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dc.contributor.authorSobczyńska-Malefora, Agata; orcid: 0000-0001-7349-9517
dc.contributor.authorDelvin, Edgard
dc.contributor.authorMcCaddon, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorAhmadi, Kourosh R
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Dominic J; orcid: 0000-0003-4786-9240
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-05T00:44:56Z
dc.date.available2021-05-05T00:44:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-21
dc.identifierpubmed: 33881359
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1080/10408363.2021.1885339
dc.identifier.citationCritical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences, page 1-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/624494
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionPublication status: aheadofprint
dc.description.abstractVitamin B (cobalamin) is an essential cofactor for two metabolic pathways. It is obtained principally from food of animal origin. Cobalamin becomes bioavailable through a series of steps pertaining to its release from dietary protein, intrinsic factor-mediated absorption, haptocorrin or transcobalamin-mediated transport, cellular uptake, and two enzymatic conversions ( methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA-mutase) into cofactor forms: methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin. Vitamin B deficiency can masquerade as a multitude of illnesses, presenting different perspectives from the point of view of the hematologist, neurologist, gastroenterologist, general physician, or dietician. Increased physician vigilance and heightened patient awareness often account for its early presentation, and testing sometimes occurs during a phase of vitamin B insufficiency before the main onset of the disease. The chosen test often depends on its availability rather than on the diagnostic performance and sensitivity to irrelevant factors interfering with vitamin B markers. Although serum B is still the most commonly used and widely available test, diagnostics by holotranscobalamin, serum methylmalonic acid, and plasma homocysteine measurements have grown in the last several years in routine practice. The lack of a robust absorption test, coupled with compromised sensitivity and specificity of other tests (intrinsic factor and gastric parietal cell antibodies), hinders determination of the cause for depleted B status. This can lead to incorrect supplementation regimes and uncertainty regarding later treatment. This review discusses currently available knowledge on vitamin B , informs the reader about the pitfalls of tests for assessing its deficiency, reviews B status in various populations at different disease stages, and provides recommendations for interpretation, treatment, and associated risks. Future directions for diagnostics of B status and health interventions are also discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.sourceeissn: 1549-781X
dc.subjectVitamin B12
dc.subjectcobalamin holotranscobalamin methylmalonic acid homocysteine
dc.titleVitamin B
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2021-05-05T00:44:55Z


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