc.subjectARTICLES
dc.subjectResearch articles
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectschool closure
dc.subjectschool reopening
dc.subjectnon-pharmaceutical interventions
dc.titleShut and re-open: the role of schools in the spread of COVID-19 in Europe
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-05-31T20:32:19Z
dc.date.accepted2020-12-02


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
rstb.2020.0277.xml
Size:
11.35Kb
Format:
XML
Thumbnail
Name:
rstb.2020.0277.pdf
Size:
1.118Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record