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dc.contributor.authorDevenish-Nelson, Eleanor S.; orcid: 0000-0002-9029-4772; email: ellie.devenish@ed.ac.uk
dc.contributor.authorWeidemann, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Jason
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Howard P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-06T11:04:00Z
dc.date.available2020-06-06T11:04:00Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-04
dc.date.submitted2018-10-25
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/623477/10531_2019_Article_1768_nlm.xml?sequence=2
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/623477/additional-files.zip?sequence=3
dc.identifierhttps://chesterrep.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10034/623477/10531_2019_Article_1768.pdf?sequence=4
dc.identifier.citationBiodiversity and Conservation, volume 28, issue 7, page 1885-1904
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/623477
dc.descriptionFrom Springer Nature via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionHistory: received 2018-10-25, rev-recd 2019-03-19, registration 2019-04-26, accepted 2019-04-26, online 2019-05-04, epub 2019-05-04, ppub 2019-06
dc.descriptionPublication status: Published
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Unequal patterns in research effort can result in inaccurate assessments of species extinction risk or ineffective management. A group of notable conservation concern are tropical island endemic birds, many of which are also forest-dependent, which increases their vulnerability to extinction. Yet, island bird species have received limited research attention compared to their continental congeners, despite this taxon being globally regarded as well-studied. We used the insular Caribbean, a globally important endemism hotspot with high rates of deforestation, to explore research bias of island and regional endemic forest-dependent birds. A review of the published literature (n = 992) found no significant increase in the number of studies over the search period. Research effort was significantly higher among species with threatened status, long generation time, wide habitat breadth and low to intermediate elevational distributions. Among family groups, the Psittacidae received the highest research effort, while the Cuculidae were the most underrepresented family (30-fold higher and six-fold less than expected, respectively). We found geographic biases in effort, with Jamaica having six-fold less and Puerto Rico eight times more research than expected for their level of endemism. These patterns likely reflect individual interests and limited capacity and funding, typical of Small Island Developing States. With over 50% of species in this review having declining population trends, we recommend prioritizing research that emphasises conservation- and management-relevant data across underrepresented families and islands, by fostering greater collaboration between researchers, practitioners and the existing local amateur ornithological community.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands
dc.rightsLicence for this article: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcepissn: 0960-3115
dc.sourceeissn: 1572-9710
dc.subjectOriginal Paper
dc.subjectForest and plantation biodiversity
dc.subjectBiodiversity hotspot
dc.subjectBiogeography
dc.subjectCaribbean
dc.subjectExtinction risk
dc.subjectIslands
dc.subjectIUCN Red List
dc.subjectLife history
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.titlePatterns in island endemic forest-dependent bird research: the Caribbean as a case-study
dc.typearticle
dc.date.updated2020-06-06T11:04:00Z
dc.date.accepted2019-04-26
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-06T11:04:00Z


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