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dc.contributor.authorAlsulami, Sooad
dc.contributor.authorNyakotey, David
dc.contributor.authorDudek, Kamila
dc.contributor.authorBawah, Abdul-Malik
dc.contributor.authorLovegrove, Julie
dc.contributor.authorAnnan, Reggie
dc.contributor.authorEllahi, Basma
dc.contributor.authorKarani, Santhanakrishnan Vimaleswaran
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-01T09:54:02Z
dc.date.available2020-07-01T09:54:02Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-27
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/623528/chester%20rep%20edited%20final%20manuscript.pdf?sequence=1
dc.identifier.citationAlsulami, S., Nyakotey, D, A., Dudek, K., Bawah, A., Lovegrove, J, A., Annan, R, A., Ellahi, B. & Vimaleswaran, K. S. (2020). Interaction between Metabolic Genetic Risk Score and Dietary Fatty Acid Intake on Central Obesity in a Ghanaian Population. Nutrients, 12(7), 1906.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu12071906
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/623528
dc.description.abstractObesity is a multifactorial condition arising from the interaction between genetic and lifestyle factors. We aimed to assess the impact of lifestyle and genetic factors on obesity-related traits in 302 healthy Ghanaian adults. Dietary intake and physical activity were assessed using a 3 day repeated 24 h dietary recall and global physical activity questionnaire, respectively. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to construct 4-SNP, 8-SNP and 12-SNP genetic risk scores (GRSs). The 4-SNP GRS showed significant interactions with dietary fat intakes on waist circumference (WC) (Total fat, Pinteraction = 0.01; saturated fatty acids (SFA), Pinteraction = 0.02; polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), Pinteraction = 0.01 and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), Pinteraction = 0.01). Among individuals with higher intakes of total fat (>47 g/d), SFA (>14 g/d), PUFA (>16 g/d) and MUFA (>16 g/d), individuals with ≥3 risk alleles had a significantly higher WC compared to those with <3 risk alleles. This is the first study of its kind in this population, suggesting that a higher consumption of dietary fatty acid may have the potential to increase the genetic susceptibility of becoming centrally obese. These results support the general dietary recommendations to decrease the intakes of total fat and SFA, to reduce the risk of obesity, particularly in individuals with a higher genetic predisposition to central obesity.en_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectGenetic risk scoreen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectGhanaen_US
dc.subjectGONGen_US
dc.subjectFat intakeen_US
dc.subjectGene–diet interactionen_US
dc.titleInteraction between Metabolic Genetic Risk Score and Dietary Fatty Acid Intake on Central Obesity in a Ghanaian Populationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Reading, University of Chester and Kumasi Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalNutrientsen_US
or.grant.openaccessYesen_US
rioxxterms.funderResearch England Growth Challenges Research Funden_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectQR390en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071906
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07-27
refterms.dateFCD2020-06-28T20:11:34Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-27T00:00:00Z
rioxxterms.publicationdate2020-07-27
dc.dateAccepted2020-06-24
dc.date.depositedhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.indentifier.issn2072-6643en_US


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International