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dc.contributor.authorBhattacharya-Mis, Namrata
dc.contributor.authorLamond, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-28T11:45:14Z
dc.date.available2021-01-28T11:45:14Z
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/624205/2021-Disaster%20Book%20ch6-NBMJL.authors%20copydocx.pdf?sequence=1
dc.identifier.citationLamond, J., & Bhattacharya-Mis, N. (in press). Resilience through flood memory– a comparison of the role of insurance and experience in flood resilience for households and businesses in England. In J. Mendes, G. Kalonji, R. Jigyasu, & A. Chang-Richards (Eds.), Strengthening Disaster Risk Governance to Manage Disaster Risk. Elsevier.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780128187500en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/624205
dc.description.abstractResilience to flooding is influenced by adaptations or behavior that address risk reduction at all stages of the disaster cycle. This includes: physical adaptation of buildings to limit damage; individual preparedness and business continuity planning; and provision of resources for reinstatement through insurance or recovery grants. In the UK implementation of such strategies lie mainly with private property owner and their private insurer while government policy promotes greater uptake by these actors as part of an integrated strategy. In the context of increased flood events the provision of affordable insurance has been increasingly challenging and in 2016 a new insurance arrangement (Flood Re) was put in place to support transition to affordable market based insurance. However, Flood Re is specific to residential property and excludes many categories of property previously guaranteed coverage including small businesses. The research used a survey of frequently flooded locations in England to explore the different experiences and behaviors of households and businesses at risk from flooding with respect to insurance and recovery in this evolving scenario. The results show distinct differences between households and businesses that could point to greater opportunities for enhancing resilience if policy and practice recognized those differences.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/books/strengthening-disaster-risk-governance-to-manage-disaster-risk/mendes/978-0-12-818750-0en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectresilienceen_US
dc.subjectbusinessesen_US
dc.subjectresidencesen_US
dc.subjectfloodingen_US
dc.subjectinsuranceen_US
dc.subjectmemoryen_US
dc.titleResilience through flood memory– a comparison of the role of insurance and experience in flood resilience for households and businesses in England.en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of West of Englanden_US
or.grant.openaccessNoen_US
rioxxterms.funderEPSRCen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectFlood Memoryen_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2221-01-15
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01
rioxxterms.publicationdate2021-01-15
dc.date.deposited2021-01-28en_US


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