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dc.contributor.authorStanley, Christina R
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Tessa
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Morgan J
dc.contributor.authorHosie, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorWormell, Dominic
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Eluned
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-03T12:31:48Z
dc.date.available2020-08-03T12:31:48Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-30
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/623569/animals-10-01321-v2.pdf?sequence=1
dc.identifier.citationWelch, M. J., Smith, T., Hosie, C., Wormell, D., Price, E., & Stanley, C. R. (2020). Social Experience of Captive Livingstone’s Fruit Bats (Pteropus livingstonii). Animals, 10(8), 1321. doi:10.3390/ani10081321en_US
dc.identifier.issn2076-2615
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ani10081321
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/623569
dc.description.abstractSocial network analysis has been highlighted as a powerful tool to enhance the evidence-based management of captive-housed species through its ability to quantify the social experience of individuals. We apply this technique to explore the social structure and social roles of 50 Livingstone’s fruit bats (Pteropus livingstonii) housed at Jersey Zoo, Channel Islands, through the observation of associative, affiliative, and aggressive interactions over two data collection periods. We implement binomial mixture modelling and characteristic-based assortment quantification to describe the complexity and organisation of social networks, as well as a multiple regression quadratic assignment procedural (MRQAP) test to analyse the relationship between network types. We examine the effects of individual characteristics (i.e., sex, age, and dominance rank) on social role by fitting models to explain the magnitude of node metrics. Additionally, we utilize a quadratic assignment procedural (QAP) test to assess the temporal stability of social roles over two seasons. Our results indicate that P. livingstonii display a non-random network structure. Observed social networks are positively assorted by age, as well as dominance rank. The frequency of association between individuals correlates with a higher frequency of behavioural interactions, both affiliative and aggressive. Individual social roles remain consistent over ten months. We recommend that, to improve welfare and captive breeding success, relationships between individuals of similar ages and dominance levels should be allowed to persist in this group where possible, and separating individuals that interact frequently in an affiliative context should be avoided.en_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/10/8/1321/htmen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectLivingstone’s fruit baten_US
dc.subjectsocial network analysisen_US
dc.subjectanimal welfareen_US
dc.subjectsocial rolesen_US
dc.subjectbinomial mixture modellingen_US
dc.titleSocial Experience of Captive Livingstone’s Fruit Bats (Pteropus livingstonii)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2076-2615en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Jersey Zooen_US
dc.identifier.journalAnimalsen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.3390/ani10081321en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07-30
rioxxterms.publicationdate2020-07-30
dc.dateAccepted2020-07-29
dc.date.deposited2020-08-03en_US


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Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International