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dc.contributor.authorDiaz, Sergio
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Lindsay
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Sam G. B.
dc.contributor.authorRodway, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:39:54Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:39:54Z
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/623885/Final%20paper.pdf?sequence=3
dc.identifier.citationDiaz, S. G., Murray, L., Roberts, S. & Rodway, P. (2020). Social Network Analysis of a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) group in captivity following the integration of a new adult member. International Journal of Primatology, 41, 683-700. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10764-020-00177-0en_US
dc.identifier.issn0164-0291
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10764-020-00177-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/623885
dc.description.abstractManagement of primates in captivity often presents the challenge of introducing new individuals into a group, and research investigating the stability of the social network in the medium-term after the introduction can help inform management decisions. We investigated the behavior of a group of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) housed at Chester Zoo, UK over 12 months (divided into three periods of four months) following the introduction of a new adult female. We recorded grooming, proximity, other affiliative behaviors and agonistic behaviors and used Social Network Analysis to investigate the stability, reciprocity and structure of the group, to examine the effect of rearing history on grooming network position and the role of sex in agonistic behavior. Both the grooming and agonistic networks correlated across all three periods, while affiliative networks correlated only between periods two and three. Males had significantly higher out-degree centrality in agonistic behaviors than females, indicating that they carried out agonistic behaviors more often than females. There was no significant difference in centrality between hand-reared and mother-reared chimpanzees. Overall, the group structure was stable and cohesive during the first year after the introduction of the new female, suggesting that this change did not destabilize the group. Our findings highlight the utility of Social Network Analysis in the study of primate sociality in captivity, and how it can be used to better understand primate behavior following the integration of new individuals.en_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10764-020-00177-0en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectSocial Network Analysisen_US
dc.subjectgroomingen_US
dc.subjectassociationen_US
dc.subjectmanagementen_US
dc.subjectchimpanzeesen_US
dc.subjectrearingen_US
dc.subjectsexen_US
dc.titleSocial network analysis of a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) group in captivity following the integration of a new adult memberen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1573-8604en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Liverpool John Moores Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Primatologyen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10764-020-00177-0en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-10-10
rioxxterms.publicationdate2020-10-10
dc.dateAccepted2020-08-20
dc.date.deposited2020-10-21en_US


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